Greetings, all:
I'm sure this problem comes up quite a bit and I did search deja.com and got some info from previous posts to this group about Red Leg.

I have an albino frog which, a few days ago, developed signs of Red Leg, at least as far as the websites listed it. But, the frog looked bloated and then his right upper leg showed the redness. I cleaned out the tank and isolated the frog from the other two I have and have begun treatment with Triple Sulfa and tetracycline. Unfortunately, the isolation tank spilled into the main tank ( I only have one heater so I floated the smaller tank in the larger ) so I'm just treating the whole thing now.
After about ten or eleven hours after the first treatment, the redness in the frog's leg decreased but his skin looks like it is sloughing off in patches and I actually saw the frog vomit and currently, the frog is trying to get out of the tank. The other two frogs seem totally uneffected and continue as they have been in terms of activity.
I'm a bit confused now. Nowhere did I see the vomiting and such described or the skin issue and the desire of the sick frog to leave the tank. Is this a sigh of the final throws or is this part of a recovery?
Regards,
Ed
Pelzig blurted:
begun treatment with Triple Sulfa and tetracycline. Unfortunately, the his skin looks like it is sloughing off in patches and ... frog to leave the tank. Is this a sigh of the final throws or is this part of a recovery?

Sounds like you're burning/poisoning him with the drugs.

fr0glet
I have an albino frog which,

What kind of albino frog? African Clawed (Xenopus sp.)? Dwarf African Clawed (Hymenchirus sp.)?
a few days ago, developed signs of Red
Leg, at least as far as the websites listed it. But, the frog looked

The only way to truly diagnose red leg (Aeromonas bacterial infection) is with a visit to your vet and a culture.
After about ten or eleven hours after the first treatment, the redness in the frog's leg decreased but his skin ... of the tank. The other two frogs seem totally uneffected and continue as they have been in terms of activity.

How exactly are you treating the frog? Orally, topically, injections, soaks? What dosage are you using?
It's possible that you're overmedicating and poisoning your frog. Or the frog may not have an aeromonas infection at all and needs to be treated for something else.
Your vet will be able to provide the proper treatment at the proper dose.
I'm a bit confused now. Nowhere did I see the vomiting and such described or the skin issue and the desire of the sick frog to leave the tank. Is this a sigh of the final throws or is this part of a recovery?

This is not part of recovery. And if it is Aeromonas (or a host of other things), it is likely that your other frogs will become infected too. Best to get a solid diagnosis and proper treatment.
-Z
I'm sure this problem comes up quite a bit and I did search deja.com and got some info from previous ... one heater so I floated the smaller tank in the larger ) so I'm just treating the whole thing now.

There ain't no such thing as an albino African dwarf frog. If you've got an aquatic albino frog, you have Xenopus laevis, the African clawed frog:
http://mike-edwardes.members.beeb.net/Amphibiary/Xenopus.html

Mike.

Mike Edwardes Tropicals
http://mike-edwardes.members.beeb.net