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You're about my age. When did dogs "run in the streets"?

In both neighborhoods I lived in as a child (birth to age 14), dogs roamed off-leash. I don't remember anybody keeping their dogs fenced or tied outside, except for my own family. And I never saw anybody walking a dog on a leash.

If they hadn't been running loose, I wouldn't have gotten so close to so many of them at a young age, and I may not be the dog-nut I am today. :}
We had dogs in the neighborhood I grew up in, who escaped, terrorized people and other dogs, etc, but no happy-friendly-family-pals-o'mine doggie cliques.

I had to rescue an occasional cat, but I don't recall any dog fights or human aggression. In the 2nd neighborhood (age 6-14), there were at least 8 dogs who would accompany me when I walked up the street to my friend's house. These dogs were always together. There was never any fighting between them, and when a new dog appeared in the neighborhood, he would join "the pack" without any apparent stress.
This was in pretty average 'burbs in the 60's.

These were small New England town-just-becoming-a-city burbs. The second one was still countrified - I had a cow field in my back yard.
Most dog I know have a lot more than they would from being chained or fenced in their yard all day - which is more as they "used" to be kept.

Now that's what I see around here. I'm surrounded by neighbors who leave their dogs in their fenced yard and/or chained 24/7. My last two neighborhoods - in Ladson SC and Orlando - were the same, though Ladson had few dogs running free on the streets.
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Here in the Netherlands it is technically required to keep the dog on the lead in the cities and towns, ... everyonedoes seem to get away with it just fine. Out in the countryside, I have never seen a leash. Katrina

I wonder why it is so acceptable in Europe to enter a shopping centre or bakery etc..with a dog. I think that is wonderful and very open minded. Here in North America it is so frowned upon to let dogs enter any establishment that isn't meant for dogs. I think they are afraid of maybe the dog defecating or maybe biting someone??
i had some time in spain recently and one thing ... something i noticed. It may not be representative at all.

Here in the Netherlands it is technically required to keep the dog on the lead in the cities and towns, ... does seem to get away with it just fine. Out in the countryside, I have never seen a leash. Katrina

Thanks for that interesting read. it does seem to me that the more relaxed we (i.e. society) is about dogs the more relaxed the dogs are, as a general rule.
I remember seeing a couple of dogs trotting along by their bike riding owners before, they're natural will to remain with 'the pack' is evident from that
Of course there's probably a hidden side i didn't see, some dogs must just get lost now and then.

There are many stray dogs in Spain, could this be why you saw so many dogs off a lead.

they were evidently with people. i'd guess that if someone was being followed continually by a stray dog they'd notice and react to that!
It's just an interesting thing to notice, anyone any other observations to share on dogs of the leash, attitudes in other countries etc

Back in the day, when everybody's dogs ran the streets, I believe that dogs were friendlier in general. It makes ... be a lot more socialization issues. However, I'll trade that for not seeing canine road kill on a regular basis.

It's difficult to tell if dogs are more stressed and less happy (evidence: socilisation problems) now than in the past. you'd trade that for some less accidents? I suppose i can see why, some dog accidents alo result in dead and injured people.
is there a happy medium?
that dogs

people who are going to have to leave dogs alone for large tracts of time should reconsider whether they should hav dogs at all. where's the mutual benefit if the dog is alone all the time and the person too busy to enjoy the dog's companionship?
i had some time in spain recently and one thing ... something i noticed. It may not be representative at all.

Different attitudes about dogs off leash certainly exist across cultures. That is true inside the US, as well as outside. Spain has some of the most draconian breed specific legislation around.

i wasn;t aware of that. you mean stuff like "all rottweilers have to be leashed" or somesuch?
I didn't see any problems happening, but might have just ... must be less 'exciting' if it happens all the time.

It is partly that, and partly killing of and exerminating dogs that do less well in that situation.

i guess dogs that aren't naturally inclined to stay with their pack arent going to do well in a natural dog pack either.
if dogs that were almost always on leash were let ... not overexcited at the prospect of freedom from the leash.

There is absolutely the aspect that when dogs are made more a part of every day life that it will increase the chances they will behave in a more socially acceptable manner.

i think that's the key.

it's up to people to review whether or not their life style is compatible with dog owernship too, rather than try to force-fit the animal into their lifecyle by buying stuff that enables them to leave dogs on their own most of the time.
i had some time in spain recently and one thing ... something i noticed. It may not be representative at all.

Yes, we have a horrible attitude toward it in the US and we can thank the busybody Toxic Mommy Control ... are typically overweight and undersexed with excess free time and a deep need to "feel" they are doing something good.

you gonna write a book on that social trend!?
They spend vast amounts of energy making offleash dogs seem like a horrible problem that can't be tolerated. Dogs are ... back room of the shelter. Dogs are tolerated all over the world much more than they are in the US.

i do think the US is far closer to being neurotic about dogs, well, in parts anyway. there's far more of a market of 'stuff to buy', sprays, hi-tech collars, crates for all occasions (except just being with the dog!) and all that stuff. it all seems like an inability to just have a companion animal, let it be part of your life and relax with that, but some compulsion to 'improve' and control it, to buy add-ons, to employ 'dog psychologists' and various other services. what that tells me is that there is an increasing tension between the actual lives of many dog owners and the kind of life that suits being a dog owner.
Streets would be safer if there were more loose dogs. They would slow down traffic, even if some of them ... have. Overzealous legislation cripples owners and dogs and dumbs them and their relationships and training down to a pitiful level.

i suspect those spanish dogs weren't "trained" by the standard of a typical training school, but rather just very good companinions, which may well be much better "training" than an overly formalised 'go to school' approach.
a less neurotic attitude to dogs, in society generally, seems much healthier
"Leah" that dogs well-socialized with there seem to

You're about my age. When did dogs "run in the streets"? We had dogs inthe neighborhood I grew up in, ... on, impregnations (Ok, that could classify as a form of "friendly"), etc. This was in pretty average 'burbsin the 60's.

Jumping in.. I'm 35. When I was growing up in a small town in the Santa Cruz mountains in California, many dogs spent the day ranging around the mountain, stopping off at people's houses, heading out into the woods for a bit, then settling in for a few hours in groups on this or that porch. One dog had a reputation as a snapper, and we were warned as children not to interact with him. I remember a couple of fights, one requiring a few stitches afterward, but nothing really serious. The biggest issue was garbage-can raiding.
Katrina
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