Urinary crystals - How long to recover?

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Rachael:
My cat was having some peeing problems last night so I took him to the emergency vet. They said that he was blocked and catheterized him. The urine sample showed that he had urinary crystals. They kept him overnight and I got him back tonight.
They sedated him so that they could examine him shortly before I picked him up, so he has been stumbling about and pretty lethargic since he got home. He has been in the litterbox several times and seems to only be getting out a few drops at a time (a slight improvement over last night where he was getting nothing out.

The vet gave him an antibiotic injection and gave me some liquid antibiotics to start giving him tomorrow. She gave me some prescription food and told me to change his diet to it for at least 3 months.
I'm still pretty worried about him and was wondering how quickly cats usually recover from this. Should I be worried that he's only getting out a few drops of urine at a time? He hasn't eaten or drunk anything since he's been home, but I think that is partially due to the sedation.
I'd appreciate any advice from people who have been through this before.
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Dave:
If he's getting out only a few drops at a time, it's a very serious situation. Hope you've called the vet by now or have taken him back to the emergency clinic.
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Karen:
[nq:1]My cat was having some peeing problems last night so I took him to the emergency vet. They said that ... think that is partially due to the sedation. I'd appreciate any advice from people who have been through this before.[/nq]
After the catheterization, he may have muscle spasms for a while which is why the frequent trips to the box. When this happened with Grant, I did take him back and they gave him a shot of torbutol for the spasming. It did work but really zoned him out. Put as much water around as you can. Have they suggested a change of diet? Wet food is better than dry, so if you can switch him over that would be better. It may take a little while. Keep an eye on him.
Karen
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Philip ®:
[nq:1]After the catheterization, he may have muscle spasms for a while which is why the frequent trips to the box. ... can switch him over that would be better. It may take a little while. Keep an eye on him. Karen[/nq]
What connection is there between wet vs. dry food and an occluded urethra?

~~Philip
"Never let school interfere
with your education - Mark Twain"
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Phil P.:
[nq:1]What connection is there between wet vs. dry food and an occluded urethra?[/nq]
Cats fed dry food drink more water than cats fed canned food but most of that water is lost to fecal moisture so that urine volume is lower and urine specific gravity higher in cats fed dry food. The urine concentration of all solutes, including potentially calculogenic crystalloids, depends on urine volume. The lower the urine volume the higher the concentration of solutes and the greater the risk of clumping together into larger and larger particles that eventually become crystals or uroliths that can block the urethra.
Male cats have an anatomic peculiarity which makes them more susceptible to obstructions of the urethra than females. In male cats, the urethra narrows, almost like a funnel, where it passes over the pelvis into the penis so small crystals can lodge and easily plug the urethra. Even though females can contain the same substances in their urine, they have a large, somewhat strait urethra that makes plugging unlikely.
Phil
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Phil P.:
[nq:1]My cat was having some peeing problems last night so I took him to the emergency vet. They said that ... getting out a few drops at a time (a slight improvement over last night where he was getting nothing out.[/nq]
Take your cat back to the vet immediately. Complete or partial obstruction of the urinary tract can produces a pathophysiologic state equivalent to oliguric acute renal failure!
Phil
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Rachael:
[nq:1]After the catheterization, he may have muscle spasms for a while which is why the frequent trips to the box. ... can switch him over that would be better. It may take a little while. Keep an eye on him. Karen[/nq]
My cat is a little better today. He has had a couple of large puddles today along with numerous little ones. He seems to be peeing wherever the urge hits him though which I'm hoping he'll stop doing. I put him, his litterbox & his food in a room with a tile floor to try to make him use the box instead of the chair, carpet, wall, etc.

I don't think he's still blocked because he's getting out plenty of pee. I'm going to call the vet tomorrow to see what she says about it.
She suggested changing his diet to Hill's Prescription diet C/D-S for
3 months and then talk to her about some kind of maintenance food.She gave me some wet food for him, but said if he wouldn't eat it, dry was fine. He won't even go near the wet food, so I ordered some dry & he's eating his regular food until that comes.
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Diane L. Schirf:
[nq:1]She suggested changing his diet to Hill's Prescription diet C/D-S for 3 months[/nq]
This worked wonders for Hodge.

http://www.mindspring.com/~slywy /
http://slywy.diaryland.com /
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Rachael:
[nq:1]Take your cat back to the vet immediately. Complete or partial obstruction of the urinary tract can produces a pathophysiologic state equivalent to oliguric acute renal failure! Phil[/nq]
He's back in the hospital as of about 2 hours ago. They catheterized him again and are keeping him in the hospital to be monitored for a few days.
Do cats usually recover from this? They're not very forthcoming with the information at this vet hospital.
-Rachael
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