Need help immediately or dog may lose his home

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RoxieKitty:
Hello.
A friend has a dog who she just adopted from a shelter and she need help ASAP. Her male dog (he's neutered) will not stop eliminating i the house. He will go to the bathroom outside when he is put out an on their daily walks etc., but he is still doing both of the nasties i the house. Her husband is losing his patience and is going to "get ri of" the dog if he doesn't stop.
They do crate train him when they're at work and also in the evenin hours. My friend feels bad that her dog is crated for so many hours o the day and night but she is afraid that he'll just "go" everywhere i he's not crated. This was a dog that was rescued from being tied ou 24-7 and was probably never trained as a puppy. He is around 2 year old and is part black lab part border collie. Is there any help fo this dog before he ends up on death row?
My friend doesn't have internet so that is why I am doing this fo her.
The dog is very sweet and is smart so they don't understand why this i happening.
Thanks very much

RoxieKitty
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Rocky:
[nq:1]A friend has a dog who she just adopted from a shelter and she needs help ASAP. Her male dog ... put out and on their daily walks etc., but he is still doing both of the nasties in the house.[/nq]
"Put out." Does your friend accompany him when he's outside? This is essential when house training a puppy or, in your friend's case, retraining an adult dog. (How old is he?)

Your friend must praise him, give him treats, and buy him a brand new car when he pees or poos outside - otherwise he won't know what a GREAT thing he's done. She needs to go outside no matter the weather or time of day. Short term pain..
Your friend must also take him out when she thinks that he needs to go. Eventually, she may learn to read his "I gotta go NOW!" messages, but don't count on it for the short term.
[nq:1]Her husband is losing his patience and is going to "get rid of" the dog if he doesn't stop.[/nq]
Isn't that nice.
[nq:1]They do crate train him when they're at work and also in the evening hours. My friend feels bad that ... many hours of the day and night but she is afraid that he'll just "go" everywhere if he's not crated.[/nq]
That's not crate training, that's crating. Crate training involves gradual unsupervised freedom within the house. By all means, crate him for the time being at least until y'all get a handle on a real training plan but make sure that he has some freedom in the middle of the day. He's out of the crate while his people are at home, though, with great supervision or tethering with a leash to your friend's belt.
[nq:1]This was a dog that was rescued from being tied out 24-7 and was probably never trained as a puppy.[/nq]
Good for your friend, fie on her husband. From where did she rescue the dog? Community animal services departments sometimes have good and affordable training classes where she could get face-to-face advice.
It might be a lot of work to house retrain this dog, but it's more time consuming and supervisory work than it is difficult work. Still, good luck, report back, and fill in any blanks.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
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TaraG:
[nq:1]Hello. A friend has a dog who she just adopted from a shelter and she needs help ASAP.[/nq]
In addition to the good advice that Matt gave you, check this page (and the provided links at the bottom of the page)
http://www.inch.com/~dogs/housebreaking.html
Even though the dog is not a puppy, he must be treated like a puppy who is just being introduced to housebreaking. Tell them notnotnot to correct him for having accidents. At this point, a correction would not only serve to completely confuse him, but they would be completely unfair as he clearly has no idea of what to do.
Rather than crate him excessively when they are home, I'd like to see him tethered to one of the owners (preferably your friend and not her husband, but I'm biased by a few of the comments you say he's made). Tethering is basically just putting him on a leash and then connecting the leash to a belt or tying it around one's waist so the dog is always* with you..even during those moments when he might otherwise slip away. It also forces the owners to observe his behavior differently. I find most people learn their dog's body language (especially as it relates to housebreaking) MUCH faster when they're tethered to their dog. Because the *owner learns much faster, then (not coincidentally) so does the dog.
Tara
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Alison:
[nq:1]Hello. A friend has a dog who she just adopted from a shelter and she needs help ASAP. Her male ... her. The dog is very sweet and is smart so they don't understand why this is happening. Thanks very much.>>[/nq]
How long has your friend had the dog for? You can certainly retrain a dog to be clean indoors , you just need the right advice (which has already been given )
and some patience. It's a good start that the dog is going outside and she can build up from there ( some dogs become inhibited and hold it until they get back inside)
I would emphasise to your friend not to let her husband tell the dog off or become cross with it even if he catches the dog in the act as this will put the dog off from going to the toilet in front of him regardless of where they are.
Can they arrange for the dog to be walked in the day? Its a long time not to have toilet access whether he is in a crate or not and it will help with the training.
When it comes to behaviour and training problems , it's usually the owners who aren't smart.
Alison
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RoxieKitty:
[nq:1]Hello. A friend has a dog who she just adopted from a shelter and she need help ASAP. Her male ... her. The dog is very sweet and is smart so they don't understand why this i happening. Thanks very much.[/nq]
Thank you to all who is trying to help this dog. I'm not too sure tha they are willing to do the work (and NO, I cannot call her a friend i she "gets rid of" the dog) She says she wants a dog that she ca "trust" and not have to follow it around all the time. She doesn' have the energy, so she says. I am very upset about this and it ma very well wreck our friendship.
I will print it out and give her the info. I think she should "get ri of" her husband instead

RoxieKitty
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Alison:
[nq:1]Thank you to all who is trying to help this dog. I'm not too sure that they are willing to ... will print it out and give her the info. I think she should "get rid of" her husband instead!>>> RoxieKitty>>[/nq]
I hope it helps and good on you for trying to help too. My first thought when reading your post was get rid of the husband. I hope they never have children!
This is a sad situation because they knew what they were taking on and now can't be bothered. The only thing you can do is to encourage her to give it a try for a few days at least . He might catch on quick and she won't have to do it for long. It's not that hard, She can keep the dog tethered to her or in the same room.
Once the dog has the right idea , she will be able to trust him. Alison
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Paula:
[nq:1]Thank you to all who is trying to help this dog. I'm not too sure that they are willing to ... I will print it out and give her the info. I think she should "get rid of" her husband instead![/nq]
You don't get a dog you can trust without putting in the work, but if she does tether it to her for a few days, prevent accidents indoors and praise to high heavens when the dog goes outdoors, she will have years of a dog that she can trust. It's not that big a deal when you look at it that way. Dogs certainly get it a lot faster than kids learn not to have accidents when they are potty training, but you don't expect kids to just know how to do it and always get it right without having to spend some time teaching it to them. You just can't expect the dog to know what you want it to do, or where you want it to go, in this case, without teaching it that. They don't read minds.

Paula
"Anyway, other people are weird, but sometimes they have candy, so it's best to try to get along with them." Joe Bay
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