1 2
Short sequences definitely have their place. They're best for teaching new skills and for keeping the dog fresh. I see a lot of dogs who start out really slow on courses and only speed up at the very end and in some cases those dogs have been worked too often on long sequences without enough intermittent reward. But at least my dogs need a longer sequences on a somewhat regular basis or they start getting incredibly frustrated. They just get started and they have to stop! For us, what works well is a class that has a number of short sequences that you then put together at the end for a full course. Best of both worlds.
You've probably seen me say this before, but... my agility instructor says that dogs do agility for one or more ... the rewards they get, and some - this is the rarest trait - because they intrinsically enjoy doing the obstacles.

Friday, when I got him at 7 months, immediately loved the obstacles. This gave me the foundation for reason #1.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog, Friday's a 3-reason Dog.
You've probably seen me say this before, but... my agility ... rarest trait - because they intrinsically enjoy doing the obstacles.

Friday, when I got him at 7 months, immediately loved the obstacles. This gave me the foundation for reason #1.

Kavik is a dog who loves the obstacles - he finds them very rewarding. This made it rather difficult to learn to handle, because if I was slow or stopped or fumbled, Kavik didn't wait for me to figure out what I was going to do next.
Toklat is a dog who does agility because he likes food and to be with mom. I really am not sure I want to compete with him because I don't feel he LOVES it the way Kavik does. So, we just practice and try and keep things fun. I assumed an athletic dog like Toklat would love to do obstacles, but he appears to only enjoy a couple (contacts).
Short sequences definitely have their place.

Aw heck *I* know that. It's convincing the beast that I have difficulty with...
They're best for teaching
new skills and for keeping the dog fresh. I see a lot of dogs who start out really slow on ... number of short sequences that you then put together at the end for a full course. Best of both worlds.

That tends to be what we do in classes, at least in one (I have Wylie in two different level classes, one primarily novice/pre-novice dogs, one mostly masters/excellent dogs.) Wylie has no problem doing short, heavily rewarded sequences that don't get his motor revved, i.e. contact drills, but short jumping sequences are frustrating to him, especially if I try to stop and reward him in the middle. We still *do* them, he just has to learn to handle it.
Christy
that dogs do agility for one or more of three reasons: some do it because : they like to please ... the obstacles. Solo fits all these criteria but I think it's #3 that makes him so fun to work with.

Tanith was like that. When I first started in agility one thing we had to work on was not taking any obstacle unless told/permitted to do so. Of course the whole reason I got into agility was because she was always climbing on boulders, jumping into trees, and walking on fences and walls. I got serious about looking for an agility class when she found a board precariously balanced over two boulders and ran back and forth along its length while it wobbbled.
Tsuki got bored while a Power Paws instructor was coaching me. He proceeded to take the entire course by himself. And when he noticed we still weren't ready for him he did it again.

Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com /
http://dogplay.com/Shop /