The scene: a traffic light crossing
on a university campus in Japan. Carrion crows and humans line up patiently, waiting for the traffic to halt.
When the lights change, the birds hop in front of the cars and place walnuts, which they picked from the adjoining trees, on the road. After the lights turn green again, the birds fly away and vehicles drive over the nuts, cracking them open. Finally, when it's time to cross again, the crows join the pedestrians and pick up their meal. If the cars miss the nuts, the birds sometimes hop back and put them somewhere else on the road. Or they sit on electricity wires and drop them in front of vehicles.
Biologists already knew the corvid family=96it includes crows, ravens, rooks, magpies and jackdaws=96to be among the smartest of all birds. But this remarkable piece of behavior=96it features in the final program of "Life of Birds"=96would seem to be a particularly acute demonstration of bird intelligence.
The crows in Japan have only been cracking nuts this way since about
1990. They have since been seen doing it in California. Researchersbelieve they probably noticed cars driving over nuts fallen from a walnut tree overhanging a road. The crows already knew about dropping clams from a height on the seashore to break them open, but found this did not work for walnuts because of their soft green outer shell.

Bird Brains
http://www.pbs.org/lifeofbirds/brain/index.html
Biologists already knew the corvid family–it includes crows, ravens, rooks, magpies and jackdaws–to be among the smartest of all birds. But this remarkable piece of behavior–it features in the final program of "Life of Birds"–would seem to be a particularly acute demonstration of bird intelligence.

Crows have been video taped in science experiments, making tools, specifically bending wire into a hook, to pull food out of a container.

Yes, they are smart. That is why the folks her love their pet birds.