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Well, if we're going to say "true albino", then it ... for Patrick Alexander's informative post on this subject, now. fr0glet

Well, actually there are a few morphs out there that lack all forms of pigmentation. Those could fall under the complete definition of albino. Chad

Got jpgs?
fr0glet

"You cannot be an objective scientist if you have an agenda." ~The Madman
Well, if we're going to say "true albino", then it ... for Patrick Alexander's informative post on this subject, now. fr0glet

Well, actually there are a few morphs out there that lack all forms of pigmentation. Those could fall under the complete definition of albino. Chad

The term true albino usually refers to a form of albinism in which all pigmentation (except hemoglobin red blood cells) is absent. Thus, the red eyes.
Albinism, as applied to reptiles:
albino any of several genetic mutations resulting in reduced or absent pigmentation.
amelanistic a form of albinism in which the pigment melanin is absent, resulting in no black or brown coloration.

anerythristic a form of albinism in which yellow and red pigments are absent, resulting in black, white, and silver coloration.

axanthic a form of albinism in which amelanistic and anerythristic traits are combined, resulting in pure white coloration (snow forms). If amelanism and anerythrisim are complete, the term true albino applies.
erythristic increased red pigmentation.
melanistic increased melanin (dark forms).
nerythristic increased yellow and red pigmentation.

peibald; piebald; piedbald a mutation in which the animal has patches in which coloration is absent.
xanthic increased yellow pigmentation.
In humans and other mammals, melanin constitutes almost all pigmentation. Remove the melanin, and everything (except red blood cells and a few other things) goes colorless or clear, which we view as white. There are varying degrees of albinism in both reptiles and mammals.
Ron Tremper explains why some "albino" leopard geckos turn brown: http://www.leopardgecko.com/color.html
Ron Tremper explains why some "albino" leopard geckos turn brown: http://www.leopardgecko.com/color.html

Very cool information. Thanks.
-Z
Well, actually there are a few morphs out there that lack all forms of pigmentation. Those could fall under the complete definition of albino. Chad

Got jpgs? fr0glet

None I have found yet. I was looking through some BP images and didn't find any. What we see are bred color morphs. A true albino would be more of a genetic defect and aberation more than a bred trait currently.

When you have three pigmentation traits, it would be much harder to get a true albino, but it is definantly something that can happen.

Chad
Ron Tremper explains why some "albino" leopard geckos turn brown: http://www.leopardgecko.com/color.html

Very interesting. Thanks for the link.
Scott
Got jpgs? fr0glet

None I have found yet. I was looking through some BP images and didn't find any. What we see are ... traits, it would be much harder to get a true albino, but it is definantly something that can happen. Chad

How about blizzard corns? Bred to remove red, black and yellow.

http://www.reptileallsorts.com/cornphase/win7.html

Jennifer
None I have found yet. I was looking through some ... albino, but it is definantly something that can happen. Chad

How about blizzard corns? Bred to remove red, black and yellow. http://www.reptileallsorts.com/cornphase/win7.html Jennifer

Those have some patterning to them, right? That would be faint pigmentation. What I am thinking of is an animal that is white as the white parts of a pibald ball. The chances of this would be very rare. They have a ball morph listed on NERD that has the slightly pinkish white skin without pattern that gives the albino look, just the eyes are dark so it is a little off of a 100% albino.
Chad
Those have some patterning to them, right? That would be faint pigmentation. What I am thinking of is an animal ... gives the albino look, just the eyes are dark so it is a little off of a 100% albino. Chad

Chad, I have seen pics on the web of something called a "leucistic" snake. Completely white, except for the eyes, which were black.

Click the "pythons" link under here for an example:

http://www.boamorphs.co.uk/

Phil
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