Puppy Growling and Attacking me when he has a bone

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Simon Adebisi:
Hi,
When I give my puppy a pigs ear growls at me from across the room when I approach him he attacks me. He is very fun and placid with everyone, other dogs, children and all people. Today he bit me really badly and ripped my skin. He is 14 weeks old Old English Mastiff. He had a bad start in life as
10 of the 13 pups died and he had to be hand fed an live away from hismother. I was told I got him at 8 weeks but when checking the date of birth on the KC form I received nearly a month later it seems he was only 5 weeks old.
I have him created and am cage training him.
He sleeps in the cage and enjoys the cage.
I eat first then him.
I am feeing his dry food from hand.
He will sit and wait for the command to eat before he eats. He will also not touch the pigs ear or his food if I give the command not to touch.
He will let me play with him with the pigs ear just after I have given it him but if I leave him with it after a 60 seconds he goes into mental protective dog mode.
I never look at him when he is eating his food after I give it him.

Any suggestions what to do? As he is an Old English Mastiff he will be a bog lad when he get to full size (his dad was 18 stone and not an ounce of fat on him)
Thanks in advance
Simon
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Anonymous:
[nq:1]When I give my puppy a pigs ear growls at me from across the room when I approach him he ... of birth on the KC form I received nearly a month later it seems he was only 5 weeks old.[/nq]
Please do not rely on internet advice. See an experienced trainer ASAP. You can easily make this worse. On this page
http://www.dog-play.com/behavior.html I have some references to some qualified trainer resources in the UK

Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com /
http://dogplay.com/Shop/dogplayshop.htm
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Bernie:
Seeking out a good and qualified trainer would be a good idea, but until then, just don't give the pup any more pigs ears. I've seen many mild mannered dogs become nasty and defend these treats or other leather chews.

Also, start right now with the "no free lunch" program. When feeding the dog, make him sit and stay, and wait until verbally released before he is allowed to eat from his bowl. Not too long, about 15 seconds the first time, then keep increasing bit by bit. If he doesn't listen and goes for the food, pick it up (you should still have your hand on the bowl when first doing this), then have him step back, sit, stay, and try again. Work on reducing any food defense attitude before it gets worse. Good Luck.
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Anonymous:
[nq:1]Hi, When I give my puppy a pigs ear growls at me from across the room when I approach him ... to full size (his dad was 18 stone and not an ounce of fat on him) Thanks in advance Simon[/nq]I am not a vet but ...it sounds like your dog may have a case of canine possessive aggression disorder which can be treat via training. When I worked on changing this behavior was I wore leather gloves and jacket during the training exercise to prevent from getting hurt (by the dog) - it also helped that the dog was less than a year old so its teeth were not that big. Having the leash and a another trainer is also very helpful in working out this behaviour.

With the leash still on the dog, give the dog its favorite toy, then asked to dog to "drop" its favorite toy so you could take it. If the dog drops the toy, you should praise the dog for dropping the toy on command. If the dog resist and does not let go of the toy from its mouth - pry open its mouth to take to toy away without giving praise. If the dog tries bits, the dog will have to drop the toy, you can must quickly take the toy away. If the leash is on, have another person use the collar/harness to restrain the dog if it tries to attack.

If a leash is not available or you are for some reason unable to prevent the dog from attacking/biting/snapping at
you, you should say "ouch" if the dog actually
bits or snaps at you to show it has hurt you. If the dog attacks you push the dog's head temporarily to the ground in a submission position while sternly and loudly saying "NO" to indicate that attacking a human to
protect the toy was an unacceptable behavior. After this let go of the dog slowly ( if the dog attempted to attack again you have to force the dog's head back down
into a submission position until the dog gives up the attack). After a minute or so, give the toy
back to the dog to play with (to show the dog that its fav toy was not lost but was only borrowed
temporarily). After the dog plays with its favorite toy for a while, repeated the exercise to see if the dog would give up its favorite toy when requested - if the dog doesnot drop the favorite toy - repeat
the exercise. The goal of this exercise is to (1)
create trust between you and the dog that objects dropped by the dog are not always lost forever, (2) communicating to the dog that biting a human to protect an object is wrong and unnecessary, and (3) teaching the dog the command "drop". By providing multiple toy and fun objects for the dog - this exercise can be repeated with different objects to insure that the dog understands the action to drop an object is not dependent on the object itself but on the command "drop." I'm not sure the above will work for you but it worked out for me.
Good Luck with your puppy. HTH
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FurPaw:
[nq:1]Seeking out a good and qualified trainer would be a good idea, but until then, just don't give the pup any more pigs ears. I've seen many mild mannered dogs become nasty and defend these treats or other leather chews.[/nq]
I second this - no more pig ears until training happens. Dylan showed similar behavior with pig ears when she was an adolescent (when we first gave them to her), so we stopped giving them to her. She was fine with all other treats. We re-introduced them when she was four or five, and had no problems going forward. We didn't specifically train her not to be aggressive with treats during that time, just gave her general obedience training. I attribute most of the change to maturation.
FurPaw
[nq:1]Also, start right now with the "no free lunch" program. When feeding the dog, make him sit and stay, and ... step back, sit, stay, and try again. Work on reducing any food defense attitude before it gets worse. Good Luck.[/nq]
"Don't believe everything that you think."
- Seen on a bumper sticker
To reply, unleash the dog
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si:
We have a bull mastiff, staffy and bordeaux cross called Holly.

I can take food or chews right out of her mouth, no problem at all, not even a murmer.
She has never, ever growled at me or displayed any aggressive behaviour. I think thats because she knows her paws wouldn't even touch the floor if she did. Nothing wrong with physically repremanding your dogs, as long as you do not go overboard.
Happens in the wild and they understand it. Arguing with the pack leader will result in a slap across the back thigh (at least I'm not biting here).
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