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If your husband isn't a big dog fan but is willing to live with them to please you then I think you're correct in doing whatever you can to make the puppy's existence as much a non-issue as possible.

I agree completely.
Some people can't understand how terrible it is to live with sleep issues and how disruptive they can be to daily life. If they did then I don't think they'd be acting like your husband is a bad guy in this situation.

I was taken aback at people's responses on the subject, and the level of apparent ignorance on it from people I otherwise consider sensible.
Have you found (in Terri's case, if you haven't used it yet, will you let me know if you find) that the melatonin affects your dreaming?

Not me, but I've heard other people report that it does for them.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Since George Bush took office, foreign lenders have been the source for over 80% of US government borrowing
I'm on way to run some early errands one of ... after waking that is really beginning to get to me.

Question for both of you: Have you found (in Terri's case, if you haven't used it yet, will you let ... and reports that when he tried melatonin, he had such weird, disturbing, and hallucinatory dreams that he discontinued its use.

Well, after a week of trying it I have the following to report. It hasn't made any difference in my dreams that I know of but then I've had weird, disturbing and extremely vivid dreams for as long as I can remember. This week I just haven't remembered any dreams but that could be that I was getting the sleep cycle I needed. It's too soon to draw any conclusions based on that but what it has done is allow me to roll over and go back to sleep so from that aspect, it's a success. I also have had none of that groggy headed feeling in the morning that prevents me from trying OTC sleep aids.
I didn't take any last night and woke up early again but that could also be due to a prolonged period of conditioned response and again, it's too early to for me to draw any conclusions just yet.
FWIW, from the research I've done it's like any other medicine, natural or not, in that it can work different ways on different people. One just has to try it and see for themselves how they respond to it.
Terri

Is there any proof that English borrows words?? I mean, have we ever given one back? Do we pay for a replacement if we break one? How does this work?
Matthew
Last night was a success!!! We had a dry night.

Yay!

We haven't had a single problem with him peeing in his crate since then. I guess I panicked because it happened
2 nights in a row. I've been following all of Jack's suggestions,except for the alarm. Lexi has been getting up once a night, around 5:30am. The past 2 days he's needed to poo as well as pee at that time. Today after I put him back in his crate he let me sleep until almost 8:00! Yay!!

Another promising development is that I actually managed to catch him mid-dribble twice today, and scoop him up and get him outside. I'm encouraged by that since he was getting the positive reinforcement for going outside, but nothing negative for going inside. Not that I yelled or anything just "uh, uh" and scooping him up. But enough that he might start making the connection.
Today was a good day all around. The weather was
much cooler than it has been, so we were outside a good portion of the day working, and he was there
with us, and so didn't require quite the same level of eagle-eyed attention. It was a nice break. Then
he took a nap with me on the sofa.
Bizby
Ack! I've messed up already!
Group: rec.pets.dogs.behavior Date: Fri, Jul 22, 2005, 7:02am From: (Email Removed) (bizby40)
Okay, I'm pretty mad at myself here. I was operating under two basic assumptions: First, that a puppy would not "go" in his crate unless he had no other choice, and second, that he would indicate any distress through whining. I figure the second assumption is the one that got me in trouble.
Here's the deal: When I last housetrained a puppy, 14 years ago, she was in a crate in my room at night. At some point she'd start whining, and I'd take her out, being very quiet and making sure not to turn it into a play session, and then I'd take her back inside as soon as she'd done her business and put her back in her crate until morning. She was 12 weeks old when I got her, and it didn't take her long at all to start sleeping through the night.My new puppy is only 9 weeks old now. The first few nights, he didn't start whining until pretty late oh, say 4:30am or so. I'd take him out, and it would be 20 minutes at least before he did his business. That alone confused me, as logic would dictate that he should really need to go badly by that point! Yesterday he didn't start whining until 5:30, and when I let him out, I realized there was an odor. I pulled out his puppy blanket, and found he'd urinated on it we'd had the blanket out every day, so I'm sure this is the first day it happened.

Aargh! Okay, so my first inclination was not to give him his blanket last night, thinking that having something absorbent in there with him was the problem. This morning he didn't start whining until 6am. I came down to get him, and could smell it as soon as I opened the door. With nothing to absorb it except Lexi himself, he was soaked! I did take him out, but of course there was nothing left for him to do. So, he started his day today with a bath.
So, now what? I'm assuming that I will need to set an alarm and let him out at, what, 2 or 3 am? When I crate him again in the middle of the night without playing with him to tire him out, he doesn't settle back down for a couple of hours. I can't have him whining for that long in the house as he will wake everyone up. I could put the crate in the garage, but well, I hate doing that.
The thing that really worries me is that now I'm just screwed. That he already has it in his head that the crate is a place to pee, and he'll have no reason now to even try to hold it.
Any advice?
BizbyWhen I got my dog Kathrin & her sister Thorndyke 11 years ago. They were 8- 10 weks old. Got Thorndyke first then Kathrin. never even thought of getting a crate. They stayed with us in our bedroom & I had to do take them outside every few hours so they could relieve themselves. Night time after 7 p.m No food no water. Not once did I have a bathroom problem. These dogs were part lab. Did you ever have 2 big puppies go under your bed on their back & both sort of do a bicycle thing so your mattress moves? Ha!.

Well we only had Thorndyke until Nov.5th 1998. She ended up having bone cancer in her skull & she had to be put to sleep but we still have Kathrin. I myself don't believe in crates or putting my dog in another room or anything like that. Kathrin (aka) Sweetheart & Thorndyke (aka) Baby always were allowed to sleep with us.
Another promising development is that I actually managed to catch him mid-dribble twice today, and scoop him up and get ... yelled or anything just "uh, uh" and scooping him up. But enough that he might start making the connection.

Another yay! That's definitely something many pups need in order to have the lightbulb go on - Rocsi did.
And you're handling it just right for his age IMO; just interrupt with a mild verbal, grab him up, rush outside, and praise for finishing out there.
Another promising development is that I actually managed to catch ... up. But enough that he might start making the connection.

Another yay! That's definitely something many pups need in order to have the lightbulb go on - Rocsi did. ... his age IMO; just interrupt with a mild verbal, grab him up, rush outside, and praise for finishing out there.

Thanks. I'm keeping my fingers crossed, but we really do seem to have reached a milestone here. He's certainly not reliable yet, and I can't let my guard down, but as I said, he does seem to be starting to "get it". I'm encouraged anyway,

Bizby