I've had it suggested to me recently, by two other experienced herpers, that I should consider housing my Burm and RTB in the same enclosure.

They are almost the same size now ~7-8ft long, although obviously the burm will get much bigger over time. (BTW, knowing it's a male now, what size can I expect eventually? I was thinking ~12-13ft?)
The suggestions came about purely as a space saving device, so rather than have two 6ft long enclosures, I could make one large one, maybe 8-10ft, and keep them together. The idea then is to build a bank of tanks on top of that to house my other snakes, and make room for several more Emotion: big smile and have them all in one place, thus reducing the clutter I have at the moment!

Barring the usual concerns of feeding separately, and what if one becomes ill and needs a separate enclosure, etc. which I'll address as a matter of course, are there any other reasons why I shouldn't keep them together? They have lived in very close proximity for over 2 years so disease/infection etc isn't an issue.
Chloe
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I've had it suggested to me recently, by two other experienced herpers,that I should consider housing my Burm and RTB in the same enclosure.

Personally, I am rather doubtful of the "experience" you mention of the other herpers who would even suggest that you keep two separate species (especially large Boids) together. This is what I would refer to as "bad advice that proliferates" in the herp world.
It boils down to this: If you do NOT have the room to properly house large snakes, do not get them in the first place! Burms, RTB's, & Iguana's are among the most discarded reptiles in the trade for this very reason...owners are not prepared (or don't want) to properly provide the needed space that these types of animals require.
It is not uncommon for differing species to become combative with one another, throw in the fact that you are talking about two large Boids, you have the potential for one (or both) becoming very stressed as well as taking a chance on severe injuries due to combative behavior.

In regards to size, my Albino Burm (Socrates) measures a little over 12 foot (12' 4"), and weighs 108 lbs.
Kind of off-topic, but I'll mention it anyway. One of my biggest pet-peeves with many owners of large snakes (6'+) is their inherent stupidity for allowing the snake to wrap around their neck.
"Stupid is as stupid does."
~Wade
Somehow, I think those two "experienced" herpers are a little out of their gourd on this one.
Never cohabitate boas and pythons. Boas carry illnesses that can be given to the python, and vice versa. You'll never even know until one or the other becomes sick.
Go with the two 6 foot long enclosures.
I do keep some adult corns together, but no more than 2 to an enclosure that has two hides, one on the hot spot, one on the cool end, for each snake. I wouldn't advise keeping young corns together-they seem to get "stupid" around feeding time.
-cat
I've had it suggested to me recently, by two other experienced herpers, that I should consider housing my Burm and RTB in the same enclosure.

Personally, I am rather doubtful of the "experience" you mention of the other herpers who would even suggest that you keep two separate species (especially large Boids) together. This is what I would refer to as "bad advice that proliferates" in the herp world.

I'm glad you've responded to this Wade! As it happens, I totally agree with you and was rather surprised at the suggestion, hence why I decided to ask here first. It is their opinion that they are indeed 'experienced', of which I have no evidence or seen any of their snakes to judge for myself, barring a photo of a burmese python on a website!
It boils down to this: If you do NOT have the room to properly house large snakes, do not get ... very reason...owners are not prepared (or don't want) to properly provide the needed space that these types of animals require.

Again, I totally agree. I am infact preparing to provide them each with a 7x2x2ft enclosure, which is about the largest in length and width, although could of course go higher if you think I should, that I can comfortably accommodate.
These snakes came to me as a sort of rescue. I certainly didn't intend on keeping such large boids out of choice, but now they're here I'll do everything I can to ensure they're as comfortable and well provided for as I possibly can. I don't know if you remember the story of my American military friends, their previous owners, that had to go back to the States in January and had made no provisions for either re-homing or shipping the snakes out to them, so I ended up as temporary carer but have had no contact with them since, so have to assume I'm now their full-time keeper!
It is not uncommon for differing species to become combative with one another, throw in the fact that you are ... for one (or both) becoming very stressed as well as taking a chance on severe injuries due to combative behavior.

This was my initial concern, and due to their size and strength I wouldn't have a cat in hell's chance of separating them should they decide to attack each other. I love them both far too much to risk that sort of situation and potential injury Emotion: smile
In regards to size, my Albino Burm (Socrates) measures a little over 12 foot (12' 4"), and weighs 108 lbs.

In your opinion, is that sort of size fairly manageable for a woman such as myself, well-built and fairly strong, and obviously any handling would never be done alone. Until last week the snake was thought to be female (sold as female by someone I won't name for fear of upsetting a particular person!) so I'd been fully prepared for the need to rehome at some point in the future, as no way could I keep a female burm, but it now turns out the snake is in fact male, so now I'm preparing myself for the possibility of keeping him for his entirity Emotion: smile
"Stupid is as stupid does."

Precisely! I don't wish to be strangulated by one of my pets! I also instill this into my son at every opportunity and only allow him to hold the big snakes when I'm with him and he is sat on the sofa with them in his lap. Another reason I always have someone present if I need to lift them is to help carry the body weight and prevent them from wrapping around the body. They can just as easily crush you around the chest as the neck!

Thanks for backing me up on my original thoughts Wade, I always value your opinion, as do many others here Emotion: smile
Cheers!
Chloe
In your opinion, is that sort of size fairly manageable for a woman suchas myself, well-built and fairly strong, and obviously any handling wouldnever be done alone.

NO!
A snake this size isn't fairly manageable for ANYONE, regardless of gender if attempting to do so on their own.
There is no two ways about it, this is a BIG snake, and much more powerful than many well-built people, regardless of their gender.

You mentioned one thing that is key to working around large snakes: Never do so alone!
~Wade
Somehow, I think those two "experienced" herpers are a little out of their gourd on this one.

I think so too! I think it's more a case that they've seen it done, and I too have seen it occur in certain reptile stores, but I doubt they have any actual experience of keeping them together long term.
Never cohabitate boas and pythons. Boas carry illnesses that can be given to the python, and vice versa. You'll never even know until one or the other becomes sick.

I know about IBD, but can't recall anything else specific off the top of my head (although that's not to be relied upon ) but as they've lived in such close proximity for over 2 years, i.e. enclosures on top of each other, I would have thought that would already have occured if it was to do so?
Go with the two 6 foot long enclosures.

I've already decided to do that anyway, and on measuring up I can actually go to 7ft quite easily. It will mean stacking them of course, but that's how they've always lived anyway Emotion: smile
I do keep some adult corns together, but no more than 2 to an enclosure that has two hides, one ... the cool end, for each snake. I wouldn't advise keeping young corns together-they seem to get "stupid" around feeding time.

The only snakes I keep together are my two corns (when the male re-appears!) and they have a 4ft tank with plenty of hides throughout. I don't plan on keeping anything else together, unless I decide to breed anything, but that will be with future snakes I'm hoping to get Emotion: wink
Chloe
In your opinion, is that sort of size fairly manageable ... strong, and obviously any handling would never be done alone.

NO!

Hehe! ... I'll consider myself well and truly told Emotion: wink
A snake this size isn't fairly manageable for ANYONE, regardless of gender if attempting to do so on their own. ... regardless of their gender. You mentioned one thing that is key to working around large snakes: Never do so alone!

I don't half ask some stupid questions at times, knowing full-well what the answers will be! I think part of me needs to hear it from someone else though just to convince me that I'm right!
I'm just so worried that the day will come when I need to part company with this beautiful snake, and I know it's gonna break my heart, so I guess I'm grasping at anything that means it's "possible" I can keep him forever.

Why do they have to grow so damn big Emotion: sad
Chloe
In regards to size, my Albino Burm (Socrates) measures a little over 12 foot (12' 4"), and weighs 108 lbs.

In your opinion, is that sort of size fairly manageable for a woman such as myself, well-built and fairly strong, and obviously any handling would never be done alone.

At that size, if it suddenly got it into its head that it wanted to kill you, it would, and there's very little you'd be able to do about it. One other person present is the bare minimum precaution you should take, I reckon.
Burms can be very, very friendly snakes for a lot of years, and this can lull their keepers into a false sense of security (I must confess, I can be a bit guilty of this with my boa). If and when they do get confused and misdirect a feeding response, it can come of a bit of a shock. I've heard of people who have essentially given up keeping snakes after a bad encounter with a "tame" Burm, or even a Boa constrictor.
They're extremely unlikely to get IBD - it's very rare in the UK. The number of recorded cases is very small, may even just be a single case, so you're probably OK housing the vivs in the same room on that score. AIUI, IBD mostly comes in on wild-caught animals, and most Boa constrictors and Burms in the UK pet trade are captive bred.
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