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Said like man who doesn't know my hubby. It's true that he learned to sleep right through the kids crying ... to that. But I do need to do everything I can to ensure that he personally isn't inconvenienced too much.

Well I, for one, applaud you for easing the way for your husband rather than allowing the puppy to become a nuisance to him. I didn't want several of the dogs my husband brought home and I found it excruciatingly hard to live with them because they became sore spots for me. If your husband isn't a big dog fan but is willing to live with them to please you then I think you're correct in doing whatever you can to make the puppy's existence as much a non-issue as possible.
He shouldn't have to move from his bed, in his room, to accomodate a puppy he doesn't really want but is willing to live with if you do the raising. Some people can't understand how terrible it is to live with sleep issues and how disruptive they can be to daily life. If they did then I don't think they'd be acting like your husband is a bad guy in this situation.

Tara
Excellent point. NEVER let a puppy out of its crate when it is whining to get out.

Sorry, but I think this is Really Bad Advice - and a prescription for not only having the puppy eliminate in the crate, but for poor communication later on.

Why, in the absence of obvious need (which you've eliminated already by assuring that the pup's bladder/bowel is empty before putting him in his crate), do you think it's generally a good idea (which I assume you must) to respond to a puppy's whining in his crate by always giving in to it and letting him out of the crate?
What exactly is that going to accomplish that's desirable?

The only thing you're "communicating" to the pup, IMO, is:

Whine = get out of jail free card.
There's a HUGE difference between giving in to a puppy temper tantrum, and ignoring normal communication.

This puppy, in my opinion, is "communicating" but one thing (if you've done your job correctly) I want out of this crate.

Plus, by moving the crate into the bedroom, so that he can be with his pack, smell his pack, see his pack, etc., you've automatically eliminated a major part of the reason for his whining.

So maybe you would be kind enough to elaborate further on why you think that this interferes somehow with "communication."

I've raised hundreds of puppies over the years in just this way, and house-trained them in a matter of days usually, rarely longer than a few weeks, and I've never had any difficulties communicating with them "later on." In fact, if I were able to communicate with them any better than I do, someone might think that I was telepathic.

How exactly could such Really Bad Advice have been so successful for me(and for countless millions of others), Sarah?
I'm really puzzled now, help me out.

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply by e-mail
Said like man who doesn't know my hubby. It's true ... can to ensure that he personally isn't inconvenienced too much.

Well I, for one, applaud you for easing the way for your husband rather than allowing the puppy to become ... If they did then I don't think they'd be acting like your husband is a bad guy in this situation.

Oh, I understand sleep issues. I had them before thyroid cancer and thyroidectomies completely destroyed up my metabolism, which was only partially messed up before. DH snores like some kind of heavy machinery, even after having that snore surgery. And then there's menopause and hot flashes...So yeah, I undersand sleep issues. But the fact of the matter is that puppy housebreaking, puppy whining at night, and other inconveniences are part of having a puppy.

Mustang Sally
Well I, for one, applaud you for easing the way ... like your husband is a bad guy in this situation.

Oh, I understand sleep issues. I had them before thyroid cancer and thyroidectomies completely destroyed up my metabolism, which was ... of the matter is that puppy housebreaking, puppy whining at night, and other inconveniences are part of having a puppy.

Absolutely but it doesn't sound like the husband agreed to the puppy & all that goes with the deal so much as relented to his wife having one as long as she took care of it. If that was the deal then she needs to take care of it in a manner that doesn't upset the husband IMO.

Tara
Oh, I understand sleep issues. I had them before thyroid ... night, and other inconveniences are part of having a puppy.

Absolutely but it doesn't sound like the husband agreed to the puppy & all that goes with the deal so ... was the deal then she needs to take care of it in a manner that doesn't upset the husband IMO.

I guess so. The pastor who married DH and me said that marriage isn't 50/50; it's 90/10, 80/20, etc., and the side the 90 is on switches back and forth. I don't know if that makes any sense, I've been enjoying the fruit of the vine tonight. Fostering may be mostly my idea at this point, though DH was all in favor of starting our adoption group years ago. But I put up with plenty of things I really don't want to that are his idea. That's what marriage is about.
Mustang Sally
He shouldn't have to move from his bed, in his room, to accomodate a puppy he doesn't really want but ... If they did then I don't think they'd be acting like your husband is a bad guy in this situation.

Thanks for understanding. I wouldn't suggest he be the one to move out except that he actually sleeps better in that room. It's on the back of the house and only has one window. It's the quietest, darkest room in the house. Our room, unfortunately, is right next to the back stairs, which acts as a funnel for all the downstairs noise. :-( The only reasons why we don't switch with our son are that our room has a bathroom and larger closets. He actually has a plan to renovate the upstairs which includes turning our son's room into a master bedroom, so we can move in there. So being able to sleep in there for a while could be considered a treat.
Bizby
How big is the crate? The rule of thumb I was taught was that there should be just enough room ... box, making it about 1/3 it's original size. As she grew, we collapsed the box to give her more room.

I don't think it's the crate that is the problem. It's actually our cat carrier. If we continue to use a crate as Lexi grows, we'll have to get him a larger one. I took a picture, but flickr isn't cooperating right now, so I can't post it.
Thanks for the suggestion though.
Bizby
I said in another post that I may move him to my son's room for the duration.

That's a good solution as long as your son is willing and capable of taking him outside when the pup fusses at 2am.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
He shouldn't have to move from his bed, in his room, to accomodate a puppy he doesn't really want but is willing to live with if you do the raising.

Of course not - those that suggested such a thing were joking.

I just can't comprehend the sleeping issue. When I'm tired, I sleep - I used to be a selective sleeper, but that was dog years ago.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
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