Some here will remember my adventures in July with a *** needing emergency surgery and hand-rearing the only two surviving puppies. The puppies, Lucky and Sugar, are now nearly four months old, and we've acquired another one, their nephew, Tug. Tug is big; Lucky and Sugar are finally starting to grow after seeming kinda puny for awhile. Today, while we were training them, John was about
100 yards downslope throwing a mark in medium cover,and I ran Sugar.
While she was on her way to her first mark, I saw a dog running towards her from an unexpected direction, beyond John. My glasses were spotted with rain and I couldn't see clearly. It looked like a fox-red Lab, but the only one we have now was secure on the dog truck. I started running towards Sugar and the strange dog, in case it might be aggressive towards a puppy. Sugar, of course, was a lot faster than I, but I hoped to at least distract it. As I got closer I could tell it had a pointy nose and ears, and figured it must be the neighbor's shepherd mix.
The neighbors have mentioned their dog having aggressive tendencies, so I kept running and yelling, "Sugar! Sugar!" Sugar, being intent on her mark, didn't slow down. John yelled something I didn't get. Getting closer, I saw the stranger was smaller than our neighbor's dog, and didn't have a saddle marking. I realized what John had said "coyote." I wondered if a coyote would attack a 15-20-lb. puppy with two humans close by, one bearing down on it, albeit not very fast, and shouting.
The animal loped right by Sugar, and then past me, running parallel to our neighbor's fence. It didn't seem concerned about me at all. It was big, filled-out, and healthy looking, maybe 60-lb plus.
John said afterwards he could clearly see the characteristic white marking around the mouth. I couldn't, because of the water on my glasses. We had heard from a couple of sources that there are coyotes around, but this is the first we'd seen.

In the end Sugar was distracted from her mark, but we repeated and she nailed it, and then another.
Amy Dahl
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Some here will remember my adventures in July with a *** needing emergency surgery and hand-rearing the only two surviving ... the end Sugar was distracted from her mark, but we repeated and she nailed it, and then another. Amy Dahl

That sounds like a real adrenaline pumper!
I have been around a coyotes in California quite a lot. They have always been timid and reclusive around me, except the ones that have been trained by tourists that humans will feed them... I am surprised he ran right by you like that. He must have been hell bent on something.

Have you ever heard of coyotes randomly attacking dogs? I shouldn't think you have anything to worry about, but I suppose coyotes are different in different parts of the country, and unhealthy coyotes would also be a concern. Personally, I love to hear them howling at night when I'm camping.

"Lynne" lover of mutts and feral kitties
HOWE COME your INSTANT RELIABLE COME COMMAND FAILED?

Or was you too scared to scream "come" and
push the big red button marked BURN?
BWEEEAAAHAHAHAA!!!
Some here will remember my adventures in July with a *** needing emergency surgery and hand-rearing the only two surviving ... the end Sugar was distracted from her mark, but we repeated and she nailed it, and then another. Amy Dahl==

I understand how you must have felt.
Last week, when I was walking my Rottie in the forest, a large coyote ran across the path in front of us, and my dog took off like crazy after it. I kept calling my dog to come, but I never thought she would return in one piece. Lucky for me she did come back when I called. That shook me up also. I am sure you thought that was the end of your dog.
Lynne (Email Removed) said in
Have you ever heard of coyotes randomly attacking dogs?

Those in our city parks plan their attacks, nothing random about it. The most common gambit is two playing together, enticing dogs to join, and then gamboling into the scrub where the rest of the coyote pack awaits.
Right now is the worst time of the year - after work dog walking happens at dusk when coyotes seem to be out. "In the old days" (four or five years ago), I'd carry a waving stick to scare off the coyotes. Then I started to carry a throwing stick. Now, my lifestyle allows me to walk dogs in the middle of the day, so I don't need a stick.
There have been at least two coyote attacks on children here, and yes, like you, I put a lot of the blame on people who feed the wildlife.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
There have been at least two coyote attacks on children here, and yes, like you, I put a lot of the blame on people who feed the wildlife.

I didn't see the post to which you're responding, but around here, people "feed" the wildlife by keeping chickens and guinea fowl, and feed for their animals that may attract rats and mice. I think coyotes are smart; this one didn't need to be deliberately fed to know that a couple of slow humans in a field were no threat.

Amy Dahl
There have been at least two coyote attacks on children ... lot of the blame on people who feed the wildlife.

I didn't see the post to which you're responding, but around here, people "feed" the wildlife by keeping chickens and ... to be deliberately fed to know that a couple of slow humans in a field were no threat. Amy Dahl

wow, I've been killfiled?

"Lynne" lover of mutts and feral kitties
There have been at least two coyote attacks on children here, and yes, like you, I put a lot of the blame on people who feed the wildlife.

that's all some scary stuff. I may never look at coyotes the same again... In what part of the country are you located, Matt?

"Lynne" lover of mutts and feral kitties
Amy Dahl (Email Removed) said in
I didn't see the post to which you're responding, but around here, people "feed" the wildlife by keeping chickens and guinea fowl, and feed for their animals that may attract rats and mice.

I live in a city of a million that has many large parks; there are some who purposely feed wildlife - geese, for example, now live here year round, even through -30degC weather. Others think it's a good idea to toss leftover pizza and KFC to coyotes from apartment balconies.
But you're correct - it's the consistent supply of city livestock which really keeps the coyotes around here (in their original habit, we shouldn't forget), like outdoor cats and backyard dogs.
I think coyotes are smart; this one didn't need to be deliberately fed to know that a couple of slow humans in a field were no threat.

Coyotes are incredibly smart and extremely adaptable. I don't understand your last statement, though. I've never really seen them afraid of humans, just inconvenienced to the point of going elsewhere.
FWIW, I've seen coyote doing what you described in your original post - he was likely on a mission that didn't involve you or yours.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
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