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Another key factor to me is that Cate mentioned that the dog is female, and weighs 40 lbs. I can't ... kill. What if the next dog this dog goes after doesn't have the good fortune to be twice her size?

Well, this is what scares the living crap out of me. The attacking dog was 40 pounds, and despite my lack of experience with dog attacks, she certainly seemed like she was in it to win. Orson weighs 80 pounds. The male dog she lives with weighs 100 pounds (with no visible fat, only muscle) and is only 1 year old, still acting very much the puppy. He is currently not dog-aggressive, but I'm afraid he's going to learn that trait from the female. There's no doubt in my mind that if the male had attacked Orson, Orson wouldn't have survived.
Also, these people live on the corner. A quiet street with many pedestrians lots of them walking dogs abuts their unfenced yard. It seems only a matter of time before a passing dog is attacked. Maybe with an owner that isn't as concerned as I am about a feud between neighbors.
Cate
Ouch. Poor Orson! I hope he's feeling better.

He is, though I'm *** that his arthritis has been made worse.

Glad to hear he's recovering.. and worse arthritis definitely sucks. Given that Bren & I both have it, I can relate.

Hope you're feeling better, too - that must have been terrifying.
I don't feel I can elevate this to civil action unless the neighbors become hostile or non-responsive.

I wouldn't, either - but from my perspective, they sound like they're somewhat irresponsible to begin with. A dog capable of, and with a history of, that sort of unprovoked attack should never be off leash except in a securely fenced area.
Additionally, since they knew what she was capable of (I'm suspecting that you weren't entirely aware of how serious her attack would be), IMO they should have been actively notifying you any time they had the dog outdoors, not putting the responsibility on you.
I just can't afford to make an enemy of people who live 20 feet away.

Yes, that's always a concern.
However, it didn't even occur to me to report the incident. Oh, crap.

Wonder if it's too late at this point?
I'd split it 50/50.

That's what I feel most comfortable with and plan to ask for, if he ever calls me back. I dread his not calling me back about this. It makes my stomach hurt to think that, in addition to my dog's injuries, his trauma, and my cost, other outcomes could potentially include a nasty neighbor feud and his dog being put down.
Janet, since you have the experience you do with the city dog ordinances, I may contact you via email as this situation progresses. If it progresses.
Cate
Wonder if it's too late at this point?

nope. BCAC will come take the dog and a hearing can be scheduled.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Janet, since you have the experience you do with the city dog ordinances, I may contact you via email as this situation progresses. If it progresses.

please do. you can call me as well - e-mail for phone #.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
I'd split it 50/50.

That's what I feel most comfortable with and plan to ask for, if he ever calls me back. I dread ... do with the city dog ordinances, I may contact you via email as this situation progresses. If it progresses. Cate

I don't blame you for your apprehension. Bad neighbors are just not fun. But, on the other hand, no way should you be expected to swallow this kind of expense caused by THEIR dog on YOUR property. I'm sure Janet will help, but if he doesn't call back I'd make a copy of the bill and present it to him, along with an offer to split the cost of a fence. And, if you are good neighbors, a heartfelt and honest attempt to get them to understand that this dog is a real problem and it is their responsibility to keep it confined at all times.
I'm really and truly sorry for all of the dogs' injuries, but were you out there with them?

Given that Orson's blind, and the yard's not fenced yet, I'm betting Cate actually had him on leash.
nope. BCAC will come take the dog and a hearing can be scheduled.

i really think that's what ought to be done. Orson survived the attack, and will probably be okay, but there will be a next attack, and the victim may not be so lucky. giving this dog a free pass at this point is not a good idea, as the next dog to be attacked doesn't deserve it anymore than Orson did. if it were me, i would feel like it was my responsibility to do what i could to ensure a next attack couldn't happen. the first step would be reporting the attack on my dog.

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com /
Hope you're feeling better, too - that must have been terrifying.

I felt better until I posted about it here and realized that I essentially have the power to doom this dog.
I wouldn't, either - but from my perspective, they sound like they're somewhat irresponsible to begin with. A dog capable of, and with a history of, that sort of unprovoked attack should never be off leash except in a securely fenced area.

I'm trying not to inject my emotions into this, but yeah, they're not exactly models of responsibility.
It's also ironic to me that the dogs' ears are in tiny, harsh-looking fighting crops. When the male was a puppy, the owners delighted in having him wear a spiked collar.
Cate
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