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Thanks a lot Joanne. The picture I posted is of the corner of the cage, believe me its quite big. I made sure it doesn't have any sharp edges and there are more perches all over the cage. I have also put up a natural branch.
The cage also contains a wooden box (the laid the eggs in there) and there is sufficient shade. The eating area is in different part of the cage. The cage covers my entire window area with plenty of viewing area and fresh air. At times I feel really sad for caging them but they are unfriendly at the momen, perhaps I will leave them free in my house once I gain their confidence.
The chap who sold it to me had about 20-30 of them crammed up in a cage smaller than mine. I take solace in the fact that mine have a much bigger place all for themselves.
I will be posting more pictures of the birds with a better view of the cage shortly.
Thanks again
Thanks for the info Louis, really appreciate it. I'm just wondering what to do with the eggs as none have hatched. Also, am confused about both of them being females, would a female mount a female?

Humans aren't the only critters on earth which engage in homosexual relationships. As stated before, if a male-female relationship isn't available they'll take what they can get.
Thanks for the info Louis, really appreciate it. I'm just ... of them being females, would a female mount a female?

Humans aren't the only critters on earth which engage in homosexual relationships. As stated before, if a male-female relationship isn't available they'll take what they can get.

Yep. When I was working at Bird Gardens we had a pair of Dusky Lorikeets for sale. One was a DNA sexed female, and the other we were told was a male. This pair displayed a lot of sexual behaviors, trying to nest under the newspaper, mating, mate/nest area defence, etc. The 'male' displayed sterotypical male behavoirs as it was the more aggressive of the pair defending the cage (made them REALLY fun to clean and feed, Yikes!) and was the 'top' for mating.
Eventually one of the local breeders became interested in the pair, as she specialized in lorikeets. We told her that we would sell them, but to be sure we decided to have the 'male' DNA sexed.
Turned out that we had a pair of females.
I think the breeder ended up buy both of them any ways, and set them up with two different males.
Later, when I worked for a summer at Oregon Zoo's lorikeet exhibit there was an ornate lorikeet who was in love with my brown shoes. I'd look down there he was... doing something very nasty to my shoes. Love knows no boundries, apparently.
Gloria
Thanks Gloria, that sure was an eye opener Emotion: smile
Gald you mentioned in this post that there is a box in the cage that the bird(s) are laying the eggs in. You absolutely need to remove the box. That's the main reason for the eggs.
Dave