Escaped baby corn snake

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sabrine:
help!! my baby cornsnake escaped tree day's ago . he was in my bedroom but i left the door open so he can be anywhere upstairs . i left two pinkies in the halway . and i loked everywhere cant find hem do u have more tips to help find my baby cornsnake ? and would the snake be able to smell the to pinkies ?
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Chris Brown:
[nq:1]help!! my baby cornsnake escaped tree day's ago . he was in my bedroom but i left the door open ... tips to help find my baby cornsnake ? and would the snake be able to smell the to pinkies ?[/nq]
Put a thick layer of flour across all the doorways in your house, leave mice out, preferably near to nice dark places where he can hide after eating one (yes, he will be able to smell them). This should help you narrow down the location of your snake. Eventually, he'll probably turn up. Looking for him will probably be fruitless - they're better at hiding than you can possibly imagine.
One of mine got out a few months ago - I practically tore the house appart numerous times trying to find him. 2 days later, he just turned up in the living room.
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sabrine:
thanks for the information i going to try it out
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Shane MacIntyre:
[nq:1]Put a thick layer of flour across all the doorways in your house, leave mice out, preferably near to nice dark places where he can hide after eating one (yes, he will be able to smell them).[/nq]
Flour is a good idea, But I have had baby corns that can't find pinkies in their enclosure much less in a house. But maybe you will get lucky. Where do you live? If its cold in your area check the warm spots (under stove, near refrigerator motor, Laundry dryer, hotwater tank, near furnace) Start at the warm spots closest to the last place you had him and work out from there.
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JULIAN HALES:
[nq:2]Put a thick layer of flour across all the doorways ... eating one (yes, he will be able to smell them).[/nq]
[nq:1]Flour is a good idea, But I have had baby corns that can't find pinkies in their enclosure much less ... tank, nearfurnace) Start at the warm spots closest to the last place you had him and work out from there.[/nq]
check heat spots or put things down witd hides over.
found 50% of lost snakes. 1 was a year later much bigger in the garden about
5 houses away and the other someone found in the next St. both Bairds ratswhich are damn fast when small
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Jim Dep:
From what I've read, they like to climb. Look up in places like curtain rods in closets, etc.
Good Luck!!
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HerpLuver:
[nq:1]thanks for the information i going to try it out[/nq]
Follow the logical place it would go. I actually had a baby rattle snake escape in my house, but I caught it and released it outside. Where ever the cage is, follow what might be a logical path. For my rattlesnake case, for example, I knew which end he got out of because the lid was off. A snake would go for cover, so instead of looking around, he went straight, then up 3 stairs. To the left was a door, to the right was a door to my parents room. The light would .. scare him/he wants shelter. So he would go right. Using these clues, I found him curled up in the corner of my parents room. Which, strangely, is the coldest part of my house.
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Shane MacIntyre:
So he would go right. Using these clues, I
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Barbara:
I have had very bad luck finding escaped snakes, although Fr0glet seems to have the opposite. I try all the 'tricks', sometimes can see the trail they took, but the only one I ever recovered, recovered ME. He is a grown Honduran Milksnake, sold to me on the cheap due to his past escape record, which I ignored as I pride myself falsely on being very very vigilant. He spent the winter in my cellar, NOT at all warm, we found two full sheds and some spoor, and nothing else.

In the early spring, I was reading in the bathroom..mine is an old house and has those heating radiator baseboards with a million holes leading into the cellar..and found an 'extra' head peering out from behind my Nelson Milksnake's tank. It was Miguel, who I promptly re-incarcerated in his 40-long. Otherwise, I've lost only babies, as a result, I think, of a helper who never can quite get the hang of putting the lids to the containers back on right, so they click.

My 03's are in drawers, no problems there.

But my hunt, trap, and find methods seem to stink, however carefully I follow directions or instincts.
I'm reminded of something Carl Hiassen, snake person who wrote Skinny Dip, the popular book NOT about snakes, said in one of his Miami Herald columns. We give them food, warmth, water, shelter, and attention, in exchange for which they give us..total indifference.
I thought it was a funny line. Obviously they give us pleasure or we wouldn't have them.
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