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I feel that it would be irresponsible and selfish if you acquired a pet bird under these circumstances. (your long work hours) perhaps you should buy some goldfish if you're looking for something "pretty" to decorate your house with.
Hello, What are the effects of a parrot being in ... know the effects on CAGS and Amazons and Mcaws. Gary.

I feel that it would be irresponsible and selfish if you acquired a pet bird under these circumstances. (your long work hours) perhaps you should buy some goldfish if you're looking for something "pretty" to decorate your house with.

There may be certain birds that are suitable (budgies are usually fine if you have two in a cage with lots of toys, as are finches) but certainly not a CAG, an Amazon or a macaw - they don't do well when caged for long periods and they'll go stir crazy and start feather-plucking. There is evidence that African greys may be second only to man on this planet in terms of intelligence. They're not just a pet you can leave alone - you almost have to think of them as your own child (one that'll outlive you).
I feel that it would be irresponsible and selfish if ... you're looking for something "pretty" to decorate your house with.

There may be certain birds that are suitable (budgies are usually fine if you have two in a cage with ... you can leave alone - you almost have to think of them as your own child (one that'll outlive you).

I find the idea of any healthy animal in a cage distasteful. I wouldn't want a trophy wife either.
Jerry

Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get. ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
There may be certain birds that are suitable (budgies are ... of them as your own child (one that'll outlive you).

I find the idea of any healthy animal in a cage distasteful. I wouldn't want a trophy wife either.

Can I have her? Emotion: smile
I find the idea of any healthy animal in a cage distasteful. I wouldn't want a trophy wife either.

Can I have her? Emotion: smile

Now Phil, that's a Howard remark. You've been hanging around too long ;-)

Can I have her? Emotion: smile

Now Phil, that's a Howard remark. You've been hanging around too long ;-)

Does he have an attractive wife?
certainly not a CAG, an Amazon or a macaw - they don't do well when caged for long periods and ... feather-plucking. There is evidence that African greys may be second only to man on this planet in terms of intelligence.

I was looking at birds at a pet shop (just LOOKING).. and watching their behavior.
They had a bird there that talked and whistled, but the poor thing had a completely bald chest! My husband just said, "that poor thing has issues"! S/he was caged and alone in the cage... perhaps this is the problem for/with this bird??? Too much time in the cage? Can/should they be reported? Just wondering..
Thanks,
J.
certainly not a CAG, an Amazon or a macaw - ... only to man on this planet in terms of intelligence.

I was looking at birds at a pet shop (just LOOKING).. and watching their behavior. They had a bird there ... this is the problem for/with this bird??? Too much time in the cage? Can/should they be reported? Just wondering.. Thanks,

It's not against the law for a bird to pluck its own feathers. You could "rescue" the bird from it's terrible conditons by buying it. I get the impression some stores allow/encourage plucking as a sales gimmick.
My wife bought a young CAG about 14 years ago. The bird was kept a large cage for about eight years and had plucked itself bare on the chest. My wife became ill and I took over the care of her birds about six years ago. I put a T stand next to the desk by my computer so I'm near her for typically 3 hours a day. I also let her sleep on my bed's footboard while I sleep. (the bird, not the wife). Anyway, she stopped plucking as soon as she was no longer caged and the feathers grew back completly within a year.

The only thing which saddens me is that she's never learned to fly. (the bird, not the wife) She can flap to the ground safely but makes no attempt to ever fly on her own. The other six birds in my house are no longer caged either and all are flight worthy. The only feather plucking problem is that the mated B&G's overgroom each other making their feathers ratty looking.
The only thing which saddens me is that she's
never learned to fly. (the bird, not the wife) She can flap to the ground safely but makes no attempt to ever fly on her own.

That's interesting I've had my African Grey 27 years and she has never attempted to fly, either. She holds tight to the chair back/perch, whatever and "flaps" like crazy, but has never let go to attempt lift off. She, too, flys down just fine, and makes a controlled, safe landing.

XXgizzieXX
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