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Hi folks, I've read there are some foods that cockatiels (and i presume all parrots) should not be given, like avocado & chocolate. Is there a known safe/unsafe foods list maintained somewhere that is a little more extensive? The main foods that brought this question up for me are dried dates and certain wholegrain wheat breakfast cereals, which our cockatiel seems to enjoy eating with our family at the breakfast table. I don't want to continue giving them if they're bad for him... Thanks, Paul
By UsenetPaul Gear  
 
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Group, I am looking for help with feeding Eclectus chicks from someone that has first hand experience feeding Eclectus chicks. I have raised Amazon chicks for several years now and have had no difficulty. I love the thrill of taking that little baby and feeling it pulse in my hand while I feed it. As the chick grows, a bond seems to be made between the chick and myself. As the chick becomes larger it becomes more and more interested in me feeding it. At the weaning age it will still open it's beak and advance towards me to be fed by me. It is this connection that I have used to make every chick that I have ever raised become a totally trusting and sweet little fellow that likes all other gentle human hand and thus being a great pet for it's owner.I fed my first Eclectus chick the same as my Amazons with a little 1CC syringe and he took it right down, He bobbed and vibrated with happiness as the food went down. It was just like feeding Amazons until about 6 weeks when things started to change. At first I noticed that I needed to put the syringe tip into the beak to start feeding. The chick did not mind and consumed the food ok, no more head bobbing just swallowed. Soon there became an actual reluctance of both chicks to be fed having to chase the fellows down in order to feed him. After fasting all night and being most empty they act ambivalent about weather they want fed or not. This degrading of interest kept increasing. I continued to give them love, and time while eating but otherwise it finally came down to pushing the food into the chick while the chick is trying to escape my clutch and this is most frustrating to me at least. The chicks however have not become afraid of me and will advance at me as if looking to be fed until I touch them to feed them and then the fight is on. They are now eating on there own and all seems to have ended well. They each way 395 grams (first weight of the day). They come out of the cage snuggle in my hand and are quite eager to take vegetables and pellets from my hand. They seem like they will make both great and tame pets. Now my frustration is I am now feeding these two birds younger siblings. They are aggressively bobbing and sucking the syringes right down. You might think they were trying to eat my hand at times. I am not looking forward to having this wonderful time go the way it did on the last chicks when they reach the same age. If you feed Eclectus chicks could you please tell me if it just this way or if I am doing something wrong. How do you feed your chicks and how are you doing it? Thanks, Bruce PS: thanks to toughs that provided general information about Eclectus chicks when I posted earlier. It was helpful to understand that this my be the nature of Eclectus.
By UsenetAnonymous  
 
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Group, I am looking for help with feeding Eclectus chicks from someone that has first hand experience feeding Eclectus chicks. I have raised Amazon chicks for several years now and have had no difficulty. I love the thrill of taking that little baby and feeling it pulse in my hand while I feed it. As the chick grows, a bond seems to be made between the chick and myself. As the chick becomes larger it becomes more and more interested in me feeding it. At the weaning age it will still open it's beak and advance towards me to be fed by me. It is this connection that I have used to make every chick that I have ever raised become a totally trusting and sweet little fellow that likes all other gentle human hands and thus being a great pet for it's owner.I fed my first Eclectus chick the same as my Amazons with a little 1CC syringe and he took it right down, He bobbed and vibrated with happiness as the food went down. It was just like feeding Amazons until about 6 weeks when things started to change. At first I noticed that I needed to put the syringe tip into the beak to start feeding. The chick did not mind and he consumed the food ok, no more head bobbing, just swallowed. Soon there became an actual reluctance of both chicks to be fed having to chase the fellows down in order to feed him. After fasting all night and being most empty they act ambivalent about weather they want fed or not. This degrading of interest kept increasing. I continued to give them love, and time while eating but otherwise it finally came down to pushing the food into the chick while the chick is trying to escape my clutch and this is most frustrating to me at least. The chicks however have not become afraid of me and will advance at me as if looking to be fed until I touch them to feed them and then the fight is on. They are now eating on there own and all seems to have ended well. They each way 395 grams (first weight of the day). They come out of the cage snuggle in my hand and are quite eager to take vegetables and pellets from my hand. They seem like they will make both great and tame pets. Now my frustration is I am now feeding these two bird's younger siblings(18 days). They are aggressively bobbing and sucking the syringes right down. You might think they were trying to eat my hand off at times. I am not looking forward to having this wonderful time go the way it did on the last chicks when they reach the same age. If you feed Eclectus chicks could you please tell me if it just this way or if I am doing something wrong. How do you feed your chicks and how are you doing it? Thanks, Bruce PS: thanks to toughs that provided general information about Eclectus chicks when I posted earlier. It was helpful to understand that this my be the nature of Eclectus.
By UsenetAnonymous  
 
3
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Our grey is about 11 years old. It has been a great pet for that long, but has started biting making it difficult for us to take it out of its cage. We can't figure out why. We are in a position have considering giving it away. Any ideas?
By UsenetBig Crunch  
 
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We recently bought a 1 1/2 year old quaker. She has quite quickly attached herself to my wife. From everything I've read, this is reasonably normal quaker behavior. However, she is very aggressive towards me and our sons (19+ y.o.). Lots of snapping beaks..more than a little bloodshed on our part. And despite the frequent use of treats (primarily by me), this behavior has gotten worse rather than better. We've been working in a sort of tag team to try and get her socialized with more than one person. Typically we do this on neutral ground. (i.e. away from her cage.) We figured out that there were some elevation issues as she is much more aggressive when she is above us. We we minimize those issues as best we can. Any thoughts?? Regards, Dann blogging at [link] Freedom works; each and every time it is tried.
By UsenetDann  
 
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I'm sure Dr. Pepperberg is absolutely devastated. It's sad to hear about Alex's death. Farewell to a famous parrot Alex, who could talk and count, dies at 31. David Chandler Good friends: Alex's death was the "worst day" of owner and researcher Pepperberg's life. David Chandler "You be good," said Alex last Thursday night. "I love you. See you tomorrow." But by the next morning Alex, who was 31, was dead of unknown causes. It was "the worst day of my life", says Irene Pepperberg of Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, the researcher who was Alex's owner and trainer. Alex was an African grey parrot that Pepperberg bought in a pet store 30 years ago. By the time of his death last Friday, he had a confirmedvocabulary of more than 100 English words that he could apparently understand and use correctly, rather than merely 'parroting' them. Pepperberg has published dozens of scientific papers about Alex's verbal, mathematical and cognitive abilities, and the two have appeared on a wide variety of television programmes and popular press stories. In the process, they have transformed people's understanding of the mental abilities of non-human animals. A necropsy performed over the weekend found no apparent cause of death. Alex had seemed in fine health the day before, and no problems were found in a checkup less than two weeks earlier. Bird brain Besides apparently understanding the meanings of the words he uttered, Alex, whose name was an acronym for Avian Learning EXperiment, could also correctly count up to six (identifying the number of objects on a tray and correctly linking the number he said aloud to the written numeral). He could also identify colours, shapes and materials of various objects. And, occasionally, he could even coin new words to describe an unfamiliar object; he called an apple a "banerry" the first time he was presented with one, perhaps because its outside was the colour of the more familiar cherry, and the inside the colour of banana. Pepperberg's research remains controversial, with some skeptics maintaining that Alex's apparent mastery of language revealed nothing more than a very sophisticated version of conditioned responses. Pepperberg says that is hard to reconcile with such findings as Alex's 80% accuracy in counting objects. In her peer-reviewed papers, she has said that he seemed to have intelligence comparable to a five-year-old child, but emotional behaviour more like a two-year-old. For example, when frustrated or annoyed, Alex would sometimes give wrong answers to all of the questions put to him - a result that Pepperberg argued could not be due to chance, but required knowing all the right answers and refusing to give them, as a petulant child might do. Losing Alex The research will continue, Pepperberg says, but "losing Alex is a huge issue" that will set back her planned work, including a new grant for research on parrots' perception of optical illusions. "We do have two more birds," she says, who have been through years of training. But their language abilities lag far behind what Alex displayed. The second-oldest, a 12-year-old parrot named Griffin, has mastered fully only 20 words, and is still working on full comprehension of 12 more. For example, when asked the colour of an object, he will always answer with the name of a colour, but not necessarily the right one, so those words are not yet counted as part of his fully understood vocabulary. When asked to summarize the impact of her three decades of parrot research, Pepperberg says "people think much more seriously about the intellectual abilities of these feathered creatures." She says her work has influenced other groups who have since investigated the intelligence of other birds, including crows. "I like to think that being called a birdbrain is now a compliment." Pepperberg says they have not yet settled on any plans for a funeral or other ceremony.
By UsenetLisa Lisa  
 
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As I am searching through the google groups it is interesting that there are so many post on candles and some great discounts for those who are selling. I really didn't really expect to see so much information regarding this topic. Personally every room in my house is full of candles, they are a great way to set a mood or sometimes I just light them all up and relax in the calming tranquility. I have enjoyed reading your post and will return when I have more time to check out the rest of your threads. Rosalynn Muhammad Candles of Eden [link]
By UsenetAnonymous  
 
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We are deeply saddened to announce Alex died this morning of unknown causes. We will have a formal press release on Monday when we know the cause of death. He was absolutely fine yesterday and he was found dead this morning. Dr. Pepperberg will take the weekend to mourn his death. We hope to have more information on Monday We miss him so much. Thank you, Arlene Levin-Rowe - Pepperberg Lab Manager and the Pepperberg Lab Staff
By UsenetNathan Schulman  
 
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I cant seem to find an airline carrier that has a divider in it? I want fit my 2 birds, but they cant be together, there has to be a divider. Anyone know a site?
By UsenetObscured  
 
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I have looked through the web abd found only sites that want to sell material; but I am looking for some good material about the proper care for a parakette. I just bought one, after having two finches being eaten by a snake. When I bought this parakette, the salesperson at "PetSmart" told me that if I bought one, it would bond with me; if I bought two, they would bond together. However, I have the feeling that although this sounds logical, my parakette is without a "friend." Should I therefore, get another one? I have a male; I would much rather get another male, if it is wise(r) to have two than one, or if it is more appropriate to have a pair than just one. Could anyone direct me to a site on the Internet that has information about parakettes that is, well, free? Everyone is trying to make a buck; but I am not willing to pay the high prcies for the texts that they sell. Also does one "cover" the cage at night? Thanks, Mark
By Usenetmea305  
 
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Good day all! Well Im moving! And I have two wonderful birds! Parrots. Please does anyone know the process, what I need to do, what airline, and so on and so forth is the best for transporting my birds. I prefer to take them as carry on. Is this possible? Anyone done this before?
By UsenetObscured  
 
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I was reading today that Leona Helmsley left like 15 million to her dog. I got to thinking can you imagine if Bill Gates died and left his entire fortune to a talking parrot? I mean think about it, putting the bird on the cover of fortune magazine with the caption (This bird has more money than Donald Trump)
By Usenetjalexa9898  
 
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Hi all, Here's a video of my cockatiel: [link] He does this funny little crouch thing usually no more than once every 1-3 days, usually in the middle of the day, and usually while it is fairly quiet in his environment. When he's doing it, he's a lot more vocal when i stroke his back (as shown in the video), but he will vocalise a bit just on his own. He is happy to be touched almost anywhere on his body while he is doing this, whereas when he is not doing it, he only likes being touched on his head & neck. Is this a mating ritual, or something else? Thanks, Paul
By UsenetPaul Gear  
 
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What's a good budgie & parakeet food ( we have both an english budgie and a couple of parakeets ) that won't break the piggy bank?
By UsenetMoon Goddess  
 
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I will soon be adopting a green cheeked amazon. What would this bird be considered size wise for buying toys, medium, large or XL? I am thinking large. Also, any thoufghts on these birds? I
By Usenet  
 
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