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I'm 99.99% sure you already know this, but that's not a guarantee that he won't become aggressive towards Orson when he matures, particularly if he's intact.

Yep, fairly or not, I've suspected it might only be a matter of time for this male to become aggressive. In any case, I can't take the chance.
The last "he" there refers to the Pit, not Orson, right?

Correct. Orson came from an SPCA whose ad hoc policy it was (apparently because Orson looks purebred) to neuter him on the day he was adopted.

Cate
Correct. Orson came from an SPCA whose ad hoc policy it was (apparently because Orson looks purebred) to neuter him on the day he was adopted.

they don't neuter every dog?
-kelly
I am very concerned about this situation also and you may contact me by e-mail if this continues.
they don't neuter every dog?

Not at all uncommon in smaller and/or rural shelters, as also noted in Judy's post - especially if adopting out animals under six months of age.
Shelters are not the answer, concerned loving owners are and we all have to be owners due to all the dogm abuse. Shelters can be nice places if they are run by loving people and I think it is sad also.
Poor Orson. No dogs should be on leashes as Dr. Gutsy Do Right Dog has written her book that is free on the world wide web about dog training non-violently. Ghandi said that we can know a nation by the way it treats it's animals and this is certainly a good example.
I am very concerned about this situation also and you may contact me by e-mail if this continues.

Your first intelligible post! Congratulations.
A google groups link to anyone considering replying privately to this individual:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?T1E15284C

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
Correct. Orson came from an SPCA whose ad hoc policy ... purebred) to neuter him on the day he was adopted.

they don't neuter every dog?

They do. Or rather, they make sure they're all neutered. I wrote what I did the way I did because the way they did it with me was a new policy.
It had been their policy that every dog, once adopted, was sent home with a voucher for free or low-cost neutering/spaying within an agreed-upon time. They'd call the new owner to make sure it'd been done, and they'd verify with the vet if they felt like it. They reserved the right to reclaim the dog if the neutering/spay time elapsed with no surgery.
However, there was a lot of demand for Orson, which got their hackles up that we all wanted to make beautiful baby Orsons, so they made up a new policy on the spot: on the day he was free to be adopted, they delivered him to a vet of my choosing. I couldn't pick him up until the surgery was done.
If I remember right the adoption fee was $120 and the neutering was included in that.
Cate
$180 dollars for a dog is cheap, as they are our best friends.
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