My husband and I have been contemplating getting a dog. However, we are a multi-pet household, and I am very concerned that *if* we get a dog, it will be one that will fit into our family! I don't really know any knowledgeable "dog people", so I figured I would ask for help here. First, which breed would be ideal? I realize that dogs, like people, are individuals with their own personalities - but breeds can be generalized by character traits etc... Second, would we want to look at males? or females?
Here are our criteria, in no particular order:

1.) minimal shedding (we both have some allergies)
2.) gets along with small animals (we have 2 cats and 2 parrots
3.) medium-sized or larger...we don't want a tiny dog, we want onethat can go backpacking, camping, play frisbee, etc...

We live in a large city, but right across the street from a large park. We are both quite active and would enjoy a jogging/romping in the park buddy.
Thanks!
~angela
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Here are our criteria, in no particular order: 1.) minimal shedding (we both have some allergies) 2.) gets along with ... 3.) medium-sized or larger...we don't want a tiny dog, we want one that can go backpacking, camping, play frisbee, etc...

What about a mini or standard poodle? From a good breeder they are awesome dogs.
Beth
Here are our criteria, in no particular order: 1.) minimal shedding (we both have some allergies) 2.) gets along with ... 3.) medium-sized or larger...we don't want a tiny dog, we want one that can go backpacking, camping, play frisbee, etc...

Bichon Frise! Ours gets along three cats and six parrots. Although the breed standard is 11.5 pounds, many are larger. Hardy dogs that can take the heat and cold - but certainly house dogs. The friendliest things walking. Play play and play some more. Not a guard dog at all:) "Suppose" to be the best re: allergies. Down side - grooming. Double coat that needs brushed frequently and groomed frequently.
Depending on how much training & exercise (daily) you intend to give, some suggestions I have are:
Weim
Doberman
Standard Poodle
I'd love to recommend both the Rottweiler & Boxer but the Rottie sheds like crazy and the Boxer isn't a good game/fetch dog. Few of them will play frisbee although they make up for their lack of normal dog games by being the house comedian.
If you decide to consider a Boxer then it'd have to be either a puppy or an adult from a rescue. Boxers tend to chase small animals that you wouldn't normally classify as pets (squirrels for example) with the exception of cats. If not raised with them then Boxers will chase them. A rescue can tell you which of their adult dogs is cat-friendly. One other down-side is that Boxers are notoriously difficult about being good off-leash dogs unless you train them from puppyhood. They will want to run up to every child, adult & animal they see to say hello so a good heel, watch-me & recall would be essential for playing in the park.

Tara
Depending on how much training & exercise (daily) you intend to give, some suggestions I have are: Weim Doberman Standard ... them will play frisbee although they make up for their lack of normal dog games by being the house comedian.

I think I'd tend to go Standard Poodle dogs with loads of smarts and great senses of humor, and probably a bit less likely to have very high prey drive than the dobe or the Weim. And truly I have yet to meet a "sane" Weim. I'm sure they're out there, but a fair number tend to be pretty darn wiggy.
Of course getting them groomed is a downside, but the upside is no shedding. Do be sure go to with a good breeder and research problems in the breed they can have a fair number.
Depending on how much training & exercise (daily) you intend to give,some suggestions I have are: Weim Doberman Standard Poodle

I have a weim, and I would not recommend one - they really are a breed for the truly determind* (as in you want a weim, and no other breed will do) and though can be trained to get along fine with other small animals, they are fundamentally a hunting dog with a *very strong prey drive.

They are also extremely determind themselves and though her intelligence is awesome, training Cin is extremely hard work - if she doesn't think its worth her while to co-operate, she won't. Push & pull as hard as you like, all you end up doing is driving a wedge into your relationship.

On top of this, they can be very far ranging, and really need a big open space for free running - so it really depends on what you mean by park - we have a large recreation ground 'park' which I would not run her on because she'd be across it in two bounds and it is used by families for, well, recreation - but then we have huge woodland parks which I would - provided I can see farther than I know she'll range out to (she is only young and can suffer from selective hearing).
Cinni has also been shedding, her first full moult - though her coat is very short, it can really shed and I've been sneezing solidly since she started .

Quote: And truly I have yet to meet a
"sane" Weim. I'm sure they're out there, but a fair number tend to be pretty darn wiggy.
I've met a few, but the price you pay for their sanity is your own Emotion: wink

As for recommendations - again, with regard to the small animals being a priority, why not have a look around your local shelters for a dog that has some known background and is already proven with small animals.

Diana
Depending on how much training & exercise (daily) you intend to give, some suggestions I have are: Weim Doberman Standard Poodle

You might want to re-think the Weimaraner suggestion. They are bird dogs and many have been known to consider cats as prey as well.

Ruth + Gretta, one old weim + Woody, the corgimon and Thelma, the three legged wonder cat
Quote: And truly I have yet to meet a "sane" Weim. I'm sure they're out there, but a fair number tend to be pretty darn wiggy. I've met a few, but the price you pay for their sanity is your own Emotion: wink

what a shame you have had so few meetings with "sane" weims. i have had them for 33 years and only owned one wacko lol. unfortunately, as the breed has gained in popularity, so have bad breeding practices, among both byb's and "reputable"breeders. weims do require a no nonsense approach to training, but once there, they are absolutely wonderful, intelligent, sensitive companions.

Ruth + Gretta, one old weim + Woody, the corgimon and Thelma, the three legged wonder cat
Depending on how much training & exercise (daily) you intend to give,some suggestions I have are: Weim Doberman Standard Poodle

You might want to re-think the Weimaraner suggestion. They are bird dogs and many have been known to consider cats as prey as well.

True. I had no idea of what kind of training, exercise or time the OP has to devote and if they'd start with a puppy. I should have made notes next to all the breeds I mentioned. The two Weims I know, granted not extremely well, live with indoor birds & one with cats, so I assumed that when raised with them they'd be fine.

Tara
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