Hi all,
Jake, my 5 month old Border Collie is a pleasure to own - except he is still (possibly play) biting. He is a loving and obedient dog much of the time but still does the following:
a) nips our legs at times as if to encourage play but does not respond to "no" at any time - I know this is a BC trait but it can be painful!

b) play biting when excited including snapping, it's not an agressive look or bite just something he does - but again "no" is not working nor time out
c) just as I thought I was doing well, he's starting to play up now if he doesn't want to do something - at the end of any walk he senses the end is near, lies down and gives a quick bite or two if I try to pick him up. He absolutley won't move so I have to pick him up but he doesn't make it easy and I can't drag him! He also "refuses" to go outside unless he sees fit - so the outside command is often met with him having what can only be described as a bit of a tantrum really and of course, a bite.
People have told me to "down him" - get him by the scruff of the neck and hold him down and say no - it doesn't work (though I have only done it a few times - it makes him worse) and to be honest I am not at all comfortable doing it, even though it doesn't hurt him, I find it a bit too agressive. Am I too soft?
I'm with him all day and most of the time he is good as gold but I'd be really grateful for advice or shared experiences on the biting problem.
Cheers
Lynda
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Hi!
I think you´re dealing with an alfa leader. Try "amichien bonding". Maybe if you act as a leader he stops this.
"Lynda" (Email Removed) escreveu na mensagem
Hi all, Jake, my 5 month old Border Collie is a pleasure to own - except he is still (possibly ... is good as gold but I'd be really grateful for advice or shared experiences on the biting problem. Cheers Lynda

Lynda, my Aussie is a year now and still doing the play bite thing. I put another toy in his mouth and when he isn't biting I tell him what a good boy he is. Heck, I'm trying, but I'm dealing with an alpha male like you are. Border Collie, Aussie, same thing. GREAT dogs, so smart, but tough if they think they have the upper hand.
I wish I had advice, but I've already got my hands full. ;~)

BTW, my dog CHARGED into the ocean yesterday after tennis balls and swam in a clean, clear fresh stream afterwards. How nice to have a tired, happy dog. smile
kili
Hi all, Jake, my 5 month old Border Collie is a pleasure to own - except he is still (possibly play) biting. He is a loving and obedient dog much of the time but still does the following:

He's still very much a puppy - please don't even consider the idea of 'alpha male' - he probably hasn't even got his bits through yet!

Its normal for a puppy - some are easier than others - mine was a nightmare (and still is with other people who purposefully try and invite bitey games, she's 11 months). He should be just about done teething, but may still be a bit itchy around the teeth, so allow a little for that.

otherwise, two things may work well - the 'ouch' works pretty well with many dogs and did with a bc I babysat before my pup came along - that is, when your pup nip, squeal 'ouch' in the most hurt voice you have, turn away and sulk. He should then understand that he's hurt you and must be more gentle if he wants to be with you. This worked just fine at first with my dog at 7 weeks old but by the time she was 4 months, she decided it was fun to make me make the noise, but she is a hunting dog.
If this doesn't work with your dog, scrap the high pitch ouch and substitute for a firm (but not shouty or angry) 'leave' / or 'no', and walk out of the room and leave him standing there or if that's impossible, fold your arms and turn your back on him (works well for jumping up too). This worked with us, though I will say I did cheat and re-enforced the 'leave' command with a squirt from a water pistol - she knows the warning and tone that tells her when enough is enough, so I don't regret it at all but I use the actual water pistol very sparingly for absolute emergencies.

Biting and learning bite inhibition is vital for dogs - its well explained in books by Dr. Ian Dunbar - I suggest you check out your local library for some of his books.
good luck and don't worry, he's a baby and like all babies, he has to learn. The more he does, the more you can teach him.
Diana
Thanks for that Diana. I have not tried the folding arms/turning my back. I will also check out the library for the author you mentioned.

You are right by the way - he's not got his bits yet Emotion: smile

Lynda
Thanks for that Diana. I have not tried folding my arms and turning my back so will give that a go. I will also check out the library for books by the author you mentioned.
And you are right - he's not got his bits yet Emotion: smile
Hiya,
Nice to know I'm not alone!
I've don't live near the ocean (how I wish I did) but have just had a good old playing session with Jake whilst hosing my garden - so now I've got a soggy dog who's hopefully too tired to bite for a bit:)

Lynda
Hi all, Jake, my 5 month old Border Collie is a pleasure to own - except he is still (possibly ... is good as gold but I'd be really grateful for advice or shared experiences on the biting problem. Cheers Lynda

Lynda
Mental stimulation is making him think - make him work for everything - his food, his treats, his toys etc.
an example very quickly (I'll send a more detailed reply when I've got a bit more time) get a couple of plastic cups and with either a treat or toy let him see you put one under one of the cups and ask him to find. Once he gets the hang of that make it more difficult and ask him to find. There will be more and more you can do but try this for starters.

Speak soon
Yvonne
Thanks Yvonne, I'll look forward to hearing from you again.

I have learnt a lot in only a few days and can now see the mental stimulation is important. I gave Jake one of those toys today where the treats fall out when it's rolled over - he didn't really get it a few months back but today he understood what it was all about and has spent ages with it (not too many treats in there mind). It was a pleasure to watch Emotion: smile
Bye for now,
Lynda
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