I bought a Sulcata this past summer (please don't laugh!). I've just put my sliders away to hibernate for the winter but I was not planning on doing that with the Sulcata because I read they do not hibernate. But my sulcata has been sleeping virtually the entire time since the weather got a bit cold (I live in Coastal South Carolina, so it doesn't get really cold outside and I am keeping him inside).

Even when I have him sunning, he sleeps through that and doesn't eat for the few minutes he wakes up after sunning. I keep him indoors where it hasn't gotten below 70 degrees F, but he is sleeping and not eating as if he would prefer to hibernate. Should I stop annoying him and put him away to hibernate??? He hatched somewhere around January 2004, so he is not quite a yearling.
Thanks
Jack
Keep him warmer. He needs a temperature gradient of 75-90 degrees, with the
90 being a hot basking area under a UVB bulb. If you're able to put himoutside to bask in a protected sunny spot during the winter, you won't need the UVB bulb, otherwise you should get one, and no they aren't cheap, but you gotta do it.
Have you researched sulcata tortoise care sheets?
Cindy
I keep him indoors where it hasn't gotten below 70 degrees F, but he is sleeping and not eating as if he would prefer to hibernate.

70 degrees is a good temperature for a tropical reptile too cool offin. It is not warm enough for active behavior. Put up some good floodlamps to get a basking spot in the 110 to 150 degree F range.
Should I stop annoying him and put him away to hibernate??? He hatched somewhere around January 2004, so he is not quite a yearling.

Sulcatas do not really hibernate, but they will go semi-dormant when conditions get bad (typically in the dry season). However, it never gets cold. Temperatures are tropical year round (just really dry for much of the year). I have no idea how prolonged cool temperatures will affect them (respiratory disease? Other problems?).

Your choice, but I'd give the tortoise a nice hot basking area.

Luke