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chris:
He is 1 year old. He growls and bites (not hard ) to avoid going in the crate. He has always gone in there up till now. He is obviously testing everyone (except me). Sometimes he even resists with me. But he doesn't put up much of a fight. I am afraid he will when he gets bigger. I am the man of the house. He has recognized me as alpha. This does not happen when I am around. Me and my wife did a little test.

I pretended like I was leaving for work and went outside and started my truck. Then I snuck up to the door and listened as my wife tried to put him in the crate. He was growling and biting. Then I went inside and he stopped the growling and went in the crate. I thought about a muzzle. So that will help with the biting. But he overpowers everyone except me right now. What to do? Thanks
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culprit:
[nq:1]He is 1 year old. He growls and bites (not hard ) to avoid going in the crate. He has ... muzzle. So that will help with the biting. But he overpowers everyone except me right now. What to do? Thanks[/nq]
i'd recommend having your wife and kids take him to some obedience training. a good trainer will be able to watch their body language and help your family correct any mistakes they may be making, and your dog just might learn some manners in the process. :-)
-kelly
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Anonymous:
[nq:1]He is 1 year old. He growls and bites (not hard ) to avoid going in the[/nq]
You need a skilled experienced trainer immediately. It was a bad idea to ever allow it to get to the point of a first time of teeth on human. And waiting for multiple occurences beofre seeking help was an even worse idea. This is not something you are likely to solve on your own, and trying will get someone seriously injured and your dog killed. Do not continue putting the dog in the position for making a deadly mistake. It isn't fair to anyone.
http://dog-play.com/growling.html

Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com /
http://dogplay.com/Shop /
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michael 2.3:
[nq:1]He is 1 year old. He growls and bites (not hard ) to avoid going in the crate. He has ... muzzle. So that will help with the biting. But he overpowers everyone except me right now. What to do? Thanks[/nq]
If you continue with the overpowering bit, someone, possibly multiple people, are going to get bit. Hard. And then you'll come here and tell us about it, and our local "experts" will tell you to murder your dog, because it's not "safe" or "responsible" to rehome a "biter."

"Most dog bites are caused by too much aggression. By the human"
Michael Patton

this is michael
reporting live...
http://dogtv.com
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R Meyer:
[nq:1]He is 1 year old. He growls and bites (not hard ) to avoid going in the crate. He has ... muzzle. So that will help with the biting. But he overpowers everyone except me right now. What to do? Thanks[/nq]
Your adolescent dog, for whatever reason, dislikes the crate. He only goes in there when forced`, so it's not a place he wants to be in. You say "he doesn't put up much of a fight". What do you mean by "fight"? Do you tell and/or coax him to go inside the crate, or do you use physical force? Does he resist your wife in other situations as well, or is the crate his only concern?
Growling and biting is not the real problem here, although it is what's troubling you. The problem is whatever causes him to growl and bite. Putting on a muzzle won't solve the underlying problem, and you might forever lose the trust of your dog. If the crate is the only problem, find a way to make him like being in there, or stop using it.

You may find the bood "The dog listener" by Jan Fennel useful. She is a well known dog behaviourist in the UK.
Amazon has it at
ka 1/104-0501808-5579957?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

Rox
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Melinda Shore:
[nq:1]You may find the bood "The dog listener" by Jan Fennel useful.[/nq]
To put under the leg of a wobbly table.
The problems Fennel encounters all have the same diagnosis and the same cure. Funny, eh? In the situation to which you're responding, they need to find a good trainer or behaviorist to work with. It's a dangerous situation and not one that can be fixed by reading a book.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Stephen Hawking is a flip-flopper.
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B. Parker:
[nq:1]If you continue with the overpowering bit, someone, possibly multiple people, are going to get bit. Hard. And then you'll ... our local "experts" will tell you to murder your dog, because it's not "safe" or "responsible" to rehome a "biter."[/nq]
Well written Michael unfortunately too few people can read and comprehend.
Dear Chris,
You dog is not "testing" anyone.
Nor is he trying to push the limits of his authority. Nor is he trying to dominate anyone or anything.
Nor is he trying to be "alpha."
Take whatever books you have been reading and send this 2 day ground to the Appalachian Trail Committee. Recommend to the ATC that your books be used as toilet paper in trail-side outhouses.

Then sit back look at your dog and ask him to tell you about his problem (don't expect him to speak that would be silly).

Pay attention and he will let you know that . . . . (are you ready for the big finish??) . . . .
He is stressed out and he is respond to that stress in a natural pre-programed manner. He hasn't snapped at you (yet) because his level of stress has not overcome his fear of you.
Your dog's reaction is EXACTLY the same as a dog that obsessively barks in his crate, obsessively licks, pees on the floor if you try and force him, or gives someone good reason to invest in 40 or 50 stiches. These are just different reactions to stress.

If you try to force the dog . . . you make things worse. If you try typical Woodhouse, Keohler, Killcommons, Skunks of New something or other, type "corrections" you are making the matter worse.
This situation is a problem of your own making (Of course, I don't think you did it on purpose I am sure you want only the best for this animal, else you would not post on RPDB).
Nonetheless, I am starting to tire . . . . If you Chris, or anyone else, is actually interested in getting some positive advice for fixing this problem please respond . . . . or even better yet, think hard about it and post some good advice.
Until then I am tired of writing the same *** over and over again. See generally, about 48,000 earlier posts by me, canis55, The Master, etc.
Cheers,
Parker
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chris:
Like I said before he will go in if I am around. Otherwise, my wife or son will have to try and wrestle him in there. I would love to leave him out of the crate so he has more freedom. But I will have a bunch of things chewed and destroyed.
[nq:2]He is 1 year old. He growls and bites (not ... me). Sometimes he even resists with me. But he doesn't[/nq]
[nq:1]put[/nq]
[nq:2]up much of a fight. I am afraid he will when he gets bigger. I am theman[/nq]
[nq:1]of[/nq]
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0060089466/qid=1090756507/sr=8-1/ref=pd ka 1/104-0501808-5579957?v=glance&s=books&n=507846
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R Meyer:
[nq:1]Like I said before he will go in if I am around. Otherwise, my wife or son will have to ... him outof the crate so he has more freedom. But I will have a bunch of things chewed and destroyed.[/nq]
Chris,
There are ways to deal with chewing that do not include confinement or physical force. Chewing is frequently a symptom of stress, and may also be related to too little or too much activity/stimulation. Books and behaviourists may be able to help you, but you will have to accept that the crate or the chewing isn't where the problem stems from. Treating the symptoms won't solve the problems that are the underlying cause for the behaviour.
The first thing I'd try would be to remove all movable, forbidden chewables. Then provide him with allowed chewables. If he gets too little stimulation and/or exersise, then walk him more and play with him. Let him run without a leash in safe areas. You should also provide him with a "safe haven" in the house, where he is guaranteed not to be bothered when he rests.
Make sure your wife and son feed him and walk him as much as you do, and that you all follow the same set of household (or "doghold", if you like) rules. If the dog does something that he's not allowed to, make sure that your wife and son also correct him. Do not correct him yourself for unwanted behaviour that your wife/son experience. An efficient way of correcting the dog - for chewing, for example - is by telling him "no" in a firm but normal voice, and then offering him a chew toy that he likes better.

When he's not playing with that toy, you can keep it in a place he cannot reach. He'll soon learn to go to that place and beg for the toy when he wants to chew on something. And if a situation becomes tense, fake a huge yawn (a calming body signal for dogs) and walk away, completely ignoring him. Continue to ignore him until he himself initiates friendly contact in a calm manner. If he still seems a bit too stressed or pushy for your liking, yawn again and turn away.

You'll be surprised of how effective this is.

To avoid chewing when the dog is home alone, the easiest short term solution is to put the dog in a room where there's nothing he can destroy. But destruction - like obsessive barking and other unwanted behaviour - is a sign of stress, and a happy dog is far less likely to feel stressed about being alone.
Roxanne
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