New puppy pees whenever I leave him

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Spengie:
I'm posting this message in hopes that someone can give me advice as to what we need to do in order to help our new puppy adjust to living in our home.
My husband and I just brought home two new puppies - a male Shitzu (named Mac) and a female Lhasa Alpsa (named Lacey) - both around 12 weeks old. They are both incredibly cute and play very well together.

We are crate training them and are very methodical as to take them out to go potty whenever we let them out of the crate and after eating their meals. We also take them out when we hear them begin to cry to see if they are crying because they need to alleviate themselves. They are put back in the crate when ample time has been given for them to produce something or not. We give them more than enough opportunity to 'do their business'.
They are housed in our 'open' (essentially no doors) tiled bathroom. We bought a low room divider that is placed between the bedroom and the bathroom - it has holes so we can all see each other. Their crate is just inside this bathroom. The problem is whenever I or my husband leave, he proceeds to cry and pees. This happens after he has just done his 'business' (both poop and pee) as we do not let him free roam in the confined area when they have not gone potty - otherwise they are in the crate. It's not like we leave him and he can't see us. He can see us through the divider and he cries\pees. Does he feel like we will not come back? A sort of separation anxiety pee?
When we leave them in their crate for a few hours (1-3 hours), the towel in their crate appears to be okay - however I am switching to a white colored towel as I was using a yellow one which makes identifying accidents very difficult. Their water bottle leaks so I don't know when the towel is damp, if it's from water or pee.
I am just curious if this is something normal... and if Mac will grow out of it. If not for these ocassional accidents everything would be great. He pees and poops successfully when asked to 'do his business'.

Please please help me. I just need someone to say, it's normal and/or it happened to them and this is how to remedy the situation.

Thanks for any advice!
P.S. What should I do if I see that the towel in the crate is wet from pee even if Mac pee-ed before being placed there. What do I do if he's exhibiting the same behavior when he cries and pees in the crate and outside of the crate as well??
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Jessica Benko:
I would remove any absorbent material from the crate altogether. He will do that as long as he doesn't have to wear it, if you know what I mean.

Also, what exactly are you doing to let him know this is not ok? The most successful way to housetrain a puppy is to catch them in the act. When you catch him going in the house, you immediately scoop him up and use a key phrase such as NO or whatever you choose, but in a firm and disapproving tone of voice. Then soak up the pee with paper towels and take both the dog and the towel out to where you want him to go, place the towel down and put the dog down by it making sure he sniffs the towel. This gives him the idea that it stays there and only there. Do this with the poop also.

And while in the house, try keeping him attached to you on a leash. This also helps him understand you are the leader and can help make training easier. This also makes it much easier for you to catch him in the act.

These puppy phases don't last long, so timing is everything at this age. By doing this, I housetrained my older female in 2 weeks, and I got her at 6 weeks. I call her the miracle dog as I have never in my life seen such a young puppy get it so quickly. LOL My younger girl was 8 weeks when we got her and she got it down by about 14 weeks. Patience and persistence pays off.
~J
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Leah:
[nq:1]Also, what exactly are you doing to let him know this is not ok? The most successful way to housetrain ... use a key phrase such as NO or whatever you choose, but in a firm and disapproving tone of voice.[/nq]
No no no, I disagree vehemently! You do NOT want to let him know you are upset. Dogs don't generalize well. He will not understand "You don't want me to go HERE." He will think, "You don't want me to GO."

I've seen too many dogs trained to sneak into other rooms or behind furniture this way, or to refuse to eliminate in front of the owner outside.

Family Dog Trainer
"It's A Dog's Life"
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Get Healthy, Build Your Immune System, Lose Weight http://www.re-vita.net/dfrntdrums
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Rocky:
[nq:2]When you catch him going in the house, you immediately ... choose, but in a firm and disapproving tone of voice.[/nq]
[nq:1]No no no, I disagree vehemently! You do NOT want to let him know you are upset.[/nq]
Jessica wrote "firm and disapproving", not upset.
[nq:1]Dogs don't generalize well.[/nq]
No, but they associate well. I see absolutely nothing wrong (dog-wise) with carrying him out while in midstream. I give an abusively neutral "uh-uh" when I catch a dog doing this.
[nq:1]He will not understand "You don't want me to go HERE." He will think, "You don't want me to GO."[/nq]
Nope. Not if you "catch them in the act" as Jessica wrote.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
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Jessica Benko:
No no no, I disagree vehemently! You do NOT want to let him know you are upset. >>>
You don't freak out, if that's what you're thinking. Definitely not. But if you simply say "no" or whatever key word you want to use, in a firm (not loud and scary) voice, and IMMEDIATELY take him to where you want him to go, and praise him highly when he goes there, he WILL quickly get the hint that he cannot go THERE but he CAN go HERE.
~J
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Leah:
[nq:1]You don't freak out, if that's what you're thinking. Definitely not. But if you simply say "no" or whatever key ... when he goes there, he WILL quickly get the hint that he cannot go THERE but he CAN go HERE.[/nq]
Some dogs will. Others will respond just as I described. Oops, she doesn't want me to pee. Have to hide to do it.

Family Dog Trainer
"It's A Dog's Life"
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Get Healthy, Build Your Immune System, Lose Weight http://www.re-vita.net/dfrntdrums
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Alison:
[nq:2]Also, what exactly are you doing to let him know ... choose, but in a firm anddisapproving tone of voice. >>.[/nq]
The most successful way to house train a puppy is to make sure he's not in a position *to* be caught in the act in the first place. Alison
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Alison:
[nq:1]Jessica wrote "firm and disapproving", not upset.>>[/nq]
That's even worse. You don't want the pup or dog to associate any disapproval with weeing or pooing.
[nq:1]No, but they associate well. I see absolutely nothing wrong (dog-wise) with carrying him out while in midstream. I give an abusively neutral "uh-uh" when I catch a dog doing this.>>>[/nq]
I understand the theory but I think that when it comes to toileting and house training, dogs can be highly sensitive and it doesn't take much for things to go wrong. Once it goes wrong , it can be a heck of a job to put the dog back on course.
If you adopt a dog that has housetraining problems, giving any sort of correction when it has an accident inside is one of the worse things you can do.
Alison:)
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Alison:
[nq:1]No no no, I disagree vehemently! You do NOT want to let him knowyou are upset. >>> You don't freak ... highly when he goes there, he WILL quickly get thehint that he cannot go THERE but he CAN go HERE.>>[/nq]
But firm can be loud and scary to a pup. (You also said disapproving in the other post.) By the time you have put him in the place where you want him to go , I should think the pup would have finished weeing so he won't make the connection and be confused. Once he's confused he's going to become uncertain about the whole thing and he'll sneak away to wee or won't perform while you are watching. Alison
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