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How did you scold this bird?

You can scold a dogs. You scold cats You don't scold a bird because they understand scolding. http://www3.upatsix.com/liz/articles/drama.html

That site has some very interesting stuff. What are people's thoughts on shouldering, as described here:
http://www3.upatsix.com/liz/articles/nurturing.html

My question is: does the rationale about shoulders being above eye level apply to parrots who are not above eye level on one's shoulder, like budgies, cockatiels, and love birds? Is eye height the critical thing, or should shoulders generally be off-limits, regardless of the size of the parrot?
And if shoulders should be off-limits for small parrots, what activities are mutually rewarding for bird and owner when the parrot is on your hand? Just practising words, offering rewards, and giving head scratches gets a little tedious after a while...
Paul
While I agree scolding doesn't do much good that certainly doesn't mean that large parrots don't realize when they've broken ... evil ;-) I've never had a bit of luck scolding cats either. Dogs respond fairly well, usually better than kids.

When Billy is on top of his cage, I pull the cage away from the window, when I remember, because he can reach the valance. He sneaks a pull on the fabric and dislodges it from the frame. It's an easy fix with a flat card to tuck it all back in unless it's chewed beyond recognition. He knows it's not allowed, but will do it anyway. If I catch him at it, just a look starts him reprimanding himself. He grumbles this reprimand in a whisper as though he is trying to memorize it for the school play. Within minutes, he'd do it again if given the chance. Smart but doing mischief is so irresistible.

Sincerely,
Joanne
If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

http://www.jobird.com
Wonders of Western Washington Video collection:
http://www.jobird.com/private/wondersindex.htm
You can scold a dogs. You scold cats You ... since I've never said that to her I know better.

While I agree scolding doesn't do much good that certainly doesn't mean that large parrots don't realize when they've broken ... punishment to their behavior. I have one B&G macaw that pull keys off of computer keyboards just for fun.

He needs his own keyboard. He's just trying to help. He sees you doing it so he wants to do it too.
But
when he does it and sees me, without me even having seen the keyboard, he'll fly to his cage and ... the fun was worth the punishment. I know he doesn't like being locked in his cage separated from his mate.

Well, you go into a different room when you have been bad and pounded all those little button things for a while.
Just because a bird knows it's breaking rules doesn't necessarily stop them. I think they're just evil ;-)

Just trying to help.
I've never had a bit of luck scolding cats either. Dogs respond fairly well, usually better than kids.

Cats don't herd well either.
James F. Mayer
President
J F M Electronic Systems, Inc. Surge Protection for Access Control E-Mail (Email Removed)
Web Page http://home.netcom.com/~jfma /
EarthLink Revolves Around You.
While I agree scolding doesn't do much good that certainly ... that pull keys off of computer keyboards just for fun.

He needs his own keyboard. He's just trying to help. He sees you doing it so he wants to do it too.

I got a good laugh from that story.
My 'tiel sometimes walks on the keyboard and to him my fingers are evil creatures and he tries to run them off. I usually don't have him out when I'm using the computer. He gets mad when I hide the mouse becuase he wants to chew on the mouse cable.
We recently bought a 1 1/2 year old quaker. She has quite quickly attached herself to my wife. From everything ... best we can. Any thoughts?? Regards, Dann blogging athttp://web.newsguy.com/dainbramage/blog.htm Freedom works; each and every time it is tried.Hi Dann

I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with your Quaker. I socialize/re-socialize birds and would be happy to try to help you out. First of all, please do not loudly scold or snap your bird when he bites. Loud makes him loud, mad and more aggressive. The quick snapping has killed many a bird because it is the same thing as shaken baby syndrome.
I would like to invite you to join the Quaker Parakeet Society E-mail list at (Email Removed) There are many seasoned Quaker Slaves on their that you will feel at home right away., You may feel free to write to our QPS-RAPP, Chairman, who will assign a mentor to help you with your baby. We do not know what he went through in his previous home and men may have been a stress in is life. This will take time and we will help. Drop and E-mal to Joy Thompson at (Email Removed) and Ishe will get back to you in light-speed time. We are here to help and do all that we can to make a happy quaker family.
Jan
On 11 Sep 2007, Alex Clayton said the following in
Thanks much. At least we know how to read all ... while at the same time offering me some handling time.

I tamed a wild Blue Crown Conure once many years ago. He was we don't know how old when we ... started getting on my hand. I would feed him with the other. In a few weeks the gloves came off.


Thanks to Alex and everyone else for responding.
Things have changed just a bit here. We happened upon another bird owner that was interested in owning a Quaker; female, lives alone. Very much the same condition that our Quaker was in before we bought her.

After a bit of discussion, we decided that it might be a better situation for her if she went to this lady.
The feedback we received was that the first afternoon at her new home was a bit amusing. The Quaker went up on top of her cage and refused to come down.
Rather than forcing the issue, her new owner decided to sit on the floor and play "catch" with her Cockatoo. "Catch" being a game involving rolling a ball back and forth.
After about 15 minutes, the Quaker decided that she wanted to play as well.
There is also a Great Dane in the house. The 'Too loves to ride around on the Dane's back. Apparently the Dane likes this game as well.

When the 'Too went off to do something else, the Quaker decided that she wanted a ride as well.
The entire menagerie (dane, 'too, quaker, and hairless ape) are having a great time together.
Alex's glove advice won't go to waste. We own a mating pair of Conures, one of which is also very aggressive towards men in general. Being part of a mating pair, we have generally thought it best to let them be.

One thing that I have been trying with her is peanut butter. She loves it. So I put a little bit on my finger so she can have a snack. The general idea being that she will become conditioned to the idea that not biting my finger(s) results in something good.
Thanks to Jan for the listserv information. We still want to own a Quaker and I'm sure that list will be helpful.

Regards,
Dann
blogging at http://web.newsguy.com/dainbramage/blog.htm

Freedom works; each and every time it is tried.
I tamed a wild Blue Crown Conure once many years ... the other. In a few weeks the gloves came off.

Thanks to Alex and everyone else for responding. Things have changed just a bit here. We happened ... sure that list will be helpful. Regards, Dann blogging athttp://web.newsguy.com/dainbramage/blog.htm Freedom works; each and every time it is tried.a

Dann
While I am glad that this bird has found a good home, I am sorry that you gave up on him so easily. In this case it was probably for the best for both of you. Having said that, I recommend that you investigate the very changeable and sometimes self-righteous nature of a Quaker. They are not for everybody and certainly not the best choice for a first bird, if you aren't prepared to take a few nips and deal with them on a more intellectual than masterful level. Please join the QP list and ask questions, before getting a Quaker, so that yet another bird does not have to be re-homed. It is disappointing to you and devastating for the bird. QPS is always here to help. Jan
Thanks to Alex and everyone else for responding. Things have changed just a bit here. We happened upon another bird ... listserv information. We still want to own a Quaker and I'm sure that list will be helpful. Regards, Dann

Glad it worked out so well, and it sounds like the bird is in a GREAT new home where it will have a very good life.Quakers make a great pet, and are easy to deal with, IF, and this is the big IF, you get one well socialized to begin with. With any of the Parrots if they are hand fed the right way from a very early age they love people and bond easily with them. If not, it can be anywhere from a slightly difficult, to all but impossible situation, depending on the age of the bird, and just how it was raised. If you decide to get another one find a young well tamed, hand fed bird, and you will find it a great joy.

When they are raised right by breeders who know what they are doing, it will be obvious as soon as you handle it. They like attention from humans. There will always be a slight adjustment when you first bring them to a new home, but they get over it very fast. Many of them learn to talk quite well too, and they are a VERY hardy bird. This is why several states has banned their sale. Wild flocks of them are able to live even in very cold climates and become pests that have to be dealt with.
As a couple of us have mentioned reading the books by "experts" is often good entertainment, but don't take everything they say as gospel. From what I have experienced many of them, often don't have a clue what they are talking about, and are FAR too impressed with themselves. Enjoy the birds, and let us know when you find a Quaker to make a good friend with!!

Mandatory drug screens are great. I think all people who ask for welfare should have to pass one.
Thanks to Alex and everyone else for responding. Things have ... I'm sure that list will be helpful. Regards, Dann

Glad it worked out so well, and it sounds like the bird is in a GREAT new home where it ... with!! Mandatory drug screens are great. I think all people who ask for welfare should have to pass one.

Alex - I have to agree that most behaviorists books and lectures are "full of sound and fury, signifying nothing"; because every bird is and individual and unless and until your have worked with a particular species extensively, you cannot generalize on corrective measures for aberrant behavior. Having said, that and having worked "in the trenches" with many Quakers, I can tell you that they are willful and intelligent little birds and somethings you are just better off ignoring (picking your battles, so to speak).
I do take exception to your notion that once feral, now evolved to wild, Quakers have become pests. It is true that more patience and work must be expended to socialize them to a human environment; but, it can and is being done, not only by myself but; many others who rescue babies from nest tear-downs and fall downs. The misconception that they are pests, in the wild, comes from their South American homeland, where they were blamed for crop failures and crop destruction. The European Starling, is a bigger bane to a grain crop than a flock of Quakers. They really aren't grain eaters, if they have other fair available, life berries and vegetables.

A good read and an avenue to understand the wild Quaker Population, would be Parrots In the City. It can be purchased from the Quaker Parakeet Society Website.
Jan s.
www.birdcagesgalore.com
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