I won't say where I was or who the judge is, though yes, I may (or may not) answer privately if asked depends on who does the asking.

I will say that these are the kinds of courses I do NOT like, especially for big dogs. I was especially astounded by the ugliness at the chute for the Open Std course, which I didn't run myself. FWIW, Viva did an excellent job of getting through these though she didn't Q. On the Jumpers course she slipped a weave in the middle because they weren't properly anchored and started whipping back and forth. In the Standard course I mis-timed a cue and she dropped the triple.

We did have some truly lovely courses by the other judge. Cala finished her NAJ so that was nice.

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@attbi s51:
I won't say where I was or who the judge is, though yes, I may (or may not) answer privately if asked depends on who does the asking.

Over on Retriever Training Forum, this gets called "getting run over by the Internet Bus." It usually starts with a hypothetical "What Would You Do in These Circumstances," posted by someone who was at a weekend trial... and the regulars know perfectly well which trial and who the judge was.
For the most part, I find the Internet Bus exercises a very helpful way to participate in fine, picky definitions of the rules, and many people walk away from them making quiet notes in their Little Black Books O'Judges.
I really, really don't like that open course. I do like thinking about what I could have done about it. With a dog who'll stay in the weaves, I suppose I'd get over to the Jump 4 and try what amounted to a front cross to force that chute entry... I really don't think I could crank Storm around that hard with her still on my left. The trap coming out of the chute is almost as bad.
The Internet Bus has put me off of wanting to judge any time soon, though. There are so very many ways to screw up and I don't need tire tracks on my head.

Kate
and Storm the FCR
I will say that these are the kinds of courses I do NOT like, especially for big dogs. I was especially astounded by the ugliness at the chute for the Open Std course, which I didn't run myself.

I don't blame you on this one. I'm in Open Standard. And I try to look at each course as a challenge first and foremost. I would NOT like to have been faced with that course. Not only around the chute, the course is just all twists and jerks. There's no flow. I think my dogs would have trouble with the footing - and they're jumping 12 inch!
Now the ExJWW course, I would love to run. I'm trying to figure out how I can scrape up enough jumps to set it up in the yard. At the very least, I'm setting up that serpentine at the end.
The Ex standard course looks doable. I've never encountered the X pattern of the 3-4-5-6 jumps. I think we're going to play with that a little also.
~~Judy
When life gives you lemons, ask for tequila and salt.
The Internet Bus has put me off of wanting to judge any time soon, though. There are so very many ways to screw up and I don't need tire tracks on my head.

A few friends are now turning down judging opportunities. After the other weekend, I may do the same. In my case, though, some of the verbage may be true - my "interesting" courses were probably too difficult, but I wish the players would tell me to my face.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
A few friends are now turning down judging opportunities. After the other weekend, I may do the same. In my ... true - my "interesting" courses were probably too difficult, but I wish the players would tell me to my face.

Ah, but what is "too difficult" really? This past weekend, Wylie and I crashed and burned through courses that were too difficult for us. Would I have gone up to tell the judge that? No, because they were too difficult based upon our level of training. I did see experienced dogs have difficulties, but other dogs were successful, so it couldn't have been too difficult for those dogs.
Now, if you're hearing feedback through the "grapevine" it is probably stinging. If there is any validity to the criticism, take it into account, and move on.
FWIW, I appreciate a tricky sequence that challenges me, and whether I Q or not, I count successes by whether I can succeed in that challenge. What I don't like to see are courses that don't flow, like the ones Robin posted, where you are jerking your dog all over. I also don't like courses with too much flow, like this past weekend, where there are long stretches of jumps - but that's because my dog is faster than I am, and we haven't perfected sends ahead, so we incur refusals. That, however, is a training issue, and I'd certainly not complain about the courses (though I was heard to grumble this weekend, what is this, NADAC?) when really what I have to complain about is my own failure to train my dog.
Christy
Now the ExJWW course, I would love to run. I'm trying to figure out how I can scrape up enough jumps to set it up in the yard. At the very least,I'm setting up that serpentine at the end.

I don't like the sequence from the weaves to #10 - it looks like it would be very hard on the dog to get on the right lead from #8 to #9. You could FC at the weaves then again after #7, but I can't imagine doing that with my dog and not losing him to an off course. I honestly can't see a viable way of doing that sequence efficiently - I would probably have to RC at #7 and again at #8, turning him way wide for #9. Ick.
The Ex standard course looks doable. I've never encountered the X pattern of the 3-4-5-6 jumps. I think we're going to play with that a littlealso.

That reminds me of a course I ran once, a while back. I vowed I'd never run under that judge again, and these courses look similar, so I have to wonder if its the same judge, or just two with course designs that I simply don't care for...
Christy
The Internet Bus has put me off of wanting to ... up and I don't need tire tracks on my head.

A few friends are now turning down judging opportunities. After the other weekend, I may do the same. In my ... true - my "interesting" courses were probably too difficult, but I wish the players would tell me to my face.

Trust me, that judge would have to have been deaf to not hear some of our comments. And honestly, it's something that I think those who choose to judge need to expect. No matter what you do, some people are going to strongly dislike and complain about your courses. You just have to accept it. But AKC is very judge-oriented. Judges are given pretty wide parameters within which to work you must obey the rules and add in the challenges appropriate to the level, and after that you're free to design and have your own style. But there are certain judges that have a real knack of designing fast, flowing courses that are far from easy but are fun to run. and to give equal time, I'll list some of my favorites:

Rhonda Crane
Greg Beck
Karen Paulukaitis
Don Farage
Jean Munger
Rachel Long
All of these judges do a good job of making a course big, long-strided dogs can do well on, but courses that do make you think!
Huh. I was thinking of a RC at 7, the a blind cross between 8 and 9, then running the dog on left to probably a RC at 11 and back again. Or a send/call back at 8 and 9 and dog on right until after 11.

I admit, there are a lot of side changes through that sequence. Probably a smaller dog, shorter strides, closer-working would make it easier. I'd still like to do some playing with it and figure it out.

Then you get to show the distance work at the end with the serpentine.

~~Judy
For the most part, I find the Internet Bus exercises a very helpful way to participate in fine, picky definitions of the rules, and many people walk away from them making quiet notes in their Little Black Books O'Judges.

We have a small dobe list that will flat out name and discuss judges. We feel that as big dog owners we have the right to do this and we will. We talk about courses we love, and courses we hate, and some in between. It's more than a matter of not liking it, it's a matter of the physical stresses put on the dog yanking them continuously back and forth like a yo-yo.
I really, really don't like that open course. I do like thinking about what I could have done about it. ... around that hard with her still on my left. The trap coming out of the chute is almost as bad.

That was generally the safest thing to do, but keep in mind that also in that corner was a gate. So dogs coming over 4 had a tight corner, an open gate, and the double to look at. The chute really was recessed behind the double and the dog had to thread past the double to get to it. No dog fell for the trap after the chute however.
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