Birds and paint fumes

This is a discussion thread · 5 replies
pianoharp:
Hello,
We'll probably do some painting indoors pretty soon, and I intend to house my canary at the neighbor's. How many days do you recommend waiting after the fumes are gone before bringing him back? I know they can smell and be affected by fumes that we can't; I've read about the use of canaries in mines to detect gases and such. I just don't want to bring him back when we can't smell the fumes anymore and voila ... a dead bird!

What's your experience with this and small songbirds?

- pianoharp
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Chuck Chopp:
[nq:1]Hello, We'll probably do some painting indoors pretty soon, and I intend to house my canary at the neighbor's. How ... we can't smell the fumes anymore and voila ... a dead bird! What's your experience with this and small songbirds?[/nq]
A further question to go along with the above... At the Sherwin Williams paint store, there is a product available called "Odor Zap" (has a skunk on the label) that is used to reduce/eliminate the odor of latex paint. I have used it before and I can attest to the fact that it works - the smell of the fresh paint was greatly reduced and didn't last as long as untreated latex paint. However, I have no idea if this would reduce the toxicity of the fumes w/respect to avians.
Chuck
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Momma Soke':
[nq:1]Hello, We'll probably do some painting indoors pretty soon, and I intend to house my canary at the neighbor's. How many days do you recommend waiting after the fumes are gone before bringing him back?[/nq]
Call the mfr of your paint and ask them. I'd back it up with a call to the vet. I've not painted since we got the birds but that's where I'd start.

Ma
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Andee:
It depends on the type of paint you are using. Latex does not have any lethal fumes, but it might be better to keep the bird away for 24 hours until the house is aired out. Oil based paint is three days with ventilation, I have been told by an avian vet. I spot paint the walls all the time and small amounts of latex do not any of the birds. If you are doing only one room with latex, you could shut that room off and the bird would be OK in some other room.
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jmcquown:
[nq:2]Hello, We'll probably do some painting indoors pretty soon, and ... waiting after the fumes are gone before bringing him back?[/nq]
[nq:1]Call the mfr of your paint and ask them. I'd back it up with a call to the vet. I've not painted since we got the birds but that's where I'd start. Ma[/nq]
What a timely post! And excellent suggestions. I'm thinking about painting one wall in my apartment where the fireplace is and worried about what to do with Peaches. I could take her to my brothers house for a few days but wonder how long I would need to leave her there. So I'll call the paint mfg. and her vet to inquire.
Jill
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Mean Guy:
Right up my ally
I have been painting for a good while now.
There are some latex enamels that could harm youy or your bird. The less shine the less lethal.
Latex paint takes a good while to really cure sometimes 2 weeks. It will surface dry a long time before it fully cures.
Having said that I would keep the bird away for 24 hrs, minimum if you are using latex enamel.
Oil or laquer at least 72 hours.
Good luck
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