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I see plenty, though. Maybe it's because Sibes are a very popular breed here and I only see those that do well at off- leash parks and on trails.

You see them when the owner and dog are together. "My dog disappeared and was found 40 miles away a week later and I never would have gotten him back if he hadn't been microchipped" is what I see on Sibe mailing lists, etc.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Since January 2001 the federal budget outlook for 2002-2011 has deteriorated by $8.8 trillion.
I see plenty, though. Maybe it's because Sibes are a ... that do well at off- leash parks and on trails.

You see them when the owner and dog are together.

Of course the owner and dog are together.
"My dog disappeared and was found 40 miles away a week later and I never would have gotten him back if he hadn't been microchipped" is what I see on Sibe mailing lists, etc.

I haven't seen any "lost Sibe" posters at the off-leash parks, nor have I seen any running at large.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
That's your and Sarah's opinion. I've gone through the thread again and cannot see anything that makes me believe that Kanook KNOWS his recall.

Oh he knows! When not distracted, I have called "Kanook, Come!" from
500 feet away and he will turn around, look at me and start running tome. Many times in the woods too. I will lose sight of him and when I call, he comes running to me. In fact, a good way to get him to me is for me to hide behind brush or tall grass and he is visually concerned about where I disappered too and will search me out.

It's like he knows to keep in sight or earshot but not to get too close or I might put the leash on him. Well, I'm going to work on that. Early when at the parks he will come close. I'll try to sneak the leash on him, give praise and a treat, walk around for a minute and let him loose. Repeated every so often and perhaps that will lessen the idea that me wanting to put the leash on him means the fun is done. Comments on this approach are welcomed.
Oh he knows! When not distracted, I have called "Kanook, Come!" from 500 feet away and he will turn around, ... behind brush or tall grass and he is visually concerned about where I disappered too and will search me out.

you are lucky to have a husky who is reliable off lead. Most aren't.
It's like he knows to keep in sight or earshot but not to get too close or I might put ... that me wanting to put the leash on him means the fun is done. Comments on this approach are welcomed.

Better yet, put the leash on him, give him a treat and then let him go. It needs to be fun to get the leash on.
You have to be more interesting than those other dogs and people. You write that Kanook pays attention to you ... or keep a favourite toy hiiden to bring out for just this purpose. Or use food - whatever motivates him.

This is true, and it's exactly what I teach.
However, it's not fool-proof. I've yet to find a way to be more interesting to a cat-reactive dog than a running cat, for example.

When we practice "come" in class, there are times when I have to demonstrate with a particular dog who won't pay any attention to his owner. I'll run up to the dog squealing, wave a yummy treat under his nose, and run backwards with my arms outstretched. That gets the interest of most of the pups, and they respond.
However, there's still that one occasionally who totally ignores me and takes off towards another pup, no matter how over-the-top I act. And of course, the whole class bursts out laughing as I make a total fool of myself for nothing. }
At first, it is a matter of attempting to be as interesting as possible to the dog. But the way to achieve reliability is to proof the command with progressively escalating distractions. The goal is not necessarily to become more exciting than a running squirrel, but for the dog to learn that he has to obey your commands no matter what else is going on.

I tell my classes that when you start working with distractions, you have to be able to control the distractions. If not, you can't control the outcome. In other words, you don't practice "come" in the dog park until you've worked up to that level. First you set up distractions - i.e., somebody throwing a ball in his path as he's running to you. You work with the controllable distractions until the dog is reliable before you move on to uncontrollable distractions.
So at this stage, Kanook is not ready to be tested in the environment in which he's sure to fail. I think it was a wise move for the OP to leave when the other dogs and people showed up. Otherwise, Kanook would have blown him off again.
A group class would be a lovely way to help build control over distractions. I'd look for a smaller class (under 6 dogs) so that it's less chaotic. In most classes, the dogs and other people will not be allowed to interact during class. There's your controllable distractions. :}

Canine Action Dog Trainer
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You see them when the owner and dog are together. "My dog disappeared and was found 40 miles away a week later and I never would have gotten him back if he hadn't been microchipped" is what I see on Sibe mailing lists, etc.

Over the last 2 years, the rescue group has gotten in several sibes. Either they were found as strays and not claimed, or the owners purposely gave them up because they couldn't contain them.
At PetsMart, often people would ask me how to keep a dog inside a fence. My first question would be, "Is it a sibe?" It was amusing how often the owner's eyes would widen, and he/she would say "How did you know that?"

Canine Action Dog Trainer
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At PetsMart, often people would ask me how to keep a dog inside a fence. My first question would be, "Is it a sibe?" It was amusing how often the owner's eyes would widen, and he/she would say "How did you know that?"

I'm sure there are tendencies for this and that from any breed. My first Husky, Kanuck, only jumped the fence, a normal yard height, once in 14 years. Two yards down was a German Shepard that often would bark non-stop. Kanuck jumped our fence, went down the alley and jumped their fence and proceded to lay into the Shepard. Kanuck was winning until the neighbor intervened. Kanuck, unlike my present Kanook, barked only once in his life, that I know of, and the startled expression he made was amusing.
My present Husky has no fence to jump, but when out in the wild will run and jump like a deer. He likely could jump the fence on a regular basis.
It's like he knows to keep in sight or earshot ... the fun is done. Comments on this approach are welcomed.

Better yet, put the leash on him, give him a treat and then let him go. It needs to be fun to get the leash on.

I'll try that too.
Run away from him squealing like a little girl (really) ... just this purpose. Or use food - whatever motivates him.

This is true, and it's exactly what I teach.

How about for a 50ish man with a deep voice and a bum leg?
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