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How about blizzard corns? Bred to remove red, black and yellow. http://www.reptileallsorts.com/cornphase/win7.html

Those have some patterning to them, right? That would be faint pigmentation. What I am thinking of is an animal ... that gives the albino look, just the eyes are dark so it is a little off of a 100% albino.

What about a leucistic black rat snake?

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anerythristic a form of albinism in which yellow and red pigments are absent, resulting in black, white, and silver coloration. axanthic a ... are combined, resulting in pure white coloration (snow forms). If amelanism and anerythrisim are complete, the term true albino applies.

melanistic = relates to black pigment
erythristic = relates to red pigment
xanthic = relates to yellow pigment
A or An = none
Hyper = more of than usual
Hypo = less of than usual
Therefore,
Amelanistic = (Amel)no black in the pattern
Hypomelanistic = very little black in the pattern
Hypermelanistic = a lot of black in the pattern
Anerythristic = no red in pattern
Axanthic = no yellow in the pattern

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Ron Tremper explains why some "albino" leopard geckos turn brown: http://www.leopardgecko.com/color.html

Fascinating!
griffin
Those have some patterning to them, right? That would be faint pigmentation. What I am thinking of is an animal ... gives the albino look, just the eyes are dark so it is a little off of a 100% albino. Chad

No, they have no patterning at all. The snows have saddles, but the blizzards do not. According to Kathy Love's site, www.cornutopia.com: "Just like in a blizzard, all you see is white! I’ve finally bred out virtually ALL pigment; blotches can barely be counted, even under a strong light! This morph actually exhibits amelanism and charcoal (type B anerythrism) in the same animal." A note adds that in older animals some yellow may appear.
Jennifer
It is an "albino." Take my word. Most likely a tremper albino since you got it in a pet store.