My cat has sores on her nose!

This is a discussion thread · 7 replies
Frank Klein:
Hi,
Frisky, my 11 year old female indoor cat, has developed a series of small sores on her nose. They are scabbed, and have progressed from the area between her nose proper and her forehead, and are now going toward her lips. I called the vet, and after I described the problem in detail, she suggested that they are mosquito bites ("I'd put money on it," she said)... we do have a lot of mosquitoes here, but I do not think that is it. I have been watching this to see if it was getting better, but it is not... it is spreading. The spots are enlarging slowly, but more importantly, more keep appearing around the edges of the cluster. Soon her whole whisker area will be affected if I do not stop it.
The patches are little bald spots with small scabs on them. She does not appear to be in pain or itchy there; she shows no abnormal reaction when I gently pet her nose (she is not fond of being touched that close to her eyes generally, although sometimes, if she is in the mood, she likes to be gently stroked from her nose to her forehead). I have not seen her scratching at or otherwise favoring the affected area.

I took a digital photo and uploaded it to the following URL:

The spots appear more brilliant looking than they really are because of the flash, and the image is a little blurry. Unfortunately, my digital camera cannot take really close-up pictures as it has only a fixed-focus lens. I tried taking a whole series of photos at differing distances, and this one was the one that showed the problem the best. The ones that were in focus didn't show the spots much at all.
I have one other cat in the house, and he is not affected. It seems to be some sort of parasite, but I do not know where she would have picked it up. She does not have contact with any outside animals. Both cats get to go out onto the second-floor patio whenever they want (the glass door is kept open a bit to let them in and out), which they enjoy greatly, and they know better than to jump all the way down (it's too far) and they have never attempted it.

I don't see how any non-flying animals would be able to get up there from the ground; there is no fence or anything like that below which would allow an animal to get closer to the patio before attempting a jump, and the supports are made of smooth metal and cannot be climbed by any animal that uses only claws to support its weight when climbing. Birds could land on the patio, but they usually don't, certainly not with the cats there and the door open.

Ideas appreciated,
Frank
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
m. L. Briggs:
[nq:1]Hi, Frisky, my 11 year old female indoor cat, has developed a series of small sores on her nose. They ... on the patio, but they usually don't, certainly not with the cats there and the door open. Ideas appreciated, Frank[/nq]
Why not take her to the Vet much better than a phone call.! hey can take a scraping and look at it under the microscope. MLB
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
John Kimmel:
One of my cats gets the same thing on nose and ears every summer. This year it started in May, and it cleared up last month. None of the other local cats are affected.


Here's how I figured out it was mosquito bites:
http://www.vet.cornell.edu/consultant/Consult.asp?Fun=Cause 2324&spc=Feline&dxkw=&sxkw=&signs=0-A121-S861-S67

When I took the cat to the vet, they said "I don't know what it is, but we'll do a biopsy for $300. Or you can go to a cat allergist who will charge you $85 to walk in the door. $25 please." So your vet's better than mine.
[nq:1]Hi, Frisky, my 11 year old female indoor cat, has developed a series of small sores on her nose. They ... on the patio, but they usually don't, certainly not with the cats there and the door open. Ideas appreciated, Frank[/nq]
John Kimmel
girls = time x money
time = money
girls = money x money = money²
money = the root of all evil = ¬/evil
girls = (¬/evil)²
girls = evil
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
MacCandace:
>
Wow, your poor kitty looked awful in those pics. I wonder why some cats are so susceptible and others are not. It must itch like crazy. What part of the country are you from?
Candace
(take the litter out before replying by e-mail)
See my cats:

"One does not meet oneself until one catches the reflection from an eye other than human." (Loren Eisely)
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
-L.:
[nq:1]Hi, Frisky, my 11 year old female indoor cat, has developed a series of small sores on her nose.[/nq]
I would take the cat to a feline specialist. Not to freak you out, but could be skin cancer, especially if it "flares up" after exposure to the sun - during sunnier weather (most skin cancers do not resolve, so it may not be that, but I wouldn't rule it out without an exam). Nose and ears are suspect places for cancers.
best of luck,
-L.
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Frank Klein:
[nq:1]One of my cats gets the same thing on nose and ears every summer. This year it started in May, and it cleared up last month. None of the other local cats are affected.[/nq]
...
[nq:1]Here's how I figured out it was mosquito bites:[/nq]
Thanks. After I saw the images you linked, and the info from Cornell, I checked Frisky's ears, and she does have one scab on the left ear, and you can see a bald spot on the front edge of her right ear in the image I linked too. It seems to be the same thing that your cat has, but not as severe (yet). I guess the vet's phone diagnosis was correct. I sent the same letter I posted to this newsgroup to a few cat lovers I know too, and one sent me a link to a page containing this image:

http://www.fabcats.org/images/EOS4.JPEG
Not only does that look like what my cat has, it looks like my cat! It is interesting that all of the cats with this seem to be black, even though the article from Cornell says that it happens in cats of all coat colors.
The caption from the fabcats site indicates again that it is mosquito bites that are causing this. All the signs indicate mosquito bite hypersensitivity is probably Frisky's problem. So now the question is one of what to do. The vet suggested children's OFF bug repellent... how would I apply it? To her back like those flea repellents, so she can't lick it off? And is it safe to put hydrocortisone cream on her nose to help stop the histamine response and let it heal?

I will take her to the vet if necessary, but the poor little kitty is one of those skittish cats, and she gets so upset (terrified is more like it) when I take her out of the house... I prefer not to do that to her if I don't have to. But her health is my primary concern, so I will if I need to.
Thanks,
Frank
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Karen:
[nq:2]One of my cats gets the same thing on nose ... last month. None of the other local cats are affected.[/nq]
[nq:2]Here's how I figured out it was mosquito bites:[/nq]
[nq:1]Thanks. After I saw the images you linked, and the info from Cornell, I checked Frisky's ears, and she does ... I don't have to. But her health is my primary concern, so I will if I need to. Thanks, Frank[/nq]
Here is an article on that condition from Drs. Foster and Smith. Sounds like you need to keep kitty in for the most part.
http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=1&cat=1332&articleid=194

I think you should take her in to the vet to be examined and possibly for a shot.
Karen
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
John Kimmel:
Portland, OR. It looks bad, but it doesn't seem to bother him much.
[nq:1]Wow, your poor kitty looked awful in those pics. I wonder why some cats are so susceptible and others are not. It must itch like crazy. What part of the country are you from? Candace (take the litter out before replying by e-mail)[/nq]
John Kimmel
Sometimes "nothin'" is a mighty cool hand.
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.