Asthma

This is a discussion thread · 8 replies
gritstone:
I'm thinking of buying a budgerigar for my girlfriend - but she has asthma and I don't want to make that worse. Will the budgie irritate her asthma please?
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tiels_r_cool:
[nq:1]I'm thinking of buying a budgerigar for my girlfriend - but she has asthma and I don't want to make that worse. Will the budgie irritate her asthma please?[/nq]
Get a air purifier as well to collect the dander and it will probaly be tolerable unless she is really allergic.
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SWalfoort:
Why don't you find a way to take her to a pet store, interact with a budgie, and find out.
For the record, I am allergic to cats, dogs, horses and the like. I also react badly to my sister's cockatiel. But, I have had zero problem with my four birds, which are non-dander birds (conures, mini macaw and macaw).

So, birds might be an option. Check out the pet store (or breeder) and see what happens.
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AFLane:
I have allergy induced asthma, and can only share the advice of my allergist and my avian vet. I've been instructed to stay away from high dust producing birds. Some of those would be cockatoos, cockatiels, budgerigars, and african greys. Unfortunately (or is fortunately), I decided to go ahead and adopt an african grey from the rescue that I work at (volunteer). I was advised by my avian vet to give my grey frequent mistings, to try to rinse away some of the dust/dander. Water just doesn't penetrate his feathers very well, but he seems to like his showers. Emotion: smile
How does he affect my asthma... I'm willing to accept an occasional attack so far they've been fairly mild. I have more severe attacks when I go outside on high pollen days. I'm willing to deal with the bird induced asthma, cause I love the bird THAT much. Emotion: smile
Would I recommend getting a budgie (or any bird) as a gift for someone... absolutely no. You don't know if your girlfriend is willing to have bird induced allergy problems. It's a HUGE health risk to impose. I agree with others that have replied to your inquiry... talk to your girlfriend, take her to a bird store, and see how she's going to physically react.

Good luck...
Amy
P.S. If you get an air purifier, stay away from the ionic air purifiers... there have been some not so good findings on the electrostatically charged dust and air particles.
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tiels_r_cool:
[nq:1]P.S. If you get an air purifier, stay away from the ionic airpurifiers... there have been some not so good findings on the electrostatically charged dust and air particles.[/nq]
Know what the not so good findings are by chance? They seem pretty cool from what I know. All the dust and dander will fall to the floor and cant be kicked back up, just sweep it up..
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AFLane:
If I remember correctly, it charges the dust and dirt particles with a negative ion charge, which helps them adhere to surfaces (therefore lack of airborne particles and irritants) and more importantly they also adhere to lungs. People are finding that when they use the ionic purifiers, their walls were getting a dingy grey/black coating negatively charged dirt was adhering to the walls. Also, the ionic air "purifiers" also create ozone... high levels are definitely NOT recommended for humans (especially with respiratory issues) and avians. Please note, this info is all from memory... I'd do a web search for article links for you, but I'm at work right now, and am a little pressed for time. (sorry).

I do know that HEPA air purifiers with replaceable filters are recommended by allergists, and are bird-safe.
Amy
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gritstone:
These are really helpful; thanks all.
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