Can anyone advise a rank beginner (web links?) on researching the keeping of snakes and lizards in Queensland, Australia (have read the government legal sites). I am looking for technical info on construction of housing and advice on choice of snake or lizard. International sites with housing plans would also be appreciated.
Regards

David Richardson
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Can anyone advise a rank beginner (web links?) on researching the keeping of snakes and lizards in Queensland, Australia (have ... of housing and advice on choice of snake or lizard. International sites with housing plans would also be appreciated. Regards

You truly do live in the lucky country when it comes to herps. Australia is home to some of the most beautiful, charismatic and docile herps (as well as some of the most beautiful, charismatic and deadly ones).

You might want to look into blue tongued skinks (Tiliqua ssp.), bearded dragons (Pogona ssp.), carpet pythons (Morelia spilota), and children's pythons (Anteresia childrensi). All of these make great first herp pets. You can find tons of info on these from Google and there are several good books about most of them.
I'm also partial to Storr's Monitors (Varanus storrii), Shingleback Skinks (Tiliqua rugosa), and Black-headed Pythons (Aspidites melanocephalus), but I'm not sure how easy they are to obtain there. The Black-headed python also gets fairly big so may not be the ideal first-time snake, but boy is it a beaut!
Luke may also have some monitor lizard suggestions for you.

As for cage building instructions - each of these animals has such different requirements that I couldn't begin to think about an enclosure until I had decided on an animal to go into it.

-Z
Can anyone advise a rank beginner (web links?) on researching ... International sites with housing plans would also be appreciated. Regards

You truly do live in the lucky country when it comes to herps. Australia is home to some of the ... I couldn't begin to think about an enclosure until I had decided on an animal to go into it. -Z

Thank you Z for the comprehensive reply. One of my reasons for asking for links was on the chance that experienced herpetologists may point me in the direction of ethical dealers etc. I suppose the best option would be to locate the nearest herpetological society.
Regards

David Richardson
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You truly do live in the lucky country when it ... the most beautiful, charismatic and deadly ones). big snip<< -Z[/nq]
Thank you Z for the comprehensive reply. One of my reasons for asking for links was on the chance that ... ethical dealers etc. I suppose the best option would be to locate the nearest herpetological society. Regards David Richardson

David,
If you are looking for aus dealers, may I suggest you join australianherps@yahoogroups as they have quite a few FS ads, and have some knowlegable breeders. There are a few other yahoogroups that ar specific to particular herps, but that is a good start for aussies. N
G'day David
I'm in Aus (NSW), you can try these links
http://www.australianreptilesonline.com/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/australianherps /
These are aussie groups, and have all the info you require HTH
happy herping
regards
Matt

:: Can anyone advise a rank beginner (web links?) on researching the :: keeping of snakes and lizards in Queensland, Australia (have read :: the government legal sites). I am looking for technical info on :: construction of housing and advice on choice of snake or lizard. :: International sites with housing plans would also be appreciated. :: Regards
:
: You truly do live in the lucky country when it comes to herps. : Australia is home to some of the most beautiful, charismatic and : docile herps (as well as some of the most beautiful, charismatic and : deadly ones).
:
: You might want to look into blue tongued skinks (Tiliqua ssp.), : bearded dragons (Pogona ssp.), carpet pythons (Morelia spilota), and : children's pythons (Anteresia childrensi). All of these make great : first herp pets. You can find tons of info on these from Google and : there are several good books about most of them. :
: I'm also partial to Storr's Monitors (Varanus storrii), Shingleback : Skinks (Tiliqua rugosa), and Black-headed Pythons (Aspidites : melanocephalus), but I'm not sure how easy they are to obtain there. : The Black-headed python also gets fairly big so may not be the : ideal first-time snake, but boy is it a beaut!
:
: Luke may also have some monitor lizard suggestions for you. :
: As for cage building instructions - each of these animals has : such different requirements that I couldn't begin to think : about an enclosure until I had decided on an animal to go into it. :
: -Z
:
:
Thank you Z for the comprehensive reply. One of my reasons for asking for links was on the chance that experienced herpetologists may point me in the direction of ethical dealers etc. I suppose the best option would be to locate the nearest herpetological society. Regards
Luke may also have some monitor lizard suggestions for you.

I'm drooling already.
But anyway, a good monitor to look at would be Varanus acanthurus . I don't know what they are called down under (possibly the ridge tailed goanna) but in the US we mostly call them ackies. They are docile, hardy, active, interesting, have fascinating group dynamics, and do not get enormous. There are a number of other dwarf monitors you guys have that we cannot get in the US, some are good to keep, others are flighty or delicate.
Unless you are really interested in the giant monitors, I'd recommend staying away from them at first. It takes a lot of work and money to get such huge cages set up right.
Good luck
Luke

To email me, take out the trash.
Can anyone advise a rank beginner (web links?) on researching the keeping of snakes and lizards in Queensland, Australia (have ... of housing and advice on choice of snake or lizard. International sites with housing plans would also be appreciated. Regards

Wow! I knew this was going to be one of those great groups where interest in the subject outweighs the inclination to get on a soapbox or shoot the newbie down in flames. Thanks for all the great info. Regards

David Richardson
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PS. Just for those who might wish to know... this is all about starting a hobbie to enjoy with my son who spends much of his time in a wheelchair and inside (Hot Tropical North Queensland). Last week I took him on a trip to Brisbane and visited Australia Zoo (Crikey Mate! Yes the home of the Croc Hunter!). We now have a great photo of my ten year old boy with a Boa (well..some sort of large python) wrapped around his waist. I have a photo of myself at five with a number of snakes drapped around my neck when I visited a Malaysian Snake Park. We are both hooked on these magnificent creatures.
I'm also partial to Storr's Monitors (Varanus storrii), >Shingleback Skinks (Tiliqua rugosa), and Black-headed Pythons (Aspidites melanocephalus)

There's this show in England (which we also pick up in Ireland) called "I'm a celebrity, get me out of here!"
Ex-popstar and teen heartthrob, Peter Andre, had to put his head into a box with water dragons, shingleback skinks and spotted pythons, as well as smaller snakes that the presenters Ant & Dec didn't know the name of and remove a red plastic star with his mouth in order to feed the camp of celebrities. As he was removing his head from the tank one of the smaller snakes struck at and bit the star.
Oh, and Johnny Rotten (of The Sex Pistols fame) had his back, arms and legs smeared with molasses and birdseed and then had to remove foodstars from a pen containing ostriches. The birds had a pecking good time
Your best bet is BLUETONGUE SKINKS!
They are the PERFECT pet.
Shinglebacks are also awesome pets. Get one if you can, they are beautiful!

We have some of the worlds most beautiful herps.
You cannot legally keep exotics (although there are a lot out there), but you certainly can keep native species.
~IMPX