1  3 4 5 6 7 » 32
it doesn't matter who's property it happened on, since you've basically agreed to share property until you get a fence installed.

I'm 99.9% sure that the laws of Maryland would disagree with you. And in any case, I don't believe Cate agreed to share property.
that's what dog aggressive breeds do (i'm guessing pit?). if i shared >ayard with another dog aggressive breed, my dogs would be out on >leash, especially at night. it's just safer for everyone.

Which is why, IMO, her neighbors are idiots. The key thing, to me, is that this dog has already attacked several other dogs - this is more than just owning a dog of a breed with dog-aggression potential.
you knew the other dog was aggressive, and you agreed to share the yard.

I don't see anything in Cate's post saying she agreed to share her property with the neighbors; only that they agreed not to let their dog out to attack hers on her own property, and she agreed to avoid taking her dog out on her own property when their dog was out, to avoid being attacked.
i don't think you should or can take any sort of legal action here,

I do - for the sake of the NEXT dog this dog may attack. Again, this is a repeat offender, and her owners have NO business having her off a leash in an unfenced area, regardless of the fact that said unfenced area is their property.
She could just as easily attack someone walking by - and it sounds like she has made such attacks in the past. If the authorities are not aware of this, they should be.
Sorry, but I have zero tolerance for people with dogs they KNOW will do damage who refuse to keep them properly confined and/or controlled.
and i
I do - for the sake of the NEXT dog this dog may attack.

Forgot to say:
Another key factor to me is that Cate mentioned that the dog is female, and weighs 40 lbs. I can't remember if you were around when Cate was posting more regularly, so I'm not sure if you're aware that Orson is a large male Labrador - he's a good bit bigger than Brenin (I've met him), and Bren is 23
5.8" and nearly 60 lbs.

If Orson were smaller, he might not have survived this attack; what Cate describes certainly sounds like intent to kill.
What if the next dog this dog goes after doesn't have the good fortune to be twice her size?
We paid with our wallets: $1400 so far. Also, with guilt. My guilt is somewhat assuaged knowing I was able ... dogs before. - Both you and the neighbor were negligent as far as making sure no one was already outside.

I'd split it 50/50.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
She could just as easily attack someone walking by

To clarify that:
I mean that if someone walks by on the street with a dog, she's highly likely to go after the dog.
She could just as easily attack someone walking by - and it sounds like she has made such attacks in the past. If the authorities are not aware of this, they should be.

this dog fits the criteria for B City's vicious dog description. "A dog who has attacked or bitten a human being or another animal or was only prevented from doing so by a leash, fence, or other means." Exceptions are trespass, abuse, protection of self or young. None of those apply.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
If I were the neighbor I think I'd offer to pay for the whole thing. I might be inclined to ask for it depending on circumstances (mostly on the neighbor's attitude and willingness to correct the problem, somewhat on their financial circumstances).

Right after it happened, the owner did, more or less, offer to pay. He actually said "let me know how much this costs." Stupidly, I said I'd pay for the whole thing, because at that time, I assumed Orson needed only about $100 worth of stitches and exam costs. I felt, and still feel, that I equally share in the negligence that created the situation, so it was probably my guilt that led me to refuse money.

When we got the estimate I realized I'd made a mistake refusing the money. While Orson was in surgery, I left a phone message for the owner that we needed to talk again about it, as I hadn't anticipated the extent of care the dog would need, or the cost. I've yet to hear back from him, but I think I will.
It seems to me that there are (at least) two issues here: 1) covering expenses, and 2) making sure that ... either small claims court or a fine from the friendly local animal control officers and their friendly local ticket books).

Yeah, the money really isn't the issue for me. We need to fix the problems that led to this situation in the first place.

Cate
Ouch. Poor Orson! I hope he's feeling better.

He is, though I'm *** that his arthritis has been made worse.
Furthermore, I would be reporting the incident to A.C. and/or the police, since the dog is a repeat offender.

I don't feel I can elevate this to civil action unless the neighbors become hostile or non-responsive. I just can't afford to make an enemy of people who live 20 feet away. However, it didn't even occur to me to report the incident. Oh, crap.
Cate
Monday night our system failed.

I'm really and truly sorry for all of the dogs' injuries, but were you out there with them?

Yes. I was 10 feet away from Orson. I always stand outside when he's out there. We have a fenced yard, but our fence doesn't come up to our back door. The fence-free distance from door to the gate of our yard is about 20 feet. On a routine day, I spot for neighbor dogs, I let him out, he runs down the deck stairs and into the fenced area, and I stand on the deck and watch.
That night, I let him out and instantly saw the other dogs were out. He tried to run into our yard (on our property the entire time), and she silently ran over and attacked. She got to him before I could. (Her owner was about 25 feet away.) The 100lb dog ran over too, and I grabbed him while the smaller dog attacked Orson. The neighbor came and kicked his dog off Orson.
Cate
i would think your neighbors would offer to pay at least half, out of kindness or guilt. i know i would. however, if their dogs were already out, and you let yours out second, you technically are responsible for the break in the "system".

Morally, I agree.
it doesn't matter who's property it happened on, since you've basically agreed to share property until you get a fence installed.

Actually, our properties abut each other, with no fence in between. There is no agreement to share any property. It's our driveway that bounds their yard. We try to park our cars in a way such that their dogs have obstacles if they do come onto our property.
that's what dog aggressive breeds do (i'm guessing pit?). if i shared a yard with another dog aggressive breed, my dogs would be out on leash, especially at night. it's just safer for everyone.

I agree that I have to take measures to protect my dog due to this situation. And I feel negligent. However, I was already standing close by, and I couldn't stop the attack. Having Orson on a leash wouldn't have stopped it either, or even kept their dogs from coming onto my property. This is the point at which the burden is on them to keep their dogs on their own property.
Cate
Show more