Greetings!
Today was my day off from work, but I was given the heads up that someone had a hold ticket on the baby ball python I have in the store. He's no more than a foot long. I was told that the person who has the hold ticket on him has another ball python, approximately 4 feet. He's coming to see me tomorrow at the pet store.
Now I'm not saying this guy is going to cage them together, but I want to be prepared just in case he tells me he IS going to cage them together.

Any experience/advice regarding keeping a larger ball python in the same tank as a very small one? I've had 3 footers and 5 footers together, but never such a small baby with larger ball pythons.
Thanks in advance.
Warmest Regards,
Dee
The baby will more than likely get squashed. Very bad idea until the baby is around 2.5' - 3'.
Instead of waiting for the customer to hint whether or not they're going to house the snakes together, you might consider asking him if he has/needs a small cage and supplies to go with the baby. You can then use that as a segue to suggest his "investment" would be better protected if it was housed separately from the big snake.

Robert J. Salvi, Ambiance Acoustics
http://www.ambianceacoustics.com
San Diego, CA USA
(858) 485-7514
The baby will more than likely get squashed. Very bad idea until the baby is around 2.5' - 3'. Instead ... as a segue to suggest his "investment" would be better protected if it was housed separately from the big snake.

Oh, I have every intention of asking him! I have no qualms about getting to the point when it comes to selling the herps in my care. Many people will back off when I tell them the cost of their "investment" includes an enclosure, lighting, substrate, heat sources, etc. I can't believe people sometimes, they think that they can just buy a herp and dump it in a box, throw in some grass and have it live happily ever after. What are they, nine years old?
One of the worst practices I've witnessed here in Florida is the sale of red eared slider hatchlings/babies. They are readily sold in flea markets, malls and street corners designated "for educational purposes only". You can't legally sell them until they are 4 inches. Many people will happily walk off with one of these little cuties along with a mini blue plastic tub with a cheesy plastic palm tree sticking out of the middle of it and no clue what they're in for. Eventually they grow up and end up alligator food in some pond or inlet. GRR!
Oops, looks like I'm on a rant... sorry for going off topic. Thanks for the info, R.J. I'll be sure to pass this information along. Let's hope the guy has a conscience.
I don't think a 4' Ball Python will "squash" anything. Housing them together may not be the ideal setup, but would most likely work out fine. Just dont feed them together!
I had it happen about 16 years ago and it happened the first night the baby was in the cage with the larger one. I found the baby squashed against the glass in between the glass and the bigger snake. It wasn't an aggressive move by the larger snake, just that the baby can't (or doesn't know) how/when to get out of the way
Also, if there's a hide in the cage, the baby will usually crawl underneath it with the larger snake and that too can create a multitude of problems every time the larger one moves.
This is one of those mistakes you only make once.

Robert J. Salvi, Ambiance Acoustics
http://www.ambianceacoustics.com
San Diego, CA USA
(858) 485-7514
WebTV-Mail-8942-3519
Hi I dont think its a good idea, but not a bad one either. Ball pythons are prymerly docile snakes,
who feed mostly on rodents, the larger
snake would primerily mistake the smaller
one for a piece of subtrate, and vice versa, and would probebly egnore each other all together.
But if you like. keep them separated until
the smaller one gets a little larger.
Carol
WebTV-Mail-8942-3519
Content-Description: signature
Content-Disposition: Inline