I'm used to having to calm down snakes Emotion: smile heh. So how does one go about calming down baby monitors? Just hold them a lot?
Tried to hold the one two timors I have seen eat tonight, little bugger can jump! I spent 20 minutes chasing him around my old herp room (now a quarantine room) and finally caught him.
I'm not holding the other one much, as I haven't seen it eat yet-I've seen the one I held eat.
-cat
I'm used to having to calm down snakes Emotion: smile heh. So how does one go about calming down baby monitors? ... I'm not holding the other one much, as I haven't seen it eat yet-I've seen the one I held eat.

A lot of time and constant handling...especially with Timors. As juveniles, Timors are quite "jumpy" at the best of times.
No secrets or shortcuts other than time and patience I'm afraid.

~Wade
Thanks, just wanted to make sure I was doing things right. I'm really glad my herp room is herp "proof" so that if one jumps, it can't go far. Emotion: smile

-cat
I'm used to having to calm down snakes Emotion: smile heh. So how does one go about calming down baby monitors? Just hold them a lot?

Baby monitors are going to be jumpy, hissy and squrmy whatever you do (assuming they are healthy, and with the caveat about the ocasional exception). As they grow, they tend to get calmer and most of the time you will see a transition to a significantly calmer and more trusting animal. This is all whether you handle them or not. However, you can screw up the process. This is most likely in the more high strung species (such as Niles or, in your case, Timors). Basically, handling causes stress. It causes the monitor to associate you with bad things. It learns you are a source of bad things. This makes it fear you more.

The key, I think, is to build trust with the lizard, rather than forcing contact. Let it know you are a source of good things (food). Let it get used to you on as non-stresful terms as possible. The calmer species will quickly come to accept your presence and may even tolerate handling. With the more nervous species you will probably get so far as to be able to watch them without them bolting for cover the moment they see you.
Tried to hold the one two timors I have seen eat tonight, little bugger can jump! I spent 20 minutes ... I'm not holding the other one much, as I haven't seen it eat yet-I've seen the one I held eat.

With Timors, you've got your work cut out for you. They almost never become calm through handling (and they've got those razor sharp climbing claws that give cuts like dozens of paper cuts - youch!). My advice with this species is to not handle it unless it is absolutely necessary (vet visits, escapes, etc.) or until it comes to you (this is rare). Otherwise, enjoy them as beautiful display animals.

For monitors you can handle, try ackies or, if you have the space, sand monitors, whitethroats, blackthroats, or salvators (the latter two require a lot of space).
Luke

To email me, take out the trash.
I'll keep trying-right now they are still in my quarantine room, but do you think it would be a good idea after quarantine is over to move them into a more-travelled part of the house? Or would that just create more stress?

-cat
I'll keep trying-right now they are still in my quarantine room, but doyou think it would be a good idea after quarantine is over to move them into a more-travelled part of the house? Or would that just create more stress?

Unfortunately, that would put an undue amount of stress on your Timors. Although very pretty monitors, Timors are kind of the "Barney Fife" of monitors; jumpy, nervous and high-strung.
What you will need to do is provide them with a very quiet area (preferably a spare room), and keep movements in and around their cage at a slow pace until they get to recognize you and realize that you are not a threat to them.
Continue to handle them, but again do so as slow and purposeful as possible. I would be a good idea to stand in front of their cage for a few minutes before reaching in and grabbing them...let them be aware of your presence before reaching in.
As you may have noticed, Timors also have claws similar to Johnny Scissorhands and are well adapted at using them. Use a pair of gloves and/or a long-sleeve shirt to be safe. I once had a pair of Dwarf-Timors and I often looked like I finished pruning roses in a hurricane...

It will take time, and you can calm some Timors down; but these are good candidates for display animals as the process can take an incredible amount of time if successful.
~Wade
Unfortunately, that would put an undue amount of stress on your Timors. Although very pretty monitors, Timors are kind of ... these are good candidates for display animals as the process can take an incredible amount of time if successful. ~Wade

I've only seen 1 Timor that was able to be handled. Welder gloves and jacket were used to prevent severe scratches/lacerations. This little guy would settle down after about 5-10 minutes, but only if his male owner was the one handling him. Anyone else, the Timor would scratch and claw forever.
I would suggest they be kept in their own private room. They do spook very easily. A larger cage is also needed so they don't hurt themselves when they do get spooked.
Good Luck!
Jim Smith

Blaming the gun for murder, is like blaming the car for hit and run!
Ok, having no experience with monitors, I thought I'd check with people who do have experience before doing anything. They are still in quarantine for another month or so anyway. My quarantine room is not well-travelled, and enclosed.
I've been randomly reaching in to handle them, or just dig around in their enclosure when they are out and about-and so far, one has decided he can stand me. He won't let me hold him without hissing and a nip or two-and he loves to posture when I walk in the room.
-cat
I'll keep trying-right now they are still in my quarantine room, but do you think it would be a good idea after quarantine is over to move them into a more-travelled part of the house? Or would that just create more stress?

Timors seem to be one of those "run for cover as soon as you see a human" type animals. In a heavily travelled room, they might end up spending all of their time under cover, not giving them the time to do what needs to be done (eat, drink, bask, etc).
However, this is just some starting advice. In the end YOU will be the most qualified person to make the decision, because you will be the one who has gotten to know the animals. Pay attention to them. It they seem to be comfortable just hanging out when you are around, you may decide to move them. If they are getting stressed from too much activity, put them in a quieter place.
Good luck,
Luke

To email me, take out the trash.