We recently bought a 1 1/2 year old quaker. She has quite quickly attached herself to my wife. From everything I've read, this is reasonably normal quaker behavior.
However, she is very aggressive towards me and our sons (19+ y.o.). Lots of snapping beaks..more than a little bloodshed on our part. And despite the frequent use of treats (primarily by me), this behavior has gotten worse rather than better.
We've been working in a sort of tag team to try and get her socialized with more than one person. Typically we do this on neutral ground. (i.e. away from her cage.)
We figured out that there were some elevation issues as she is much more aggressive when she is above us. We we minimize those issues as best we can.
Any thoughts??

Regards,
Dann
blogging at http://web.newsguy.com/dainbramage/blog.htm

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We recently bought a 1 1/2 year old quaker. She has quite quickly attached herself to my wife. From everything ... aggressive when she is above us. We we minimize those issues as best we can. Any thoughts?? Regards, Dann

Sounds like you are doing all the right things. It may not happen as quickly as you would like, but time and patience is the answer. Don't overwork her. Short sessions several times a day is best in my opinion. Keep it fun for you all. Quakers can be very verbal. Talk to her in between sessions to include her in the family group even from another room. As long as you are all participating she should come to trust you all. Quakers do have an extremely hard bite, in my opinion. The worst thing that could happen is you begin to pull away from her because she is biting. Soon this turns into her isolation and the program is lost.

Good luck.

Sincerely,
Joanne
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On 09 Sep 2007, Joanne said the following in
We recently bought a 1 1/2 year old quaker. She ... us. We we minimize those issues as best we can.

Sounds like you are doing all the right things. It may not happen as quickly as you would like, but ... away from her because she is biting. Soon this turns into her isolation and the program is lost. Good luck.

Thanks much. At least we know how to read all the right books and magazines. (grin)
We had another session tonight that went all right. I've been using a bath towel to pick her up. We play around a bit with it. The towel is an excellent way to keep her from getting at my fingers while at the same time offering me some handling time.
Curiously, we put her in her cage during dinner and she got sort of sullen and didn't want to come back out afterwards. She had been out for about 3 hours at that point so I think she was just ready for some down time.
Again, thanks for your thoughts. We'll have to see how it goes.

Regards,
Dann
blogging at http://web.newsguy.com/dainbramage/blog.htm

Freedom works; each and every time it is tried.
Thanks much. At least we know how to read all the right books and magazines. (grin) We had another session ... she was just ready for some down time. Again, thanks for your thoughts. We'll have to see how it goes.[/nq]I tamed a wild Blue Crown Conure once many years ago. He was we don't know how old when we got him, had spent many years ignored, living in a cage outside with another bird. He would draw blood fast on anyone who offered him the chance. The "experts" say not to, but I used gloves. I used a pair of Deer skin gloves, they fit tight, and are easy to wear. I would slowly offer him my finger, he would attack it and bite hell out of it, but of course it had no effect.

I kept this up for a while and after a few days he started getting on my hand. I would feed him with the other. In a few weeks the gloves came off. Then when he would nip, not the attacking bites, a scolding would stop it. He accepted me but no one else. Then when the kids grew and left we let him grow his wings. He soon became a very loving pet to my wife too when he could fly around. Even decided he liked the first Dog (Min-Pin). Used to feed her.

Now this may not work, for you, but it sure worked for us.

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Thanks much. At least we know how to read all ... for your thoughts. We'll have to see how it goes.

I tamed a wild Blue Crown Conure once many years ago. He was we don't know how old when we ... first Dog (Min-Pin). Used to feed her. Now this may not work, for you, but it sure worked for us.

How did you scold this bird?
How did you scold this bird?

A loud NO BITE, and a quick shake to throw him off balance. He soon got the idea of how hard he could work a finger with his beak. When you watch birds interact with each other they do the same thing. If one preens too hard, the other yells. It takes them a while to figure out your hand is not as tough as their beak.
As I said this was NOT for the attacking type bites, like if he was scared. For exams and clips I still used those gloves, to gently get him in a towel. That damn beak of theirs is like an ice pick. Many people found it out the hard way when they did not heed our warning to not offer him a finger while he stood their talking to them.

"Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks."
(Lazarus Long)
How did you scold this bird?You can scold a dogs.

You scold cats
You don't scold a bird because they understand scolding. http://www3.upatsix.com/liz/articles/drama.html
I'd suggest you get a few books on parrot be behavior such as A Guide To A Well Behaved Parrot by Mattie Sue Athan
Many years ago when I first got my AG she was on the top of her cage. After awhile it got on my nervous and shouted at her to :Be Quiet." The result being that many times now when she is going through a squawking bout she'll yell "Be Quiet." Occasionally she'll substitute "Shut Up" which I think she picked up when I left at my parent's apartment for a few days. Mother to this day claims to this day to have yelled at her but since I've never said that to her I know better.

How did you scold this bird?

You can scold a dogs. You scold cats You don't scold a bird because they understand scolding. http://www3.upatsix.com/liz/articles/drama.html I'd suggest ... claims to this day to have yelled at her but since I've never said that to her I know better.

While I agree scolding doesn't do much good that certainly doesn't mean that large parrots don't realize when they've broken rules and that they don't relate various forms of punishment to their behavior. I have one B&G macaw that pull keys off of computer keyboards just for fun. But when he does it and sees me, without me even having seen the keyboard, he'll fly to his cage and pull the door closed behind him. He knows that's where he's going to be for the rest of the day and it's like he's telling me the fun was worth the punishment. I know he doesn't like being locked in his cage separated from his mate.
Just because a bird knows it's breaking rules doesn't necessarily stop them. I think they're just evil ;-)
I've never had a bit of luck scolding cats either. Dogs respond fairly well, usually better than kids.
While I agree scolding doesn't do much good that certainly doesn't mean that large parrots don't realize when they've broken ... evil ;-) I've never had a bit of luck scolding cats either. Dogs respond fairly well, usually better than kids.

LOL, I have yet to see a cat that cared in the least what they were being told, unless it was feeding time.
Our Macaw does know the term "NO" very well. If he is doing something, or about to do something not allowed he will often respond to simple scolding and stop. He does often repeat it now which is funny as hell. Often if the wife is cooking or such and can't deal with him, when she see's him climbing down will yell at him "you get back up there". He does. He also will stand there and say "you get back up there, NO!" Then when we laugh he will laugh. He will normally get back up on his cage and stand though so it works, he certainly understands.
He also has figured out the Dogs react to his "alarm" that means someone is here. He will often do it for no reason other than to watch them both jump on the chair to look outside and bark. Then he tells them to "shut up" and laughs. I doubt the Dogs will ever figure out that he is having fun with them.

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