i had some time in spain recently and one thing i noticed, at least in the town in was in, was that many more dogs were off the leash than you might find in a typical US town, or UK or North Europe. i'd take a guess that about half the dogs i saw were off leash. its not a proper study, just something i noticed. It may not be representative at all.
I didn't see any problems happening, but might have just been lucky. the dogs seemed to happily follow their owners, even through more crowded areas. dog to dog interactions were easy going, must be less 'exciting' if it happens all the time.
if dogs that were almost always on leash were let off leash all at once in a fairly busy town i imagine theyd go crazy (for a while), but if that's just the norm then perhaps the dogs get used to it, not overexcited at the prospect of freedom from the leash.

Of course there's probably a hidden side i didn't see, some dogs must just get lost now and then, or run over, and i did see more dogs that you'd call 'mixed breeds' which may or may not hint at some of those dog to dog interactions being a little more 'productive' from the the dogs perspective!
It's just an interesting thing to notice, anyone any other observations to share on dogs of the leash, attitudes in other countries etc
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i had some time in spain recently and one thing i noticed, at least in the town in was in, ... interesting thing to notice, anyone any other observations to share on dogs of the leash, attitudes in other countries etc

Here in the Netherlands it is technically required to keep the dog on the lead in the cities and towns, but this is only enforced when a dog causes any trouble. Only one park is officially totally off-lead but dogs are happily tolerated off-lead anyway in most places it's a lot like the cannabis laws: not technically strictly legal but ignored unless causing a problem. Our Dane puppy enjoys a walk around the local apartment blocks, which are surrounded by bicycle paths and park-like lawns, off-lead, and plays with whole packs of dogs in some of the fields.
The general convention here is that if your dog has a problem with dogs, children, bicycles, horses, etc. or runs around disregarding where it's lawn and where it's bike path, or chases the chickens and ducks and peacocks spilling over from the neighborhood petting farm, that sort of thing, you put it on the line. Thus we do have her on a "short" (2 meter) lead around roads, an 8-meter Flexi where the grassy bits are narrow and the fronts of the apartment blocks are, and off-lead in the park-like bits.

Saskia goes on the short lead when we enter the shopping center, but probably won't always have to lots of dogs that are well-behaved just follow their owners along in there off-lead, but it is considered polite to leash them before entering the post office, butcher ,bakery, etc., but if they're well behaved they can be loose in the bar. Saskia has three friends that can often be found unleashed in the local bar a Dogue de Bordeaux pup, a pit bull, and an American Bulldog.Downtown, I see a lot of dogs off-lead, and they seem to handle themselves extremely well around what I consider to be insane traffic, with cars, buses, trams, scooters, you name it. I have never seen or heard of a dog getting hit or causing an accident, but I'm sure it must happen. It is also very crowded in downtown Amsterdam, but they seem to keep right on track, and just plain ignore other dogs when following their owners.

Often, very often, an off-lead dog will be seen just trotting along in the bike lane next to its owner on a bicycle. That's a norm here. Most of these dogs do go on-lead to enter restaurants or get on public transport. I personally will never take our pup, even when grown up, downtown off-lead. But everyone does seem to get away with it just fine.
Out in the countryside, I have never seen a leash.

Katrina
It's just an interesting thing to notice, anyone any other observations to share on dogs of the leash, attitudes in other countries etc

Back in the day, when everybody's dogs ran the streets, I believe that dogs were friendlier in general. It makes sense - they were well-socialized with all the neighborhood kids, adults, and other animals. Nowadays there seem to be a lot more socialization issues.
However, I'll trade that for not seeing canine road kill on a regular basis.

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i had some time in spain recently and one thing i noticed, at least in the town in was in, ... saw were off leash. its not a proper study, just something i noticed. It may not be representative at all.

Different attitudes about dogs off leash certainly exist across cultures. That is true inside the US, as well as outside. Spain has some of the most draconian breed specific legislation around.
I didn't see any problems happening, but might have just been lucky. the dogs seemed to happily follow their owners, even through more crowded areas. dog to dog interactions were easy going, must be less 'exciting' if it happens all the time.

It is partly that, and partly killing of and exerminating dogs that do less well in that situation.
if dogs that were almost always on leash were let off leash all at once in a fairly busy town ... the norm then perhaps the dogs get used to it, not overexcited at the prospect of freedom from the leash.

There is absolutely the aspect that when dogs are made more a part of every day life that it will increase the chances they will behave in a more socially acceptable manner.
Of course there's probably a hidden side i didn't see, some dogs must just get lost now and then, or ... not hint at some of those dog to dog interactions being a little more 'productive' from the the dogs perspective!

Yes. There is that as well. As well as in some countries (I don't know about Spain) killing off the excess brings much less public angst that in other countries.
It's just an interesting thing to notice, anyone any other observations to share on dogs of the leash, attitudes in other countries etc

The variation from country and rural to suburban is huge and complex. And it is ever changing as our cutlure globalizes, and our life styles change. When cultures move away from typically working in , around or close to home and begin spending long periods away inside buildings there are some gradual changes that filter down to what happens with our dogs.

Diane Blackman
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i had some time in spain recently and one thing i noticed, at least in the town in was in, ... interesting thing to notice, anyone any other observations to share on dogs of the leash, attitudes in other countries etc

Yes, we have a horrible attitude toward it in the US and we can thank the busybody Toxic Mommy Control Freak "Humane" Society "dog lover" types that you find around here. Most of them are white women in the 30s to 50s age range. They are typically overweight and undersexed with excess free time and a deep need to "feel" they are doing something good.
They spend vast amounts of energy making offleash dogs seem like a horrible problem that can't be tolerated. Dogs are better off dead than loose. They will get frantic busy body impulses when they see a dog running down the street and pull over wildly and cause a traffic accident only to take the dog to the shelter so they can pat themselves on the back. Next day, the dog that was happily going about his business on the street is in a big pile or stuffed in a barrel in the back room of the shelter.
Dogs are tolerated all over the world much more than they are in the US.
Streets would be safer if there were more loose dogs. They would slow down traffic, even if some of them got run over. I see zero problems with scratching all leash laws and simply making laws or enforcing laws where dogs attack people or other pets.
It also is a reason that so few people here have truly trained dogs like the kinds you saw in Spain and the kind I have. Overzealous legislation cripples owners and dogs and dumbs them and their relationships and training down to a pitiful level.
Which is why I largely ignore it.
I hope that was of heelp to you.

this is michael
the voice of reason
http://dogtv.com
Of course there's probably a hidden side i didn't see, some dogs must just get lost now and then.

There are many stray dogs in Spain, could this be why you saw so many dogs off a lead.
were friendlier in general. It makes sense - they werewell-socialized with all the neighborhood kids, adults, and other animals. Nowadaysthere seem to be a lot more socialization issues.

Hi Leah ,
Perhaps but don't you think that leaving puppies alone all day and lack of time contibute to under socialised dogs? I wonder how much chance some pups get to socialise, kept in crate all day with no break, a quick walk round the block am and pm , a bit longer at weekends and maybe puppy classes once or twice a week? I don't think that's enough.
Alison
You're about my age. When did dogs "run in the streets"? We had dogs in the neighborhood I grew up in, who escaped, terrorized people and other dogs, etc, but no happy-friendly-family-pals-o'mine doggie cliques. In fact, I surely remember more than one dog fight going on, impregnations (Ok, that could classify as a form of "friendly"), etc. This was in pretty average 'burbs in the 60's.
Hi Leah , Perhaps but don't you think that leaving puppies alone all day and lack of time contibute to ... a bit longer at weekends and maybe puppy classes once or twice a week? I don't think that's enough. Alison

Most dog I know have a lot more than they would from being chained or fenced in their yard all day - which is more as they "used" to be kept. My dogs get a ton of socialization, and yet, they still mostly ignore other dogs when out and about. Unless it's another FCR, Franklin doesn't care at all.
Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com /
Perhaps but don't you think that leaving puppies alone all day and lack of time contibute to under socialised dogs?

Absolutely. When I was a child, most households were one-income. Moms were home all the time. So that's definitely another factor.

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