Okay, I'm pretty mad at myself here. I was operating under two basic assumptions: First, that a puppy would not "go" in his crate unless he had no other choice, and second, that he would indicate any distress through whining. I figure the second assumption is the one that got me in trouble.

Here's the deal: When I last housetrained a puppy, 14 years ago, she was in a crate in my room at night. At some point she'd start whining, and I'd take her out, being very quiet and making sure not to turn it into a play session, and then I'd take her back inside as soon as she'd done her business and put her back in her crate until morning. She was 12 weeks old when I got her, and it didn't take her long at all to start sleeping through the night.
My new puppy is only 9 weeks old now. The first few nights, he didn't start whining until pretty late oh, say 4:30am or so. I'd take him out, and it would be 20 minutes at least before he did his business. That alone confused me, as logic would dictate that he should really need to go badly by that point! Yesterday he didn't start whining until 5:30, and when I let him out, I realized there was an odor. I pulled out his puppy blanket, and found he'd urinated on it we'd had the blanket out every day, so I'm sure this is the first day it happened. Aargh!
Okay, so my first inclination was not to give him his blanket last night, thinking that having something absorbent in there with him was the problem. This morning he didn't start whining until 6am. I came down to get him, and could smell it as soon as I opened the door. With nothing to absorb it except Lexi himself, he was soaked! I did take him out, but of course there was nothing left for him to do. So, he started his day today with a bath.

So, now what? I'm assuming that I will need to set an alarm and let him out at, what, 2 or 3 am? When I crate him again in the middle of the night without playing with him to tire him out, he doesn't settle back down for a couple of hours. I can't have him whining for that long in the house as he will wake everyone up. I could put the crate in the garage, but well, I hate doing that.
The thing that really worries me is that now I'm just screwed. That he already has it in his head that the crate is a place to pee, and he'll have no reason now to even try to hold it.
Any advice?
Bizby
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When I last housetrained a puppy, 14 years ago, she was in a crate in my room at night. My new puppy is only 9 weeks old now. .. I came down to get him,

Why isn't he in your room?

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
How big is the crate? The rule of thumb I was taught was that there should be just enough room in the crate for the puppy to stand up and turn around: anything larger is too large.
When Macula was an itty-bitty puppy, we had the back of the crate blocked off by a cardboard box, making it about 1/3 it's original size. As she grew, we collapsed the box to give her more room.
Marie
()
Any advice? Bizby

Yes.
1. Ditch the bedding from the crate, after cleaning it completely with agood enzyme cleaner.
2. Put the crate back in your bedroom, where it belongs (at least untilhe's reliably house-trained).
3. Stop giving your pup access to water after 7:00 pm.
4. Take your pup outside to "go" at least twice after his last drink,three times is even better (make absolutely certain that his bladder is empty before putting him back in the crate that last time).
5. Set your alarm for midway through the night (between when you put himin his crate for the last time and when you get up to let him out in the morning) and get up and take him outside to "go." DO NOT PLAY WITH THE PUPPY! Give him roughly 5 minutes to "go," always using the same cue, e.g., "Hurry up!" etc. Praise him when he "goes."
6. Bring him back inside and put him inside his crate. DO NOT PLAY WITHTHE PUPPY!
7. Go back to sleep.

When he's about 4 months old, you can start to reconsider if it's really necessary to get up and let him outside in the middle of the night. That is, he should be able to hold it throughout an entire night by then. This of course varies somewhat by dog, breed, etc.

PS: If you regulate his input, you'll also be regulating his output. SO PAY ATTENTION! STICK TO A SCHEDULE! So there's no reason to succumb to his whining in his crate. Go to sleep at approximately the same time every night (yes, even on week-ends) and get up at approximately the same time each morning.

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to send me e-mail
When I last housetrained a puppy, 14 years ago, she ... old now. .. I came down to get him,

Why isn't he in your room?

Because my husband is in my room. It's okay if he whines and then I get up and take him out. But it's not okay if he then whines for the next two hours after I put him back. I'm not sure how to get him to stop doing that.
Bizby
1. Ditch the bedding from the crate, after cleaning it completely with a good enzyme cleaner.

Okay.
2. Put the crate back in your bedroom, where it belongs (at least until he's reliably house-trained).

I just don't know how I can do that if he is going to whine for a long time after I put him back in his crate. I can nap some during the day when he's tired, but my husband has to work all day.
3. Stop giving your pup access to water after 7:00 pm.

Okay.
4. Take your pup outside to "go" at least twice after his last drink, three times is even better (make absolutely certain that his bladder is empty before putting him back in the crate that last time).

Okay.
5. Set your alarm for midway through the night (between when you put him in his crate for the last ... him roughly 5 minutes to "go," always using the same cue, e.g., "Hurry up!" etc. Praise him when he "goes."

Okay. And if he doesn't go in that five minutes? Do I put him back in until morning? He seems to have a need to sniff around for a while before going.
6. Bring him back inside and put him inside his crate. DO NOT PLAY WITH THE PUPPY!

Yes, that I've been doing. The reference in the first post was not to indicate that I had been playing with him at night, but that a good play session during the day would tire him out, and since I'm not doing that at night, he's wide awake when he goes back in and I assume that's why he's been whining.
7. Go back to sleep.

lol I can try.
When he's about 4 months old, you can start to reconsider if it's really necessary to get up and let ... be able to hold it throughout an entire night by then. This of course varies somewhat by dog, breed, etc.

okay.
PS: If you regulate his input, you'll also be regulating his output. SO PAY ATTENTION! STICK TO A SCHEDULE! So ... approximately the same time every night (yes, even on week-ends) and get up at approximately the same time each morning.

Thanks for the advice!
Bizby
Because my husband is in my room. It's okay if he whines and then I get up and take him ... the next two hours after I put him back. I'm not sure how to get him to stop doing that.

If you don't have the pup in the room with you, you're not going to know when he gets up and starts moving around - - a sign of impending urination or defecation. Your husband doesn't like being in the same room with dogs?
Mustang Sally
Because my husband is in my room. It's okay if ... not sure how to get him to stop doing that.

If you don't have the pup in the room with you, you're not going to know when he gets up and starts moving around - - a sign of impending urination or defecation. Your husband doesn't like being in the same room with dogs?

My husband is not crazy about dogs. He doesn't mind them in the same room, but doesn't want them keeping him awake. If I must be in the same room as the puppy, I'm either going to have to move my hubby out, or sleep downstairs with the puppy.
Bizby
()
5. Set your alarm for midway through the night (between ... cue, e.g., "Hurry up!" etc. Praise him when he "goes."

Okay. And if he doesn't go in that five minutes? Do I put him back in until morning?

Yes. Take him out to the same spot each time, where he'll always find previous "tokens" of his outside visits.
Use the cue term religiously and repeatedly it will help to signal him to "go."
6. Bring him back inside and put him inside his crate. DO NOT PLAY WITH THE PUPPY!

Yes, that I've been doing. The reference in the first post was not to indicate that I had been playing ... doing that at night, he's wide awake when he goes back in and I assume that's why he's been whining.

He's probably been whining to get you to let him out of the crate. He's been training you very well; not it's time to train him.

If you've been doing your job correctly, there can be no other reason for his whining. His bladder is essentially empty, etc.

Yes, your husband may have to listen to a little whining for a few nights (because you've been TRAINING him to whine). If you keep letting the puppy out when he's whining (reinforcing the whining), your husband is going to have to listen to the whining indefinitely. Raising puppies, children, etc. sometimes require sacrifices.
Either you're willing to make them, or you're not.

The same goes for your husband.
Tell him to think of the old Fram oil filter commercial:

"You can pay me now, or you can pay me later."

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to send me e-mail
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