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I have never had to "rehome" a pet bird, thank goodness, although I have adopted a few birds from people who could no longer keep them. A friend has lost her job, must move out ot town to live with her son, and cannot keep her zebra finches. She's asking around to try to give them away, but so far has no takers. I can't take them from her, as my 4 birds are enough for my lifestyle. I can find only one bird club in the Columbus Ohio area, so have provided that link to her, but is there anything else I can suggest for her? If any of you have had success in placing birds in another home, or know of a resource to help, will you please respond? Thank you. Becky
By UsenetStarlight  
 
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I'm the novice, but proud owner of two male parakeets; I've written to this group not that long ago. Having the birds now for about two to three months, I am beginning to wonder about their "social skills." I've read two books about these birds, and embedded within the text of the books, there are some pictures of children (as well as adults) with their parakeets perched on their hands or fingers, as the child seemingly pets the bird. When I first decided to get a parakeet, (obviously) I bought just one; but then I 'got to thinkin' that it might be lonely; so I got another one, another male. Always a bird lover, I have had some sort of 'relationship' with these creatures for a long time, but this has always been by afar I have liked to feed them with various kinds of bird feeders. I have even developed my own means of making the feeders "squirrel proof." Now, I have these two birds, and I am alone except for them. There is no one else here to intimidate them or whatever some people might be expected to do. But, yet, if I should get up from my "favorite chair" to do 'whatever,' or even to check their water, feed, cage, etc., I am met with a quick fleet towards the back perch of the cage. I take good care of these birds; I try talking with them in a non- threatening way, such as one would approach an infant child. They have been out of the cage but twice, in spite of the fact that I keep the front door open when I am sitting, reading, which is what I usually do (television has 'turned into' nothing but a bunch of silly reality shows that are anything but real); and because I am limited in what I can do (severe back problems), the birds can usually see me where I sit. But, although I have been non-threatening, they remain in a constant state of "Red" or "Yellow" alert when I approach them. Is this normal? When should I expect them to "know me?" Thanks, Mark
By UsenetMea505  
 
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After nearly three years of caring for two cockatiels, I have learned that I may be allergic to them. Although my allergist suggests permanently removing the birds from my home, I would rather test his theory by finding a temporary home for them for three to five months to see if my symptoms improve. Ping and Squawker entered my home as babies in January of 2005. They are very healthy and family friendly birds. My 9 & 10 year old daughters often play with them, including taking showers with them! Although their wings have been clipped in the past, they are now accustomed to flying about the room. The foster family will receive a cage, stand, all of their toys/ perches, plus all of the seeds & substrate in my possession at the time they are moved. If my symptoms have not improved in three months, I will want to take the birds back. If my symptoms improve in three months, but only slightly; I will want to extend the time period the birds are out of the house (2 more months). If my symptoms have changed significantly in three months, I will need to find a permanent home for them, approaching the foster family first. Please hit me off list if you are interested. The birds currently live in Evanston, IL.
By Usenetbeck  
 
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Hi everyone. I just purchased a wonderful male canary on Friday. He's been singing away so I hope that means he's happy. I've had parakeets in the past and decided to try something different. I also have 3 cats so I had to wait until a time when I had a place to put a cage that was inaccessible to the felines. He seems to eat a lot. He goes back and forth from his canary mix to his millet spray. But I provided a slice of apple and some kernels of corn and he didn't touch them. Is that normal? Can canaries be picky eaters and maybe he just won't like certain things that I've read canaries like? Thanks, Lydia
By UsenetLydia  
 
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What makes people buy a budgie and a cafe?? Supply food and water and that's it. I saw this poor bird sitting in his cage with no toys, a small mirror that was laying on the floor of the cage. I asked the ownerif I can bring a toy on my next visit. That was accepted and I plan on doing more but I want to do it gradually so not to offend the owner.
By Usenetkayla  
 
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Tell me those who own and know the parakeet: I have two, so they obviously have bonded. When are they going to get used to me? Is it such an awkward variable, determined by too many factors, or am I missing something. I mean, I take care of these birds. I even leave the cage open most of the time when I am here; but they don't always come out I think I can count the times without taking off a mitten or a shoe. Thanks, Mark
By UsenetMea505  
 
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Hi, I recently moved. I have two budgies. One of them has started sleeping at the top of the cage and I'm concerned. I thought it was cold, so I doubled the blanket I cover them with. But she's still doing it. I thought it might be the vent across the room (low heat), so I turned it off overnight when it was warm, but didn't solve it. Any ideas? Thanks!
By UsenetAnonymous  
 
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Hi all: I have been trying, using all kinds of methods, to introduce my parakeets to fruit; I went down to the local "Wal-Mart," that place where I own the "W," and I got a very small package of fresh fruit mixture. They will not go near it. I am pretty sure they are getting used to me and my presence, because when (not that often yet) they do find the courage to leave the cage, they "sometimes" allow me to let them perch on a finger and we get to the cage, where I drop them off. I am doing this for a while, so they can get used to the idea that I pose no threat; but I wonder how long this memory exists in a bird..? I mean, how large and sophisticated is the memory center for these creatures, or are most of their actions, with the exception of flying well, innate? Thanks, Mark
By UsenetMea505  
 
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I have found a local breeder that sells hand-fed budgies and I am interested in getting two.They are just beginning to get their feathers and I am trying to decide which ones I want. At what age will it be possible to tell the males and females apart, will it be several weeks or will it be shortly after they're weaned? (They are either common green or blue and white so no fancy colors to make the situation more difficult.) I already have two males so I would like to either get two more or two females so I don't have a 3:1 ratio. Thanks, Jacqui
By UsenetJacqui  
 
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Hello , I am writting to see if anyone can help me ,. My baby parakeet can not sit on a perch , she is 4 months old and out of the nest , but she just sits on the bottom of the cage , I have worked with her every day and try to help her learn how to perch , but she just falls off . When she moves across the bottom of the cage she uses her legs to help push her along but does not ever stand up on her legs .What could be wrong with her ??
By UsenetAnonymous  
 
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Hello all: I am, by no means, an experienced bird enthusiast; but I have always loved them. I have feeders outside that are literally "squirrel proof" that permits the birds to feed with problems. But, this post concerns a specific issue with respect to two parakeets that I now own. I have been watching their behavior (two males) quite closely of late. It "seems" to me as if one of the birds has become the "dominant" player in the "society," which is the cage and two birds. There are specific times when both of the birds can be seen eating; but there are other times when one of the birds (the one I will call the dominant one) that lets off this "almost barking sound" that tends to keep the other one at bay while the dominant one is seen eating. In the back of the cage, in an effort to rectify the problem, I have a mirror that is attached to a small tray, which is intended to be used for food. Small as it is compared to the food tray in the front of the cage, the "non-dominant" bird usually (when not permitted to eat from the larger tray in front of the cage) eats from that small tray. There is yet another device that is attached to the side of the cage; it holds a large tube, which contains feed, along with an accompanying tray into which the food from the tube drops when the tray is emptied by birds consuming the food. I have tried using small pieces of banana, placed in the tray for the birds, but they act as if it is a foreign (and therefore, threatening) material and I have yet to see them even niblble on the fruit. I am doing this because most of the material I have read thus far indicates that feeding the birds "only seed" is not good for the health of the birds. I have some apple, which I have yet to try. I always ensure that the fruit is cut into small pieces. Any advice from those who have or have had parakeets? Thanks, Mark
By UsenetMea505  
 
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Hi all: I have posted on this group in the past; but I consider myself a novice. One will see this when they read my questions: When I initially purchased my budgie, which, according to the proprietor, was called a 'rare parakeet,' although I couldn't understand the reason for this title, as it was not only the most common there, but also the least expensive. In any event, the salesperson informed me that it would be best to have it wings clipped; well, I did and now I seem to regret doing so. The only reason for this is that I purchased another one (to facilitate a friendship) and totally forgot all about the wing-clipping and he didn't mention it. Now that I have one with its wing's clipped and one without, am I misinformed to think that these feathers grow back to their original configuration, enabling the first bird to, once again, fly? It is able to make the 'swoop' down to the floor, but once there, it does not have the ability to fly up more than a few inches from the floor. Seeing this, it seems sad to me in a way; it's almost as if I allowed someone to remove a part of the bird that makes the bird, well, a bird. The other parakeet, the one without its wings clipped, is able to do things the first one cannot. I can only assume that each bird is but aware of each of its own limitations, and this only makes the situation worse, from my standpoint. I am disabled myself; I suffer from a great deal of back pain and I cannot ambulate without some sort of assistive device, at least not in any distance. I live alone; I live in a RV; and the birds actually love their existence, I think. When I consider my own limitations, I cannot but think of my bird's own limitations with respect to its ability to fly. And this is why I ask the question. Behavior of the birds is actually quite amazing. There are times when one of them seems to "bark" with a loud and distinctive voice, and then I think that there is trouble between the two, because I think that one is trying to use his begotton role as the dominant bird. But, when I look at them, there is no fighting; only a passive communication amongst the birds, one that I am not sure with respect to its meaning. Is this a sign of being angry? When I make the reference to a "bark," I am being a little over-dramatic. It's more like a high-pitched sing-song of sorts, but, in of itself, yet, peculiar. I have read at least four different books about these lovely creatures, but I have found no reference to this. But, I regress. My main point in posting this message is the reference to the feathers. Is this a permanent 'fixture,' one that will be lost forever; or can I assume that feathers will, in time, grow out in their place to accomodate flight? Thanks for the time, Mark
By UsenetMea505  
 
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[nq:1]If Alex didn't like the life he had he had the option of just sinking his beak into Irene P.'s hand and refusing to play her games.[/nq] He bonded to Dr.Pepperberg, he loved her, and propably could not hurt her even if he wanted to. She no doubt loved him too but he was also a reaserch subject to her. This film illustrates what I am talking about. Poor little plucker Alex tells her six times that he's got enough but she persists at him, forcing him, even with body contact, as she nears a big tray towards his leg in order to elicit a response from him. No wonder he died pre-maturely. Wt8I M.J.
By UsenetM.J.  
 
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Hello all: I am a relatively new member to this group. I have two parokeets, both male, that are permitted to leave their cage from time to time and enjoy outside of the cage environs. Recently, I saw a software program that has the ability to either create a (rather large) loop of parokeets that can be used on a computer but this program was also designed to help a user teach a parokeet to sing or even talk. However, I seemed to have lost the link to this web site and have had no luck in trying to find it. Does anyone out there in "The Blue Nowhere" know of any specific sites that will address this or even other issues? Thanks, Mark
By UsenetMea505  
 
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Hello all: I posted a message yesterday and received some excellent advice. However, I want to ask a question of those who have owned or have either parrot or parakeet, or, perhaps both. In a book entitled, Parakeets, written by Moustaki and published (or underwritten by Animal Planet), I was informed that the parrot is much like the parakeet, except for distinguishing features: size is obviously one of them; but there is also differences in the wing span and the tail. What the book does not mention (to any satisfying degree) is the ability to mimic some words, such as is often heard about when one thinks of the parrot. Is it common for one to expect a parakeet to be trained to mimic words? Also: I might be interested in either getting some plans for an aviary or buying a kit; this will be for indoors, not outdoors. Does anyone on this list have access to such information? Is an aviary superior for a parakeet over a cage? Thanks, Mark
By UsenetMea505  
 
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