My sister's dog gets panic during thunderstorms. She never leaves him during one, but unfortunately the other week she was at the store when one hit at the house, she didn't even know it had happened until she got home and the dog in his crate had panicked and there was blood everywhere from his tooth which he had partially knocked out.

Can you give Ativan to dogs? There's another drug (Prochlorperazine? I forget the name) the vet wants to give him but my sister believes this immobilizes the animal doing nothing for their fear. She wants something to help her poor dog not feel so scared in addition to keeping him from hurting himself.
[nq:1]My sister's dog gets panic during thunderstorms. She never leaves him during one, but unfortunately the other week she was ... She wants something to help her poor dog not feel so scared in addition to keeping him from hurting himself.
NutriCalm has worked wonderfully for us.

No, I have nothing to do with the company, just a satisfied customer. Although, you must know when the storm is coming, and give it before it hits. I was told by my vet that during storm season, she could take it on a regular basis. We did not opt to do that.

Sue and Atty
[nq:2]My sister's dog gets panic during thunderstorms. She never leaves ... so scared in addition to keeping him from hurting himself.
NutriCalm has worked wonderfully for us.
No, I have nothing to do with the company, just ... vet that during storm season, she could take it on a regular basis. We did not opt to do that.

This was discussed at length at least a year ago. I suggested using an air cleaner with a negative ion generator to help calm the dog (and people too). Thunderstorms generate an electrical potential which is in the form of a build-up of negative ions in the clouds and corresponding positive ions near the ground. Critters (including humans) sense this as a precursor to lightning, and causes them to feel afraid and instinctually seek protection (such as hiding under a bed). When lightning finally strikes, it neutralizes and reverses this charge, which is one reason why we often feel relieved toward the end of the storm. The rain also helps neutralize the charge.
Negative ions produce a feeling of well-being. An air cleaner can generate them in a small area, such as where the dog usually sleeps or hides. The sound of the fan may also help mask the sound of distant thunder. Dogs also sense the drop in atmospheric pressure, and not much can be done about that, although (possibly) forcing air into a room by using a large fan may create enoughh positive pressure to help a little bit. A barometer may be able to detect this increased pressure. And the sound of a larger fan may do even more to mask the distant thunder.
Cesar Millan (IIRC) says that dogs can be desensitized to the sounds of thunder by playing a recording of thunderstorms at increasing volume. If the dog reacts fearfully, it is important to remain calm to assure the dog that you, as a leader, are not afraid. You should not reward the dog for fear by extra attention and cuddling, but instead reduce the volume and then reward the dog when he is no longer showing signs of fear.

Fortunately Muttley is not very fearful of storms, although he will stay close to me and sometimes crawl under the bed. But he will also accompany me outside on the porch to watch the rain and lightning, and listen to the thunder booming throught the hollow. His lack of disabling fear also means I do not have direct experience with the methods I mentioned above, but they are at least based on harmless non-chemical means, and should be tried first. Sometimes dogs have a paradoxical opposite reaction to anti-anxiety drugs, such as Valium, and become agitated and aggressive. Perhaps they sense that they have been drugged and fight it.
Good luck.
Paul and Muttley
This was discussed at length at least a year ago. Paul and Muttley

I'll have to do some backreading. I don't remember that discussion.

Atty (lab who will be 8 in May) had no issues with thunder or fireworks until she hit 4-ish. None, nothing, nada, zip. No reaction.
Then, one day we were in a parade, (I love campaign season - NOT - notice the sarcasm!!!) behind the civil war recreation people. Every time they shot the gun, she got worse. First shot, she sat, the next time she cowered, third shot she just wouldn't move at all. Considering my husband was the candidate and we couldn't exactly get out of the parade route, he ended up picking her up (to generous applause from the parade goers), and putting her in the borrowed Hummer I was driving (convertable, I might add, with the back open).

I drove the rest of the parade with a cowering dog on borrowed leather seats (she was on a towel), holding her leash in case she jumped out the back ...Scared dog nails and borrowed $125,000 worth of vehicle with leather seats is not my idea of a fun evening! Needless to say, her political parade days ended right there. Not worth it for the "dog factor". Yes, I could give her Nutricalm each parade day, but it's just not fair to her.

After that, fireworks, gun shots, thunder = digging in the corner and hiding in the closet. Playing thunderstorm recordings did nothing. She didn't react to them, but the real thing... well, I couldn't fool her. Of course, she also reacted the same way to football and hockey on TV. Go figure. Now, she saunters off the couch and heads to the bedroom as soon as a game comes on. At least she just leaves, and isn't in a panic.
I can understand the scientific weather, barometer, pressure thing with thunderstorms, but there's nothing like that with fireworks. She doesn't want to leave the confines of the condo at night when we're at the beach, due to all the fireworks being set off (illegally, I might add). Since she's fine *in* the condo at the beach, I choose to not medicate her, but take her out early and not walk her on the beach at night. At home on the 4th of July, 1 dose of Nutricalm, and she hangs peacefully in the house.
There's a dragstrip a mile or so from our house and they set off fireworks on Saturday nights throughout the summer. She's been mid-stream and headed for the house in a hurry on those nights when I miscalculate the timing of the fireworks. She has no issue with the jet engine night (I do!), but fireworks night, not her favorite. Come to think of it, last summer, I think I only gave her NutriCalm once - storm wise. She did beautifully during storm season.
I do have to laugh, though.. On election night, we had her at headquarters with us. She was mid poo when the 10:00 curfew fire whistle went off. I thought that poo was going to go back up in her. Poor thing! It never occurred to me that we were right by the whistle and it was going to go off (this was in a different town than we live in - we don't have a nightly whistle). I felt so bad for her.
Sue and Atty

This was discussed at length at least a year ago. Paul and Muttley

I'll have to do some backreading. I don't remember that discussion.

it was discussed at length... it would have been two summers ago when i put harvey on clomipramine and xanax for his thunderstorm issues, something i do not regret even a tiny little bit. it was the very best decision i could have made for him and i wish i had gone straight to drugs instead of messing around with stuff like melatonin beforehand. ah well.

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Thunderstorms generate an electrical potential which is in the form
of a build-up of negative ions in the clouds and corresponding positive ions near the ground. Critters (including humans) sense this as a precursor to lightning, and causes them to feel afraid and instinctually seek protection (such as hiding under a bed).

First, it's only SOME "critters" -regardless of species - who are affected that way. The majority are not affected that strongly, and many (particularly humans) are oblivious.
Second, many (if not most) dogs who fear thunderstorms are primarily affected by the noise of the thunder, and not always because it IS thunder. For one reference point, see Sue's story about Atty. For another, I'll add that Brenin reacts strongly to the sound of gunshots. I'm 99.9% sure that the reaction is based on actual experience with a gun or guns being fired, because he's also reacted very strongly to the smell of gunpowder. He somewhat generalizes that to the sound of fireworks, and in a lesser way to SOME thunderstorms - only the ones that have loud, cracking booms of thunder. It's not something I've needed to work with because his reaction to thunder is much milder than his reaction to actual gunshots.