I wasn't planning on coming home with one but..We bought a BP hatchling at a reptile show. The price was about a third of what we see them for in local pet stores. The seller told us that the BP was about
2 weeks old and has not shed or eaten, but should do just fine. Myson's been wanting a BP (already has very young kind and corn snake - seperate tanks ofcourse), this deal was hard to pass up..

On the way home, we stopped at a pet store that we trust, and had them take a look at him. Several employees tell us that our new BP is probably closer to a couple days old and that they don't sell their hatchlings until they have both shed and eaten (usually a couple weeks). They said until this time, it's a "wait and see" time period on how the hatchling is going to do, and that they disapprove of the ethics of selling a hatchling too soon.
We did a side by side comparison to their day old hatchlings, and there was no difference in the size or coloring between theirs and ours. Opinions please. Should we be worried?
I wasn't planning on coming home with one but..We bought a BP hatchling at a reptile show. The price was ... and there was no difference in the size or coloring between theirs and ours. Opinions please. Should we be worried?

I would be worried, a lot of PB never feed and die, which is why a good store only sells proven feeders.
Hope things are ok tho
Hi Jim,
Having sold hundreds of hatchlings to newbies and experienced individuals over the years, I'd have to say I also do not approve of selling any animal as a "pet" to an individual unless it has a proven feeding history.
I have however sold entire litters of boas to dealers only days after they were born. This was understood and accepted by the aformentioned dealers. These animals were sold at a wholesale price and the dealer then marks it up. I've also done the same with clutches of house snakes.

I wouldn't worry at this stage of the game. The snake shouldn't be presented with food until after the first shed. Keep the python on paper towels and mist the animals enclosure regularly.
Do not handle the snake and do provide it with a small hidebox, something that it can curl up in.
If the dealer you bought the animal from is in any way reputable, they should have no problem taking your calls, answering your questions and replacing the snake should it refuse to feed after a reasonable amount of time (about 2 months after the first shed, I'd say).

Cheers,
Kurt
Thanks,
Good suggestions.
He's in a ten gallon tank, good size bath tub, paper towels, under tank heater, 50 watt heat bulb in a refelcter globe, different bulb for night time, (temperature's right around 80 F) and I soaked some moss and packed the back of his hide with it. He curled up in it within minutes.
Kurt, you mentioned no handling. That's until after the first shed, AND feeding?
Thinking back to the rep show, we got there within an hour after they opened, and this fellow had his booth near the enterance. There were lines of people and kids waiting to handle these BP hatchlings. I can't imagine this being ok for the snakes. The purchased snake is then put in a small dixie cup and we observed many get jostled around as families look at the rest of the exhibitions. Not good. I felt guilty for buying one and continuing the support for this way of doing business.
When we got home, I set our BP down next to his pool, and he took a VERRY long drink. Poor little guy seemed dehydrated. So far he's staying in his hide, wrapped up in the moss. We'll hope for the best.
Kurt, you mentioned no handling. That's until >after the first shed, AND feeding?

That's correct. Only handle when necessary such as cage cleaning and the animal is taken from it's enclosure and immediately placed in a holding enclosure such as a Cool Whip container.
Handling means different things to different people. Handling to me means when I exhibit my animals for a school presentation or at a society event.
Handling to others means holding the snake for hours while watching Seinfeld reruns.
If you fit into the latter category, your snake may not acclimate properly.
Based upon your observations at the reptile show, I'd make sure to keep that vendor's phone number handy. Maybe I'm old-fashioned but their attitude towards their livestock seems much too cavalier.

Dehydration is the enemy of baby pythons until their first shed. If allowed to dry out, the unshed skin may adhere to the animal and may inhibit the intake and digestion of food.
Cheers,
Kurt