Have 3 cats, getting a dog, advice needed

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Slapshot:
Greetings,
We have 3 cats (age 7), and are looking to get a dog. The cats have full run of the house, and are VERY independent from each other. 2 female cats & 1 male. The male is very docile (when he is not chasing the females), 1 of the females is very territorial and has been known to hiss and bang at the window if a stray comes near it, and will attack strange cats if given the oppurtunity. The other female is a loner attached to one family member only (myself), and needs constant attention (she is the house prima donna). All of them are indoor cats.
However my wife has always wanted to get a dog, and I am now giving it serious consideration. However I am very concerned about finding a breed that will not be aggressive with the cats. They were here first and I would not want them feeling too usurped:)
I know that the chemistry of the house will be thrown into chaos for a while regardless, but would like to minimize the impact.

So, what breeds should I look at and what should I stay away from? Have heard that malamutes should be avoided at all cost.

Some breeds I have been looking at are a Greyhound (Would adopt from the local track, something majestic about this breed I have always liked), Whippet (Family had one growing up, always loved this breed) or a Collie (again past experience with this breed). But am open to other suggestions.

Any thoughts or advice is appreciated. Sorry if the crosspost was off the mark, wanted to hit both groups to see what experiences people have had.

Many thanks,
Paul
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diddy:
[nq:1]Greetings, We have 3 cats (age 7), and are looking to get a dog. The cats have full run of ... crosspost was off the mark, wanted to hit both groups to see what experiences people have had. Many thanks, Paul[/nq]
If you would consider a breed such as malamute, then a breed such as Elkhound (hairy) shouldn't be out of line.
If a dog is raised with cats, there shouldn't be a problem anyway.
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Slapshot:
[nq:1]If you would consider a breed such as malamute, then a breed such as Elkhound (hairy) shouldn't be out of line.[/nq]
Actually I was discounting a malamute from what I had read on the breed (ie: they can consider cats a food source).
[nq:1]If a dog is raised with cats, there shouldn't be a problem anyway.[/nq]
That was the thought, which may discount getting an adult dog (ie: adopting a Greyhound) and going with a puppy.
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kilikini:
[nq:1]Greetings, We have 3 cats (age 7), and are looking to get a dog. The cats have fullrun of the ... crosspost was off the mark, wanted to hit both groups to see what experiences people have had. Many thanks, Paul[/nq]One thing to consider, all of the breeds you suggested are a little hyper which means it will be harder for the dog to contain his or herself. I have two cats and 9 months ago brought a 10 week old Australian Shepherd puppy into the family. He and the cats are still* trying to work it out. He wants to run and chase and the girls prefer lounging. A more mellow breed might work better to your advantage, like a labrador. I'm not saying that one of the breeds you prefer would *not work with your cats, but a working/running high strung animal may not be what you're looking for in this particular case.

(Especially if you're considering a retired Greyhound who is used to chasing a rabbit around a track. Rabbit could = cat to a Greyhound's brain.) Another option might be to get a more mellow puppy to get your cats used to having a dog around and then eventually add to your zoo by getting the type of dog you want. Two dogs is always good fun too.

kili

"Beer, the cause of, and solution to, all of life's problems." - - Homer Simpson
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elegy:
[nq:1]Greetings, We have 3 cats (age 7), and are looking to get a dog. The cats have full run of ... Sorry if the crosspost was off the mark, wanted to hit both groups to see what experiences people have had.[/nq]
if you're interested in getting a greyhound, i'd look into finding a good rescue that knows their dogs. with greyhounds they could look at cats as prey to be caught, especially if the cats are flighty around the dog and run. a rescue will be better able to find a dog to suit your household, having seen them in a (foster) "home" environment instead of just on the track.
i like greys a lot.
what else are you looking for in a dog other than cat-friendly?

"what does my body have to do
with my gratitude?" (ani d)
http://shattering.org
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Melinda Shore:
[nq:1]Diddy wrote[/nq]
[nq:2]If a dog is raised with cats, there shouldn't be a problem anyway.[/nq]
[nq:1]That was the thought, which may discount getting an adult dog (ie: adopting a Greyhound) and going with a puppy.[/nq]
Well, it depends. I've got four Siberian Huskies living in harmony with two cats. That only holds true when they're inside the house, though - if the cats get out into the dog yard, which has happened a couple of times, the dogs regard the cats as a likely food source. Incidentally, three of the dogs joined the household as adults. It was a gamble, though, and I wouldn't count on any given naturally predatory dog getting along well with cats. Of the breeds you listed, the collie is probably your best bet where the cats are concerned, plus they're just plain nice dogs.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Halliburton did more than $30 million dollars
business with Saddam in the late 1990s
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flick:
[nq:1]Greetings, We have 3 cats (age 7), and are looking to get a dog. The cats have fullrun of the ... Sorry if the crosspost was off the mark, wanted to hit both groups to see what experiences people have had.[/nq]
You should be able to find a cat-friendly adult dog through a humane society or rescue. Some dogs are given up by owners, and the org/rescue knows more about them than they do about a stray off the street.

Go to Petfinder, search for dogs available in your area; when you find those you're interested in, email to ask if the dog is cat-friendly, or if they have one that is.
flick 100785
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Chris Jung:
[nq:2]Some breeds I have been looking at are a Greyhound ... experience with this breed). But am open to othersuggestions. Paul[/nq]
[nq:1]One thing to consider, all of the breeds you suggested are a little hyper[/nq]
Hyper is not something I associate with either Collies or Greyhounds. I don't know enough about Whippets to comment on them. I'm assuming that the OP is talking about Rough/Smooth Collies and not Border Collies which is something else entirely. Border Collie is a cousin breed to the Rough/Smooth Collie and share a great many traits but one breed is caffinated (the BC) and the other de-caf (the Collie).
[nq:1]which means it will be harder for the dog to contain his or herself. Ihave two cats and 9 months ago brought a 10 week old Australian Shepherd puppy into the family. He and the cats are still trying to work it out.[/nq]
A typical Aussie is much more intense and active compared a typical Rough/Smooth Collie or a Greyhound. You have a nine month Aussie which is basically the Energizer Bunny in dog form. God help you. ;-)

I've had 5 smooth Collies so far and can say that, all in all, they are a mellow bunch of wimps and the roughs even more so. Their prey drive is moderate to non-existent. I foster kittens for the local SPCA and my collies have been gentle and indulgent with them, no matter how much the minute feline hellions race around and provoke them.
The Greyhounds I've known have been fairly mellow as well. There's a reason that Greyhounds are commonly called 40 MPH couch potatoes. They do like a good run but are not busy or hyper dogs otherwise. As I understand it, Greyhound adoption centers do test the dogs on cats and other pets for prey drive.
To the OP, good luck on whichever breed you choose.

Chris and her two smoothies,
Pablo and Lucy
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Laura R.:
circa Sat, 24 Apr 2004 08:45:22 -0700, in rec.pets.cats, Slapshot (Email Removed) said,
[nq:1]Some breeds I have been looking at are a Greyhound (Would adopt from the local track, something majestic about this ... up, always loved this breed) or a Collie (again past experience with this breed). But am open to other suggestions.[/nq]
In my experiences, all of these breeds do well with cats- except for one small thing. If you adopt a retired greyhound, remember that it has been bred and trained to chase that little fake rabbit, so you might want to read this:
http://rmga.org/introducing.htm
If you pick the appropriate greyhound, it can coexist well with cats. (And you definitely can introduce an adult greyhound to cats.) Keep in mind, however, that retired racers have some very specific care requirements. First, they usually have to be taught how to walk up and down stairs because they've often never seen them in their lives. Second, they must sleep on soft surfaces because their joints are fragile. Third, if you don't have access to a large, fenced-in but open area like a track or football field, then you may want to consider whether or not you should adopt a greyhound. They really need to be allowed to run daily, not just walked on a leash. A fenced-in back yard usually isn't of sufficient size for them to really run.
I've been wanting to adopt a retired racer for about fifteen years, but until I have a lifestyle that allows me to give one the kind of attention and exercise it needs, I'm going to wait. :-)

Laura

I am Dyslexia of Borg,
Your *** will be laminated.
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