1 2 3 4 5 6 7
A different sound is good for the chute, especially if a change in direction is involved and you don't want ... simplicity is my mantra, I use a "tunnel" command, but use my "go go go" if the path is straight.

I discovered the hard way - during a run that otherwise might have stayed clean - that "go, go, go" when Spenser's in the tunnel may sound to him like "no, no, no". He popped right back out - WAY after I thought he passed the committment point! It was a U-shaped tunnel that looped the course back where you entered so my voice wasn't moving to the other end. It probably would have worked better on a straight shot but only if my voice was moving along with or ahead of him.
And when he realizes he makes a mistake on the course (or in this case, when I do) he shuts down and I have to work to get him back up again. He HATES to be wrong. My brother, the coach, said that he has his little hockey players practice mistakes. So we've started doing that with Spenser. I think it's helping - he recovers most of the time now.
How many times have you given the wrong names to obstacles yet Spencer has gone the right way? Stop worrying about names and commands - refine your body language.

Most of the time when I give the wrong name, Spenser still does it right. So I'm guessing that my body language trumps whatever he hears. Except that I know that when I say "turn" he makes a sharp turn toward my voice. (I don't even know how I taught him that - I just started doing it and he understood.) So I have to be sure that I'm in the right position when I use "turn".
I do have a different word for each obstacle. I started with them all different and I don't know how much discrimination Spenser does but I figure it can't hurt. Especially since he reacts first to body language. I do think it helps in Gamblers (haven't ever done Snooker). My gut feeling is that it will help down the line as we move to more and more distance - although he has never been a Velcro dog.
Our instructor from last night's class uses "hup" for all jumps. Is it perhaps an obedience thing? Brand new instructor and class today - I have high hopes for a lot of help.
Herding people - what terms are used for right and left turns? DH is thinking of trying to teach Gee and Haw to Sassy. Are there better words?
~~Judy
Spenser - Carbor Talk of the Town, NA
Sassy - Can CH Carbor Back Talk
Tunnelers does tend to make one aware of the necessity of DIRECTIONALS.

DH ran a tunnelers course with Sassy. She did just what I would have expected - handled it okay but halfway through just stopped and lifted her head up and stared at him like "You have got to be kidding!". And she was done.
I did a Touch N Go with Spenser last summer and he did about six extra tunnels in that - including the dummy one three times. By the time we got to the last three tunnels and out he gave me that same look. He did finish but, of course, it didn't matter to his score.

Even for our Earth Dogs, there seems to be a limit on the number of Tunnels!

The problem may be that we have had no way of practicing it - just never enough tunnels around to make even an abbreviated course. The new class we're taking does do an occasional tunnelers setup so maybe we'll give it a try again this fall. Too late now for our July NADAC.
~~Judy
Spenser - Carbor Talk of the Town, NA
Sassy - Can CH Carbor Back Talk
Why? How often do you see an obstacle discrimination challenge involving a teeter and dogwalk?

I've never seen it in either USDAA or NADAC - BUT it doesn't matter as far as wanting to help my dogs distinguish between them with a verbal; it's a safety issue.
A dog who runs up a teeter thinking it's the dogwalk is not a good thing.

Now, what I HAVE seen in NADAC- and it's caused serious problems with many dogs every time I've seen it- is course design which inadvertently places the teeter entry close to where the dogwalk was on the previous day. I also see higher levels of dw/teeter confusion in Touch and Go classes, where the obstacles are taken more than once.
As to safety, I've never seen a dog approach a teeter as if it was a dogwalk,

NEVER?? Are you serious? You've never seen a dog run up a teeter and launch?
Many a Master's gamble will make you truly appreciate the additional assistance of obstacle names.

It's highly unlikely I'll ever do one. I DO use obstacle names in NADAC Elite Gamblers- in which Morag routinely nails the distance handling- but they aren't a major part of how we get them.
I definitely want the teeter and dogwalk to sound different.

Why? How often do you see an obstacle discrimination challenge involving a teeter and dogwalk? You wrote that you have and, not to be overly argumentative, but I'd like to see such a course design.

I'm not sure I have one on the computer, but yes, I've seen them several times. Not right next to each other and parallel of course, like a tunnel under a dogwalk, but I have had them with bases about 10 feet apart (this is legal in AKC) sprayed out like hands on a clock say the dogwalk being at 12:00 and the teeter being at 2:00 in angle. It's a perfectly legitimate challenge in AKC.
As to safety, I've never seen a dog approach a teeter as if it was a dogwalk, but that may ... base of the teeter must be wider than the plank. I'm not sure if I really believe in that one.

I've seen lots and lots of dogs approach the teeter as if it were a dogwalk, especially in NADAC where there are no slats on the DW. I've also seen it in trials where the dogwalk is in one spot on the first day, and the teeter in that same spot the next. The result is a truly ugly flyoff, with the dog flailing midair then crashing down. Not something I want to have happen.
Heh. I never use "no" with the dogs, and "Go!" is a definite directional command. So "go-go-go" would act for my dogs like it did for Matt..
As to safety, I've never seen a dog approach a teeter as if it was a dogwalk,

NEVER?? Are you serious? You've never seen a dog run up a teeter and launch?

speaking of teeters and dogwalks, Franklin continues to make progress on the dogwalk. He still thinks it's basically evil, but is willing to do it. He does the a-frame a little fast for my taste at this point, but I guess that's ultimately a good thing.
Now I'm just waiting for the bugs to go away so we can start working in the yard - it's been a rough spring!
Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com /
Our instructor from last night's class uses "hup" for all jumps. Is it perhaps an obedience thing?

Going off on a tangent (so what else is new?):
As I understand the etymology of "hup", it was originally a term used in circus work - it's used by acrobats, trapeze artists, etc., as well as by animal trainers - and possibly in advanced riding work. IIRC, it's a corruption of the French "houppe" and/or the German "hopfen".

As far as dogs are concerned, I've no idea if it's common in obedience, but I think it's fairly common among trick trainers.
Heh. I never use "no" with the dogs, and "Go!" is a definite directional command. So "go-go-go" would act for my dogs like it did for Matt..

My ultimate goal is to keep "No" for those Voice Of God times. Mostly I use "eh-eh" for the anytime stuff. I am trying very hard not to use "no" on the agility course but it happens - usually when he's headed totally off course and getting unfocused. After a repeated "here" doesn't work. (Although he IS getting better.)
What was really frustrating about this tunnel was that it was a trap entrance - and we had done it right and I was really excited about that. Then to have him pop back out because of MY error was just plain awful!
~~Judy
Spenser - Carbor Talk of the Town, NA
Sassy - Can CH Carbor Back Talk
Show more