Why does my lab step on my feet?

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barooo:
All,
I have a 6 1/2 month old female yellow labrador retriever (spayed), living indoors, who has a WONDERFUL temperament. For a 6 month old lab, she's amazingly calm, and has responded to training quite well. She doesn't seem to try pulling the dominance games some labs like, and seems to have accepted her place in the pack behind me, the gf, and the cat. Aside from jumping on people when she gets excited, she's pretty much great behavrioraly.
I have one question though... When she walks by us or come up to us many times she will step on our feet. It's worst when we're sitting down and she comes up to us. Is this intentional? I find it hard to believe that she doesn't realize where she's stepping. What does this mean? Of course, as I type this she's laying on my feet chewing a pressed rawhide bone Emotion: smile
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Chris HIll:
Hello:
Over or on usually means the puppy is subtlety going for top dog. Gently remove your body part from under her. JM2CW
Chris
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Rocky:
[nq:1]When she walks by us or come up to us many times she will step on our feet. It's worst when we're sitting down and she comes up to us. Is this intentional?[/nq]
She's still growing into her body and might not know where her feet are. My 5.5 year old Aussie still does this. Keep her nails trimmed for those times you're not wearing shoes.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
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Suja:
[nq:1]She's still growing into her body and might not know where her feet are. My 5.5 year old Aussie still does this. Keep her nails trimmed for those times you're not wearing shoes.[/nq]
I had the opposite problem. I am just so not used to having a dog underfoot that I kept stepping on Sebastian's feet while he was here. This was especially bad when I wore my winter shoes that are larger than my regular shoes. I felt bad for the poor guy - he has foot pad problems due to his lupus, and on top of it, stoopid, uncoordinated hoomin with two left feet kept stepping on his tender feeties.

Suja
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Bre:
I have two labs, and my male does this. He is a spaz for sure. I don't think he knows where his feet are some days. I just say "ouch" and he moves. He was three yesterday and fortunately he does not do it as much as he used to.
Bre
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Rosa Palmén:
[nq:1]All, I have a 6 1/2 month old female yellow labrador retriever (spayed), living indoors, who has a WONDERFUL temperament. ... does this mean? Of course, as I type this she's laying on my feet chewing a pressed rawhide bone Emotion: smile[/nq]My younger dog does it more frequently than my older dog, but he is also more often very close to me. I don't mind much, if it hurts I tell him to watch where he's putting his feet. They both like sitting on peoples feet, I am not sure if it is just because they want to be close to them, or if it is also to keep the person in that spot. They usually do this to people they like very much and are happy to see.

They don't do it much to me anymore because I always ask them to move (except in winter when a warm butt is nice on your frozen feet =) ). My youngster will sometimes step on me when I call him to me and he comes running. I have not tried to correct him at those times, because I think that coming when called should always be fun for him.

If it is a dominance related behaviour or not I don't know, and I don't care much either. People and dogs have to learn a lot of signals, and what they mean, from each other, and a lot of misunderstandings happen. If I don't react the way I should to this behaviour, it will not be the first or last time I make my dogs confused =). The balance in our relationship is still maintained by many, many other small things that we both seem to understand the meaning of.
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montana:
[nq:1]If it is a dominance related behaviour or not I don't know, and I don't care much either.[/nq]
I don't know whether it's dominance-related, either. Our old Lab mix steps on my feet more often than any of the other dogs, but he's a great big 'ole mama's boy. I usually say "ow" or "hey" or something & they realize they're on my feet & move. I step on their feet by accident, too. If they were pushy about it, I'd probably do more about it. "Get off of my feet!" is probably the most "harsh" command I give them.
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Rocky:
[nq:1]"Get off of my feet!" is probably the most "harsh" command I give them.[/nq]
Heh. "Ouch" is probably the harshest thing I say to Rocky. OK, maybe a "Dammit" now and then.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
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Paula:
[nq:1]I have two labs, and my male does this. He is a spaz for sure. I don't think he knows ... and he moves. He was three yesterday and fortunately he does not do it as much as he used to.[/nq]My lab mix never looks at the ground unless she saw food drop onto it. She is always looking at everyone's face or at what is going on in the big blue yonder. She doesn't step on my feet any more than other dogs her age have in the past that I've noticed, but I wouldn't be surprised if the more people/face focused dogs are more apt to trip up on feet. I mean, she can't look both places at once, right? Feet just aren't the most important thing to look at! To the OP: I wouldn't' assume it was intentional or a dominance play, but would clue the dog in when he is on your feet so he gets the message to be aware of it because you don't like it.

If it doesn't diminish from there or escalates, then you can worry about what it "means" but for right now, it might not "mean" anything more than that the dog is not aware enough of the location and tenderness of feet.

Paula
"Duwayne, you're living proof that when a man who has no idea what he's doing redoubles his efforts, there's no end to what you can't do." Scott Marquardt
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