1 3 4 5  7 8 » 32
Yes. I was 10 feet away from Orson. I always stand outside when he's out there. We have a fenced ... too, and I grabbed him while the smaller dog attacked Orson. The neighbor came and kicked his dog off Orson.

What a nightmare. Under those circumstances, where she was right there and clearly had no control over either of her dogs, on your property, she will hopefully be receptive to the idea of paying most/all of Orson's expenses. And Melinda's suggestion is an excellent approach. I'm not sure I'd be comfortable having my next-door neighbor's dog impounded and destroyed, but the neighbor does need to know that this is a possibility.
Mustang Sally
Legally, that may be true, mostly because you both agreed on that system for letting your dogs out.

Even though I keep saying we have an agreement, it's unspoken, de facto. There has never been any conversation about it. It's just what we've historically done.
How's Orson doing?

I just woke him up because he was yelping in his sleep, poor guy. He's doing pretty well, though. The vet said yesterday that when the bandages come off tomorrow, we'll be horrified by the bruising. I'm already shocked by the extent of the swelling, and just yesterday his leg began to shake sometimes. He gets crated at night on the first floor so he doesn't have to do stairs any more than necessary. The range of motion in the leg has improved a lot.
He's also gone off his favorite snack: whole carrots. So he's getting some pig ears instead.
Cate
There is no fence between our neighbors' house and ours ... as far as making sure no one was already outside.

i would think your neighbors would offer to pay at least half, out of kindness or guilt. i know i ... doesn't matter who's property it happened on, since you've basically agreed to share property until you get a fence installed.

I don't think that's what Cate said. She didn't say they shared a yard; she said they shared a system for not letting their dogs out at the same time. That does change the situation somewhat, but it most certainly does not mean that it doesn't matter on whose property the attack occurred. That always matters.
Mustang Sally
Once they have the yard fenced, what do you think the odds are that they'll leave the dogs out there ... - that a fence preventing an attack won't preclude their dog being deemed dangerous if they live in the city.

I'm shocked to learn that Baltimore can classify as vicious a dog who aggresses at the fence line. Orson barks along our fenceline sometimes when he's out for a pee, so I can't even go down that road.

If they have a fence containing their dogs, and their dogs aren't left outside for a long time to bark incessantly, and their dogs aren't neglected (IMO), then I'll be satisfied.
Cate
I'm shocked to learn that Baltimore can classify as vicious a dog who aggresses at the fence line. Orson barks along our fenceline sometimes when he's out for a pee, so I can't even go down that road.

I would say the majority of dog owners in BCity have no idea what the law says! Of course, PROVING that if the fence wasn't present, the dog would bite or attack, is another story. Very hard to prove in Orson's case, very easily proved in the neighbor's case.

For the record, in 5 years of holding hearings, I never heard one on a dog "possibly" being able to be deemed vicious from their actions behind a fence or on leash.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Legally, that may be true, mostly because you both agreed on that system for letting your dogs out.

Even though I keep saying we have an agreement, it's unspoken, de facto. There has never been any conversation about it. It's just what we've historically done.

Well, that's an entirely different story then, IMO. As far as I'm concerned there is no agreement. You let your blind dog out into your yard, went outside with him, he was attacked by one of the neighbor's dogs (which has attacked other dog(s) before), and both you and she were unable to prevent it despite being 10 feet away. It's clearly their fault, and I would try very diplomatically to make them see how this situation would be viewed by AC or the courts, and that they have a moral and legal responsibility to make sure their dog doesn't do this again. Even if they immediately take measures to prevent that happening, they still should pay for Orson's vet bills.
I just woke him up because he was yelping in his sleep, poor guy. He's doing pretty well, though. The ... doesn't have to do stairs any more than necessary. The range of motion in the leg has improved a lot.

What exactly were his injuries? Yep, you will be horrified by the bruising. There's usually a lot of pulling and shaking involved in dog fights, which causes tearing of the skin away from the fascia and horrific bruising.
He's also gone off his favorite snack: whole carrots. So he's getting some pig ears instead.

Good that he's eating some snacks, poor guy. Our crew sends white light and good thoughts for his recovery.
Mustang Sally
Legally, that may be true, mostly because you both agreed on that system for letting your dogs out.

Even though I keep saying we have an agreement, it's unspoken, de facto. There has never been any conversation about it. It's just what we've historically done.

Um. I think this makes a BIG difference. I wouldn't say you've got an agreement; I'd say that so far you had (sensibly) managed to avoid letting your dogs out when your neighbor's dog-aggressive dog is around. There was a mistake here, but not in your failure to observe the neighbors' dog in your yard when you let yours out; the main mistake is your neighbors allowing their known dog-aggressive dog around other dogs without supervision under any circumstances. It seems to me that they should be liable for the entire vet bill.
And I agree with you that the fence situation needs to be addressed ASAP. What a hard way to learn that lesson. Poor Orson. Give him an ear-scritch from me, OK?
Dianne
What exactly were his injuries? Yep, you will be horrified by the bruising. There's usually a lot of pulling and shaking involved in dog fights, which causes tearing of the skin away from the fascia and horrific bruising.

There was definitely shaking. It was horrible. He essentially just has deep bite wounds and soft tissue damage skin pulled away from the fascia, like you said cellulitis, etc. During surgery the vet opened the lacerations wider to clean it all out really well, and put the drain in. X-rays show no bone damage. They don't think there's joint damage. The bites were concentrated on the upper part of the inside of the foreleg and in the "armpit" area.
Good that he's eating some snacks, poor guy. Our crew sends white light and good thoughts for his recovery.

Thanks!
Cate
There was definitely shaking. It was horrible. He essentially just has deep bite wounds and soft tissue damage skin pulled away ... damage. The bites were concentrated on the upper part of the inside of the foreleg and in the "armpit" area.

For some reason I'd pictured neck wounds, but maybe Orson's leg was more accessible to the other dog. The armpit area's got to be sensitive, though. Give him some rubs from me in an undamaged spot.

Good luck in dealing with your neighbor. Hopefully they'll be reasonable and responsible. Seeing Orson with his bandages off should help.
Mustang Sally
Show more