Hello,
What are the effects of a parrot being in isolation from 8am to 6pm, 7 days a week? Trying to learn as much about these birds before any potential purchase. Are two birds better than one when they are left alone for a work shift every day?
Would like to know the effects on CAGS and Amazons and Mcaws.

Gary.
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Hello, What are the effects of a parrot being in isolation from 8am to 6pm, 7 days a week? Trying ... left alone for a work shift every day? Would like to know the effects on CAGS and Amazons and Mcaws.

Depends on the individual bird. Effects can range from nothing at all to severe depression, feather plucking etc. Make sure they have lots of toys (rotate them every few weeks). Another good rule is, don't give a new bird more attention than you'll give him on a continual basis. Whatever level of attention (and companionship) you give them at first, they'll come to demand that same level every day.
As for pairs as opposed to singles, bonded pairs are a great idea for most bird species.
Hello, What are the effects of a parrot being in isolation from 8am to 6pm, 7 days a week? Trying ... alone for a work shift every day? Would like to know the effects on CAGS and Amazons and Mcaws. Gary.

Most parrots would be fine, as long as they got 3 or more hours out of cage time. The bigger the bird the more time outside the cage they need, because the largest parrots (ie the large macaws), don't really have big enough cages.
Get the largest cage you can afford (say, a macaw-sized cage for a CAG), fill it with LOTS of toys. Doesn't have to be anything expensive, a couple treats in a paper lunch bag, leafy branches, etc. Maybe get a clock radio and set it so that the radio goes off at various times in the day.
Keep in mind that if YOU don't get a break (try to get one day off a week, at least!) you will feel too tired to want to interact with your bird. For couple months I was working two jobs, and had to quit one as I was neglecting my birds. (not seriously, but they were being allowed to run loose in the bird room for days on end) If you are thinking about getting a bird I would reccomend getting used to your work schedual FIRST.

Keep in mind that the larger the bird the more work. It could be that a nice handfed cockatiel might be a better fit then a large parrot. They are tame, sweet, easy to keep entertained, not as loud as the big guys, and a large cage is fairly small in comparison to what a macaw needs.
Gloria
Gary,
I recently made the decision to move my Green Cheek Conure upstairs into my study during the day (my wife is at home during the day with our kids downstairs and the kids wouldn't leave the bird alone). As part of this I decided to get a friend for my GCC and ended up with a Sun Conure. It's been about a month and a half since I did this and it's worked out quite well so far.
I keep them in seperate cages (important if you don't want the two birds to bond to each other). From the best I can tell, they do entertain each other some during the day, but mostly they play to themselfs. They do seem to now perceive each other as being part of the same flock, they call to each other when one is taken out of the study or when one is out of site of the other. I think having two birds is a good idea, just keep them in seperate cages.
Gary, I recently made the decision to move my Green Cheek Conure upstairs into my study during the day (my ... of site of the other. I think having two birds is a good idea, just keep them in seperate cages.

Our birds do this a lot. The Macaw and Conure DO NOT like each other at all. If they are both with us on the couch you have to watch them as both of them will try to bite the other, BUT. When I come home in the morning from work and have to lock up the Macaw so I can get some sleep I often hear them doing a LOT of vocalization with each other. At times It gets very entertaining listening to them, and they are obviously enjoying it.
You never really learn to swear until you learn to drive.
Gary, I recently made the decision to move my Green ... is a good idea, just keep them in seperate cages.

Our birds do this a lot. The Macaw and Conure DO NOT like each other at all. If they are ... of vocalization with each other. At times It gets very entertaining listening to them, and they are obviously enjoying it.

My Macaws are actually a LOT quieter than the conures. And have a nicer squawk anyway!

The only things my Macaws say to the conures are "shut up!", "JASPER!!", and "that's enough!"

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During one "generation gap" quarrel with his parents young Michael cried, "I want excitement, adventure, money, and beautiful women. I'll never find it here at home, so I'm leaving. Don't try and stop me!" With that he headed toward the door. His father rose and followed close behind. "Didn't you hear what I said? I don't want you to try and stop me." "Who's trying to stop you?" replied his father. "If you wait a minute, I'll go with you."
I suppose my view is more extreme than most of the replies you got.

The birds you mention are so smart and sensitive.
Getting a bird that smart and just leaving it in a cage from 8-6 is cruel. You wouldn't leave a baby alone in a playpen for that many hours, don't do it with a smart bird.
Creatures like that need stimulation (granted some of which can come from toys) and INTERACTION, which no toys can adequately give.

The point about you being too tired to give them attention after work was good too. Plus you'll need time to clean up the "night deposits" and such every morning before work. And the birds will want some attention before work. Half an hour on your shoulder or eating breakfast with you. Birds love a good morning ritual, they greet the day, and they greet you, and you AND the bird would be missing something if you were just showering and running off to work.

You're their flock, and you need to be there for them. Don't get a bird, at least, not a smart one. You'll just end up with a plucking or self mutilating bird in several years, and you won't have time to correct that either. The shelters are full of such birds.

Also, you didn't mention other things. Do you own your own home? Don't consider a bird if that's not the case. They'll be louder than you can possibly imagine, no pet store will ever prepare you for it. Are you pre-kids or post-kids? If you're pre-kids and get a smart bird, it may suffer attention loss when you have kids and start plucking. Google the parrot sites and read, read, read before you buy.
Hello, What are the effects of a parrot being in isolation from 8am to 6pm, 7 days a week? Trying ... alone for a work shift every day? Would like to know the effects on CAGS and Amazons and Mcaws. Gary.

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I work odd hours, but one thing remains. Everyone wants shoulder time when I get home. Each bird is different as any individual. If its way past their bed time, I scratch their heads in the cage and they go back to sleep. When it's their normal waking hours, it sounds like a zoo in here.
If there are two and they get on well, they shouldn't mind him missing too much. I had a grey that plucked when I was at work, but now I have four (!) greys, he's fine.
Hello, What are the effects of a parrot being in ... know the effects on CAGS and Amazons and Mcaws. Gary.

http://www.petersparrots.com
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http://www.petersphotos.com
For our 10th anniversary my wife and I vacationed in Hawaii, where we went snorkeling. After an hour in the water everyone got back on the boat, except for one beautiful young woman and me. As I continued my underwater exploring, I noticed that everywhere I swam, she swam. I snorkeled for another 20 minutes. So did she. I climbed back in the boat. So did she. I felt very flattered and, as I took off my fins, asked her coyly why she had stayed in the water for so long. "I'm the lifeguard," she replied matter-of-factly. "I couldn't get out until you did."
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