Kali was standing on the ice-covered pool (the cover sank below the water level and was covered by a layer of ice). By walking on it she, cracked the ice and was standing directly on the cover in shallow water. Playing in the water, she started dragging broken pieces of ice out of the pool. Then I turned around and saw her lying down chewing on a very thick piece. I took it away from her but didn't think anything of it.
A day or two later when looking at her teeth I noticed she broke the tip off one of her molars; I'd say about the top 1/3 of the tooth is gone. Her vet said he could just yank it or recommend us to a doggie dentist but something needed to be done since the tooth pulp was exposed.

So we have an appt at the doggie dentist Thursday. Does anyone know what options are out there crown, drill/fill, implant a new tooth? I really don't like the idea of taking the tooth out and not replacing it perhaps a gold tooth with a diamond?
The good news, she doesn't seem to notice or care about it. And while she's sedated for the tooth, I'll be able to have her joints x-rayed again to see if this past year of agility has affected her joints.

TIA

Kristen and
Kali CDX, CGC, TDIA, TT
www.kristenandkali.com
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So we have an appt at the doggie dentist Thursday. Does anyone know what options are out there crown, drill/fill, implant a new tooth? I really don't like the idea of taking the tooth out and not replacing it perhaps a gold tooth with a diamond?

You can have the root canal and then have the holes filled, leaving the stub-tooth. I did that with my Aussie, and she still uses it. Crowns don't always stay on (which is why I didn't do it with Suni). You can do an implant, I believe.

-Abby
Pems, Aussie, and a Pug
*Remove shoes to reply*
You can get it pulled, or have a root canal done. Crowns are generally only done on canines, and only when it is extremely important that the dog be able to use the tooth heavily (like bitework, for police K9s). Crowns are REALLY expensive, and they fall off a lot.

If Kali is still going to be engaging in behavior that might break a tooth, like chewing on marrow bones, it might be better to just remove the tooth. A root canal tooth isn't as strong as a normal healthy tooth and is more likely to break if abused.
Solo broke a canine and I opted for the root canal since removing a canine is a pretty major undertaking. What they do is remove all the soft tissue inside the tooth and fill it in. The dentists smoothed the end off and you can barely tell anything happened to the tooth except that it's slightly short. Solo's allowed to chew or grab anything that isn't harder than a tooth, including most chew toys, rawhides, greenies, sheep wool, etc. He no longer gets marrow bones to chew on. I'm very pleased with the result.
Pulling a tooth requires no follow up appointments. The dog is on painkillers for a certain length of time (a week or so?) and must eat soft food during that time. Depending on the tooth, removal might require an actual operation instead of a straight "pull" (removing a canine requires digging out the root along its entire length by removing all the jaw bone that lies over it, for example). Can't remember how molars are removed. A root canal requires follow up x-rays six months after the procedure is done to be sure there is no infection present. There is practically no recovery time, no painkillers are required (I gave Solo some arnica) and the dog can eat whatever it's used to eating.

The price difference at the Penn vet school was about $300 with the root canal more expensive than a removal. Adding a crown to the root canal would have made the entire thing twice as expensive.

There are good articles on tooth removal and endodonty at IVIS:

http://www.ivis.org
You have to register, but it's free and the information is fab.

Melanie Lee Chang > Form ever follows function. Departments of Anthropology and Biology >
University of Pennsylvania > Louis Sullivan (Email Removed) >
You can do
an implant, I believe. -Abby Pems, Aussie, and a Pug *Remove shoes to reply*

Really? I wasn't aware of that. I wonder if implants for dogs is the same procedure as with humans?
Pull tooth, wait 3 months, put in implant,
wait another 3-4 months before placing
the tooth on? It's a rather long process
but, great in the longterm.
Gwen
Thanks guys. Our appt is in a couple hours, I'll see what the vet says, but it's nice to know something before going in. She loves bones so much I'd hate to never give her anymore NTM since they keep her teeth clean so I'd have to convince her to let me brush her teeth now.
Kristen and
Kali CDX, CGC, TDIA, TT
www.kristenandkali.com
The dentist said that it was a minor break and all he would need to do is polish it up and give the exposed dentin a fluoride treatment to help seal and harden it. I had her joints re-e-rayed while she was sedated. Agility has done nothing to her joints, in fact he said her hips were so good that if she wasn't spayed they're great breeding quality.

He also said no more bones, ever. That the tooth is weak now and if it breaks again, it could be a serious crack that would require a root canal. He said the rule of thumb from now on is only if it's bendable or if I can scratch it with a fingernail can Kali have it. He said that the rib bones I've been giving her are one of the softer bones and that the soup bones are really too hard to give dogs.
After the procedure he told me that if we capped the tooth she could still have bones and that if I cannot live with the restrictions we could cap it. I mentioned that I heard caps fall off. He said, knock on wood, that none of his have fallen off yet. I'm kinda ticked that he didn't tell me capping the tooth would allow her to chew bones I would've went with that. BTW caps only come in silver.
He also said that tooth implants on dogs do not do well. He said dog gums tend to recede far enough back that food gets under the implant and cause infection. He said that most dentists don't do them and I'd have to take her to Cornell or the Univ. or Penn for the procedure as it's still mostly experimental.
He was a wealth of knowledge, I learned so much about teeth! Did you know that dogs have only 1mm of enamel while people have 3-4?
Kristen and
Kali CDX, CGC, TDIA, TT
www.kristenandkali.com
The dentist said that it was a minor break and all he would need to do is polish it up and give the exposed dentin a fluoride treatment to help seal and harden it.
Good news. When Solo broke his tooth I'd hoped that it was only exposed dentin and not pulp, because then we would have done what you had done. But his went through to the pulp.
scratch it with a fingernail can Kali have it. He said that the rib bones I've been giving her are one of the softer bones and that the soup bones are really too hard to give dogs.
I don't do marrow bones anymore anyway, not even for Fly. They are REALLY hard and both my dogs are vigorous chewers. Neck bones are kind of spongy and good for chewing.
He was a wealth of knowledge, I learned so much about teeth! Did you know that dogs have only 1mm of enamel while people have 3-4?

We have thick enamel. It's a derived trait of our lineage. Chimps and gorillas have thin enamel. Orangs have thick enamel, but it's a homoplasy.

Melanie Lee Chang > Form ever follows function. Departments of Anthropology and Biology >
University of Pennsylvania > Louis Sullivan (Email Removed) >
I don't do marrow bones anymore anyway, not even for Fly. They are REALLY hard and both my dogs are vigorous chewers. Neck bones are kind of spongy and good for chewing.

Lots of Q's: Solo can chew with his tooth repair? Neck bones from what animal? Do you give them a whole raw neck of the animal? Are the neck bones hard enough to keep Fly and Solo's teeth clean or do you need to brush? Kali will send you lots of doggie kisses and tail wags if you can tell me how to get her something raw and meaty to chew on.
TIA

Kristen and
Kali CDX, CGC, TDIA, TT
www.kristenandkali.com
Neck bones from what animal?

I've given Khan Turkey and Pork neck bones, as well as cow feet and ox tail (in addition to marrow bones), and the occasional quail. If you're looking for soft bones, you're better off sticking with chicken and turkey. I have no real experience with this, but I have a friend who feeds her dogs lamb marrow bones and swears that they're much easier on the teeth than the beef bones, and another who feeds her fox terrier whole rabbits. She is about to experiment with giving him a whole rabbit with fur on, and has promised to report back about the experience.
Do you give them a whole raw neck of the animal?

Yup. I separate mine into individual sandwich bags, keep them frozen, and take them out as necessary. I don't bother defrosting before giving it, although I don't know if that would be a concern for you.
Are the neck bones hard enough to keep Fly and Solo's teeth clean or do you need to brush?

Khan's teeth were gross when we got him. Between all the bones and rawhide (and the occasional greenie or two), they cleaned up really nicely. My friend's current foster's teeth were green when she came to her on November 1st, and she has some really pretty pearly whites now, thanks to the lamb bones.
Kali will send you lots of doggie kisses and tail wags if you can tell me how to get her something raw and meaty to chew on.

If only she would share.
Suja
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