So it was warm enough today to bring my bearded dragon out. I was also watching my friend's French Bulldog. She shows an unnatural interest in the lizard. Every other dog, and there have been hundreds, are either completely unfazed by the lizard, or deathly afraid of him. But this dog is completely intrigued, and seems to want to eat the lizard. The lizard really doesn't care much, and just scoots away if the dog tries to pick it up in her mouth. We of course do not let the dog do this, though she tries so hard.

The way I see it is this, dogs do not have the instinct to know what to do with a lizard, and a lizard does not exactly look like food or prey for a dog. That is probably why most dogs aren't very interested, or even frightened. Has anyone else introduced their lizard to a dog, or dogs, and what has been your observations in this situation? By the way, there were some great pictures taken of the dog staring at the lizard, desperate just to get her little mouth on the lizard.

Maybe some will be posted somewhere.
My dogs have never paid much attention to my lizards. But then the lizards stay in their cages. When the dogs were younger they did want to play with my turtles, though. I lost a sulcata that way. They didn't want to eat it, just picked it up out of its sunning box and carried it around - but it was a baby and the dane crushed the shell. That's what I got for taking the turtles out without telling the family not to let the dogs out..

(
Cindy
Our cocker spaniel went to chase after a baby iguana when it ran past him, but I had a hold on his collar.
Reptiles are in no danger from the dog now, though. He's been afraid of them ever since a large red-eared slider bit him on the nose.

The neighbours' young cat is intrigued by our 2 1/2 year old iguana's tail tho.
So it was warm enough today to bring my bearded dragon out. I was also watching my friend's French Bulldog. ... staring at the lizard, desperate just to get her little mouth on the lizard. Maybe some will be posted somewhere.[/nq]I've got greyhounds and have met quite a few of them in the last year. All dogs have a prey drive, it's just stronger in certain individuals. A lot of greyhounds have strong ones since they were bred for hunting, and it's certainly possible for a French bulldog to want to kill small things! Greyhounds with strong prey drives can be so driven they will almost choke themselves trying to get loose to catch the prey.

Our first playgroup included a dog named Heidy who had killed cats in the past. One of our cats discovered the game of "show myself in the window and watch the dog go insane". Heidy would try to climb in through the (closed) window, and sometimes spent half or more of the time here hoping to catch a glimpse of the cat in the patio doors.

I'm sure dogs can key off of lizards as prey, especially if they see them run. The bulldog's behaviour reminds me of a greyhound that we considered adopting, but on the home visit he just wouldn't stop staring at the cats. He would try to get really close to them, and if the cat ever moved out of sight he would do whatever it took to see it again.

Also, any dog can figure out that if you catch something, you shake it all around and chew on it. My dogs have virtually no prey drive (they don't even care about the guinea pig), but they love to carry stuffed animals around shake them, throw them and catch them, pounce on them and chew them. They act a lot like cats, actually! I wouldn't trust them enough to leave them alone with a loose critter (except the cats, which they fear).
Jennifer
My dogs have never paid much attention to my lizards. But then the lizards stay in their cages. When the ... shell. That's what I got for taking the turtles out without telling the family not to let the dogs out..

I've never had a problem with my dogs and herps, although I know that my big stupid Akita would eat anything he could catch (he regularly leaves me parts of stray cats, possums, rabbits... anything that wanders into the yard).
On the other hand, way back when, I had a cat that I figured would be a problem with my iguanas. They had this huge custom-made cage with wire doors that opened on top and the cat used to lay on top of the cage, both because it was warm and because she liked to look at her 'lunch'. One night, the top of the cage collapsed while she was on it, flipping her into the cage and closing the door again above her.

Next morning, we woke up and found the cat in the cage yowling with two very *** off young iguanas whacking her repeatedly with their tails. She never laid on the cage again.
On the other hand, way back when, I had a cat that I figured would be a problem with my ... with two very *** off young iguanas whacking her repeatedly with their tails. She never laid on the cage again.

Hehe good story! Emotion: smile
I had an Akita that I could never break of killing my chickens. I even tried the time-honored method of tying the dead chicken around the dog's neck and letting it rot. All that accomplished was that no one wanted to pet the dog for a long time.
Cindy
I had an Akita that I could never break of killing my chickens. I even tried the time-honored method of ... and letting it rot. All that accomplished was that no one wanted to pet the dog for a long time.

Mine would just eat the chicken, bones and all, probably end up with a rope hanging out of his mouth.
Akitas are not very smart dogs.