Canned jack mackerel OK for cats ?

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Knack:
I can get it locally for only .00 per 15 ounce (425g) can. It has a light tomtato gravy, but no vegetable oil. Like canned salmon, it includes bones that are somehow softened by the heating-canning process. Contains lots of protein, calcium, and fish oil. Comes from Chile.

Just wondering about its magnesium content. Keep in mind that a jack mackerel is only a 11" (28cm) fish that doesn't live for anywhere near as long as a tuna.
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PawsForThought:
This is a cooked human food? I would only give it to a cat as an occasional treat, not as his regular diet. Cats have very specific nutritional needs very different from our own.
Lauren

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm
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GreyTabbyLover:
>[/nq]
Could have some as a treat once in a while.
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J1Boss:
I get it for as little as $ .75 (dollar stores and such). I've never offered it to my cats but my dogs get it as a change on their diet once every 2 weeks or so. The dogs love it. The cats haven't shown any interest in the dog's bowls when it's served. Maybe they just know they're supposed to eat their own food, but it may be that it doesn't appeal to them as well!

Janet Boss
Best Friends Dog Obedience
"Nice Manners for the Family Pet"
Voted "Best of Baltimore 2001" - Baltimore Magazine www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
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Alison Perera:
[nq:1]This is a cooked human food? I would only give it to a cat as an occasional treat, not as his regular diet. Cats have very specific nutritional needs very different from our own.[/nq]
Lauren, do you supplement omega-3 fatty acids? If so, how?

Personally, I feed my cats the occasional meal of canned oily fish: salmon or mackerel. Cheaper and more available than uncooked fish; more palatable; less prone to being contaminated by flukes (since we eat wild-caught Alaskan salmon in my household).
Yes, cooked human food.
Gasp. The horror.
To the OP: the tomato gravy would make me hesitate (what-all's in there?), and might turn your cats off too. Try to find the stuff packed in water which should be just as cheap; rinse it a bit to remove excess sodium before feeding.
Don't feed much at a time (the fat can cause the squirts in animals not used to it) and don't feed it too frequently (who knows why fish sometimes instigates urinary troubles but it does).

-Alison in OH
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Jeremy Lowe:
I would be hesitant about feeding with any regularity a specific fish. Mackerel can be a high source of Omega 3 fats, but it can also be high in mercury and PCBs depending on where it was caught.

If you want to get long chain fats in your cat then consider a supplement where the fish oil has been refined and microencapsulated to aid in digestion and prevent stomach upset.
Also at that price for a can of fish I would be highly suspect of the quality and cleanliness of the production facility!

Jeremy Lowe
www.healthypetnet.com/jeremy
Have you hugged your pet today?
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ChakaShiva:
"Jeremy Lowe" (Email Removed) a écrit dans le message de sW3vb.6005$[nq:1]I would be hesitant about feeding with any regularity a specific fish. Mackerel can be a high source of Omega 3 fats, but it can also be high in mercury and PCBs depending on where it was caught.[/nq]
Right.
Fish with highest mercury level : tilefish, swordfish, mackerel, shark, white snapper, tuna.
Lowest: salmon, flounder, sole, tilapia, trout.
USFDA, may 2001.
I give them once in a while sole and smelts.
Elaine
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PawsForThought:
I do use whole body fish oil in capsule form. I'm highly allergic to fish so I can't feed my cats any fish. My husband handles the fish oil Emotion: smile
[nq:1]Personally, I feed my cats the occasional meal of canned oily fish: salmon or mackerel. Cheaper and more available than uncooked fish; more palatable; less prone to being contaminated by flukes (since we eat wild-caught Alaskan salmon in my household). Yes, cooked human food.[/nq]
They say mackeral can be high in mercury and other contaminants, I guess depending on the source, but I don't think an occasional meal is going to hurt.
Lauren

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm
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Annie Wxill:
[nq:1]I can get it locally for only .00 per 15 ounce (425g) can. It has a light tomtato gravy, but ... has onions in the gravy, do not feed it to your cat. Onion can cause a dangerous anemia in cats.[/nq]
Annie
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