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My husband is not crazy about dogs. He doesn't mind them in the same room, but doesn't want them keeping him awake.

Human sleep disruption is one of the big disadvantages of getting a puppy instead of an adult dog. It pretty much comes with the territory, It does end, however, and probably sooner than you think. In the meantime, the effort you put into housetraining now, into teaching him that whining doesn't bring a big payoff, and so on will help him become a better pet as he matures. It's worth it.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Average real weekly wages are lower today than they were at the end of the 2001 recession.
Because my husband is in my room. It's okay if he whines and then I get up and take him ... the next two hours after I put him back. I'm not sure how to get him to stop doing that.

Can the husband.
If he's in your room, right next to your bed, with your fingers through the crate, he probably will NOT whine for 2 hours. Guess you and hubby don't have any kids? Tell the husband tough - the puppy is a baby and he's new and needs to learn. Geesh.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Yes, that I've been doing. The reference in the first ... back in and I assume that's why he's been whining.

He's probably been whining to get you to let him out of the crate. He's been training you very well; not it's time to train him.

Excellent point. NEVER let a puppy out of its crate when it is whining to get out.
I doubt that your puppy's whining indicates a need to pee, since he hasn't yet fully absorbed the idea that he shouldn't pee indoors. Give him a good chew toy to occupy him in his crate at night I'd suggest something somewhat edible, like those bones made of potato starch, that he can chew for hours and hours. That will likely help keep him quiet.
And I agree that you should set your alarm and get up for a while. In my experience it doesn't take anything like 4 months, though. More like a week or so, if you are following the suggested schedule of withholding water after 7 pm and taking serveral potty breaks during the evening. But I'm sure this depends on the breed and the individual.
If you've been doing your job correctly, there can be no other reason for his whining. His bladder is essentially ... to think of the old Fram oil filter commercial: "You can pay me now, or you can pay me later."

Very, very true.
Our dog has a verry unique way of whning when she needs to go th the grass. She will whine in a way that sounds like "out". If we don't respond, she will bang up against the bed and not stop until she gets us to help her, or..
Our dog has a verry unique way of whning when she needs to go th the grass. She will whine ... don't respond, she will bang up against the bed and not stop until she gets us to help her, or..

it sounds like she's a smart dog to me. why did you describe her as stupid?

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net >> http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com

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Because my husband is in my room. It's okay if ... not sure how to get him to stop doing that.

Can the husband. If he's in your room, right next to your bed, with your fingers through the crate, he ... any kids? Tell the husband tough - the puppy is a baby and he's new and needs to learn. Geesh.

Yes, we have kids, and yes, it was a pretty miserable couple of years for my husband as he has trouble sleeping at the best of times. But the pets are all my idea and my responsibility.

On the other hand, we seem to have a philosophical difference here between members of the group. If I'm supposed to set an alarm, get him out on a schedule, and ignore his whining, then what is the point of him being in the room? Wouldn't paying attention to him, and even putting my fingers through the crate be reinforcing the behavior?
Bizby
Yes. Take him out to the same spot each time, where he'll always find previous "tokens" of his outside visits. Use the cue term religiously and repeatedly it will help to signal him to "go."

Thanks again for the updates.
Bizby
On the other hand, we seem to have a philosophical difference here between members of the group. If I'm supposed ... in the room? Wouldn't paying attention to him, and even putting my fingers through the crate be reinforcing the behavior?

Did I say to do it while he was whining? Nope. It's a reassurance. Kind of like sitting next to a crib but not picking the baby up and out.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Yes, we have kids, and yes, it was a pretty miserable couple of years for my husband as he has ... the room? Wouldn't paying attention to him, and even putting my fingers through the crate be reinforcing the behavior? Bizby

That's a good question. My feeling is that a puppy just gets lonely all by itself. As a pack animal, and a recent member of a litter, the puppy finds it comforting to sleep with the pack: that is, you. It is a bonding thing also. The idea is not to ignore his whining completely just not to let him train you to let him out of the crate when he whines. (When he's older and housebroken, he'll be able to tell you if he really does have an emergency that's when I'd act on the whining.) In the meantime, you can say his name and tell him to go to sleep or put your fingers through the crate, or whatever just don't let him out.
What you accomplish by making sure he has an empty bladder at the start of the night and by setting the alarm to take him out is that a) you are making sure you take him out of the crate on your terms, not his, and b) you are making sure that he is neither uncomfortable nor growing accustomed to peeing in his crate in the meantime. Just leaving him in the crate for long periods would be setting him up for failure.
IIRC the Monks of New Skete have a good thing on this in The Art of Raising a Puppy. I really liked that book.
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