I have 1.5 yr old Timneh African Grey who is sweet and not at all skiddish. The vacuum or any loud noise doesn't bother her. I have rearranged the perches and toys in her cage with no problem. I just bought a Thermo-Perch and she is scared to death of it. The only other thing I have put in her cage that she didn't like was the color gray also the Thermo-Perch is gray). If it's the color, I'd like to paint it with Krylon Fusion which is supposed to be the best for plastic. Does anyone know if it's safe? If she does chip it will it hurt her if ingested? Could the cable on the Thermo-Perch make her think it's a snake? Help!!
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Parrots in general, (and IMO Greys especially), can be quite reluctant in regards to change in their immediate environment. Your bird is telling you something; it might pay to listen.
Why do you think your bird needs a heated perch? If your bird seems to be too cold, simply warm the room. That will warm the BIRD, and not just its feet. Not a lot of heated perches out in the wild that don't include a heated environment. Marketing hype don't you just love it!
With time, you might be able to force the change in environment on the bird, or you may simply make it a neurotic mess. It's your bird and your choice, but why try to force something on the bird that it obviously doesn't want, and I can't see for the life of me that it would need.
There are several things that my CAG will not allow in his cage without going ballistic, even though he will play with some of the same objects elsewhere. Solution I don't put them in his cage.

Bob
Thanks Bob. Because of financial reasons we keep the house at about 63 degrees. Is that OK for a TAG?
kevin
Thanks Bob. Because of financial reasons we keep the house at about 63 degrees. Is that OK for a TAG? kevin

Kevin,
As a general rule, if you are comfortable, your birds should be okay. There are obviously exceptions, and Greys may be one of these, since they normally come from a warm, dry environment. Observe the bird, and if it doesn't appear to be cold, it's probably okay.
During the winter, we also normally keep our home a bit cool as you do more because we are comfortable cooler, than for finances, but the outcome is the same. We have a dedicated bird room, and what we normally do in the winter is simply place one of those radiator-style space heaters in the bird room. They are pretty safe, since their surface temperature doesn't get very hot, and there is not a glowing coil that would present a fire hazard like some other space heaters.

Those cords aren't shielded, but I've used a very small piece of PVC tubing (can be bent with a heat gun) to protect the cord. We've never had any sort of accident from one of these space heaters, nor have we ever experienced a leak from the "radiator coils" in the twenty or so years we've been doing this supposedly a non-toxic oil, anyway. Ours has a setting for either 750 watts or 1500 watts, as well as a fairly accurate thermostat, so it only runs when needed.

We've not noticed an appreciable increase in the electric bill while using the heater. and the bird room stays warm, while the rest of the house can be as cool as we desire. If you have a single bird, there are radiant heat panels that are thin, and can be placed on the wall near the cage (and can be painted wall-color if so desired and dray VERY little power), if you feel additional heating is needed.
Also, these type radiator-style of heaters can be found about anywhere I think ours came from Wally World, and was less expensive than the prices I've seen posted for the thermo-perch.
Just my take on things. I'm sure that some birds will appreciate the thermo-perch, but IMO, CAGS can be really particular about their immediate environment. One of the things my CAG is deathly afraid of IN his cage are those semi-rigid, colored rope perches. He has one formed into an arch on the top of his cage that he loves to play on, and another on a play gym that he seems to delight in using. But just try putting it in his cage and he cowers in the opposite corner of his cage, alternating between screaming like someone being raped, and shaking and "growling" totally psyched out! Go figure. He's obvisously very stressed, and I don't want to do that to my bird.

My CAG is much older than your Timneh, and is more sure of himself than he was at the age of your Tiimneh, but there are still things that he is either afraid of, or simply will not allow, regardless of how I try to present them.I realize that you've spent a fair bit of money on the perch (trying to do what you thought best for the bird), and you "might" be able to use it in another setting, such as a play gym. You've already said the bird is fearful of the color gray, so that may be a problem, but I'd guess that "snaky-looking" wire may also be a part of the problem.. Don't feel bad, most of us here have made purchases that ultimately were not allowed to be used by our birds.

Most of my birds love the television, but I have an M2 that hates it, and screams her head off until the 'tube is removed from the room (whether it is on or not). It's another story in the den, where she can stand in front of it for hours, watching it and trying to mimic its sounds.
I don't know about the toxicity of Krylon if your Timneh is a perch-chewer. Epoxy paints should be pretty safe once cured they are pretty inert (I would think acrylics might be even better). The thermo-perch manufacturer's hype isn't totally incorrect. The differences in size along its length is probably good for the bird's feet. I try to use natural branches that vary in size. If you can find Manzanita that varies in size, and isn't that horribly slick variant, I've found it works pretty well.

Other narural woods that aren't listed as toxic also work well. I personally try to avoid those with a very heavy bark, but the bird will likely peel the bark if it isn't to his liking, anyway. Greys can be a bit clumsy, and a perch with some texture seems to be of benefit. I've always tried to avoid simple round perches.
Bob
Thanks Bob. Because of financial reasons we keep the house at about 63 degrees. Is that OK for a TAG?

Believe me from first hand experience your TAG can tolerate temperatures much lower than 63.
Thanks Bob. Because of financial reasons we keep the house at about 63 degrees. Is that OK for a TAG? kevin

Kevin, As a general rule, if you are comfortable, your birds should be okay. There are obviously exceptions, and Greys ... come from a warm, dry environment. Observe the bird, and if it doesn't appear to be cold, it's probably okay.

I've had my AG ten years and I keep the thermostat down as far as it can go. No problems. Feathers and down are great insulators.
Believe me from first hand experience your TAG can tolerate temperatures much lower than 63.

There are times that my CAG seems to prefer cold, and it doesn't seem to bother him at all.He rarely enjoys bathing, but AT TIMES, if he sees me walking around in a robe or partially dressed he MAY start hollering "SHOWER, Bob". Yep, it means that he wants a shower (but only when HE wants it).. He'll stand on the shower door until I'm finished (enjoying the echo in the stall while he "sings"), and then get on my hand and into the stream he goes. If the shower is anywhere near comfortable for a human, he will quickly calm down and stare at me.

Once I turn the hot fully off, so the water is unbearable to me, he has a wild old time. Dunno' how long he'd do this, as he is still leaning towards the stream long after my arm has tired out. He will allow a light toweling, but hates the blow dryer. Back in the bird room, the now-drenched bird begins the preening process, and at no time does he shiver or stand ruffled as though he's cold (and the bird room is only around 65-70 degrees).
If you do bathe your birds this way, I'd recommend keeping their nails trimmed, and teaching them to stand on your fingers so you can grip their toes while they have their wiild time. I learned that the hard way with our M2, that also likes to bathe this way. Arm looked like a hemorrhaging pincushion long before the bird was through bathing. You don't want to let them fall while doing this. A sopping wet (heavy) bird falling several feet onto hard tiles could easily injure its keel, or worse. Wet wings are fairly useless in the confines of most showers, too, except for slapping you in the face whilst they are having their fun.
Bob
Believe me from first hand experience your TAG can tolerate temperatures much lower than 63.

There are times that my CAG seems to prefer cold, and it doesn't seem to bother him at all. He ... confines of most showers, too, except for slapping you in the face whilst they are having their fun. Bob

Why not buy a shower perch? They are about twenty dollars and you won't have bleeding arms any more.
Why not buy a shower perch? They are about twenty dollars and you won't have bleeding arms any more.

Got one. So far, none of the birds that like to bathe in the shower will even get on it. The shower door is fine, in one case the pipe to the shower head is an okay perch, but for the most part they want to be on the human, and NOT on the shower perch. The CAG won't come into the shower if the shower perch is on the wall. Dunno' if it's a security thing or what, just the way it is.
Bob
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